The Nepal Digest - November 7, 1993

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The Nepal Digest Sunday, 7 November 93 Volume 21: Issue 3

Today's Topics:
   
      1. Taja_Khabar: News from Nepal
      2. Tin_Muktak: Existence - Life, Maturity and Death
      3. Jan_Kari: Dashain Celebration in Ohio
      4. Kura_Kani: Getting Dirty
      5. Jan_Kari: Greetings
      6. Kehi_Bichar: Sometimes ....
      7. Khoj_Khabar: Hydrology
      8. Jan_Kari: Just wanted to share

  *****************************************************************************
  * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@cs.niu.edu *
  * SCN Correspondent: Rajesh B. Shrestha rshresth@black.clarku.edu *
  * Editing Editor: Padam P. Sharma sharma@plains.nodak.edu *
  * Discussion Moderator: Ashutosh Tiwari tiwari@husc9.harvard.edu *
  * News Correspondent: Vivek SJB Rana rana@ccit.arizona.edu *
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  * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
  * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" - Anon. *
  * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" - Sirdar_RJS_Khalifa *
  * *
  *****************************************************************************
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******************************************************************************* Date: Mon, 01 Nov 1993 18:51:20 MST To: a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu
               ______ _
              |______| /-\ | | /-\
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                | | / /__\ \ /|_| | / /--\ \
                |_| /_/ \_\ | _ _| /_/ \_\
      _ _ _ _ ______ ______
     | | / / | | | | /-\ | |(__)\ /-\ | |(__)\
     | |/ / | |____| | / /\ \ | |___ / / /\ \ | |_ _/
     | |\ \ | |____| | / /--\ \ | |(__)\ / /--\ \ | |--\ \
     |_| \_\ |_| |_| /_/ \_\ |_|___ / /_/ \_\ |_| \ \
>From news correspondent : Vivek S.J.B. Rana
E-mail Add : rana@evax2.engr.arizona.edu
                               rana@ccit.arizona.edu

                U.S. climber falls to death in Nepal
                ------------------------------------ Source : UPI Kathmandu, Nepal

        A 47-year-old New Mexico doctor climbing with a 10- member U.S. expedition fell to his death from the 23,494-foot (7,161-m) Mount Pomori, Nepalese officials said Friday.

        Gregory Gordon of Santa Fe, N.M., fell to his death Thursday, the Tourism Ministry said.

        ``He fell to his death on Thursday, Oct. 28, at 1 p.m. while climbing down to Camp Two,'' Pasquael Scaturro, 40, a geophysicist and a member of the team from Lakewood, Colo., told the U.S. Embassy in the Nepalese capital by satellite telephone, the ministry said.

        ``It was not possible to recover the body from the mountain,'' Scaturro told the embassy, the ministry said.

        The fall was witnessed by another member of the expedition, Lee Klopfer, 37, a landscape architect from Santa Fe, the ministry said.

        The expedition was led by Timothy Brill, 34, a mountain guide from Spanaway, Wash.

        Gordon's death brought to five the number of climbers killed in the current autumn climbing season in the Nepalese Himalayas, the ministry said.

        A seven-member Greek team also climbing Pumori through the same southeast ridge route and led by Epan Nikas, 55, abandoned its climb at a high point of 20,700 feet after it encountered deep snow.

        The team left its base camp for the Nepalese capital en route home on Oct. 23, the Tourism Ministry said.

 
                U.S. climbers reach Nepali summit
                -----------------------------------

        KATMANDU (UPI) -- All seven members of a predominantly U.S. expedition scaled the 21,129-foot (6,440-m) Cholatse through the south ridge on three separate days Oct. 21-23, Nepali officials said Wednesday.
        Expedition leader John Climaco, 25, a businessman from Hunting Valley, Ohio, Christopher Bremer, 24, a student from Berkeley, Calif., Robert Cassady, 28, a technician from Boulder, Colo., and Andrew Brash, 25, a British forester living in Lancaster, Ontario, Canada, climbed in the first group, the Tourism Ministry said, quoting base camp reports.
        Thomas Heinrich, 33, a Swedish engineer living in Buenos Aires, Argentina, stepped on the summit Oct. 22, the ministry said.
        Glenn Dunmire, 32, a carpenter from Estes Park, Colo., and Edward Webster, 37, a teacher from Boulder, Colo., climbed in the last group Oct. 23, the ministry said.

        Eight expeditions to attempt five peaks in winter
        -------------------------------------------------

        Eight expeditions are expected to attempt to scale five peaks in the Nepal Himalaya during the winters months from Dec. 1 to mid-February, according to permits approved by the Ministry of Tourism.
        Heidi Nazuka, 38, who climbed Mount Everest for the first time in 1985, plans to lead another group up the difficult southwest face of the world's tallest peak.
        A seven-member United States team led by James Williams, 39, of Jackson, Wyoming, and a U.S. team led by William Crouse, 29, of Park City, Utah, plan to attempt Ama Dablam along the southwest ridge.
        Ama Dablam also is the target for a Japanese expedition led by Hiroshi Nakamura, 42, and a Korean team guided by Kwang Yoon, 35.
        A five-member Australian team led by Armando Corvini, 54, will attempt Cholatse through the west face route while two Swiss climbers, Juan Carlos Piedra, 31, and Jean Luc Beausire, 37, have been given permission to scale Cho Oyu, the ministry said.

                U.S.- Nepal sign 4-year garment pact
                ------------------------------------ Source : UPI KATHMANDU, Nepal,
 
        The United States and Nepal signed Wednesday another four-year agreement to increase Nepalese garment exports to the United States by 10 percent in 1994, a senior U.S. official said.
        ``In addition to the 10 percent increase for next year (1994), all the quotas will go up by 6 percent every additional year,'' said Jennifer Hilman, chief textile negotiator and trade representative.
        The agreement was signed by Hilman and Nepal Commerce Secretary Durga Prasad Pandey after talks began in Nepal on Tuesday.
        ``Nepal is the only country we have granted an increase in the shirts category out of all the countries we've talked to,'' Hilman said.
        Quotas were fixed for three categories of garment exports to the United States: cotton shirts for men, shirts made out of fibers such as rayon and women's blouses made of rayon.
        ``All other categories have no restrictions. So Nepal can export as much as it likes in these categories,'' Hilman said.
        The United States has made similar agreements with 12 other countries, and Hilaman said negotiations have begun with Pakistan and China, with other talks set to begin next week with Jamaica.
        ``The agreement has provided a great deal of flexibility. It allows us to move 6 percent of the quota from a category if you are not using it to a category you are using. It also allows for unused quota in a given year to be brought to the next year,'' she said, noting that Nepal has not fully used its quotas.

******************************************************************** From: dagrawal@abacus.bates.edu (Dileep Agrawal) Subject: News To: NEPAL@mp.cs.niu.edu (The Editor) Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 19:13:41 -0500 (EST)
                                                                                 HEADLINE: Japanese teams to attempt winter ascents in Nepal
                                                                                
 BODY:
   Three Japanese teams will be among the eight different mountaineering expeditions climbing in the Himalayas in the coming winter season from December 1 to February 15, the Nepalese Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation said Monday.
                                                                                
   Japan's Gunma expedition will attempt to make a winter ascent of Mt. Everest from its southwest face. Known as the Bonnington route, the face has not yet been climbed in winter.
                                                                                
   The seven-member team, to be led by Hideji Nazuka, 39, plans to reach the 8,848-meter-high summit in mid-December.
                                                                                
   A Japanese expedition attempted to conquer the mountain by the southwest face in the winter of 1991-92 but was driven back by strong winds at 8,350 meters.
                                                                                
   An expedition from the Sapporo Alpine Association led by Kouichi Ezaki, 40, will attempt to climb Mt. Langtang Lirung (7,234 meters) from the southeast ridge and a Showa Printing expedition to be led by Hiroshi Nakamura, 41, will bid for the summit of Mt. Ama Dablam (6,812 meters) this winter.
                                                                                

HEADLINE: UNHCR, NGOs hold int'l meeting for refugees DATELINE: KATHMANDU, Nov. 1 Kyodo
                                                                                
 BODY:
   The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) on Monday began a regional meeting in Kathmandu to discuss cooperation on a serious refugee issue in South Asia.
                                                                                
   The three-day meeting, hosted by the UNHCR, was attended by about 65 nongovernmental organizations from Bangladesh, India, Nepal Sri Lanka.
                                                                                
   In his keynote speech, P. N. Bhagawati, former chief justice of India, said,
'The partnership (between the UNHCR and the NGOs) needs to be strengthened and promoted.'

   He stressed the increased need for concerted action to help people uprooted and displaced by internal and ethnic conflicts.
                                                                                
   The world currently has some 18 million refugees, mostly from Asia and Africa, 80% of them women and children, he said.
                                                                                
   Among Asian countries, Nepal has 100,000 refugees from Bhutan and an estimated 20,000 refugees from the Tibetan autonomous region of China.
                                                                                
                                                                                 HEADLINE: nepal's parliament team visits three european countries DATELINE: kathmandu, november 1; ITEM NO: 1101134
                                                                                
 BODY:
   a 7-member nepalese parliamentary delegation left here today for a 2-week visit to norway, sweden and germany at the invitation of the three countries' parliaments. talking to pressmen at the airport before their departure, delegation head daman nath dhungana, lower house speaker, said that "the delegation's visit is to consolidate relations between the nepalese parliament and parliaments of the three countries". during the visit to berlin, he said that his delegation would meet with german leaders and study the progress in germany after the unification.

***********************************************************************************************

***********************************************************************************************                                                                                  DATELINE: KATHMANDU, Nov. 3 Kyodo
 BODY:
   The United States agreed on Wednesday to raise by an annual 6% the quota for ready-made garments allocated to Nepal, the Nepalese Ministry of Commerce announced.
                                                                                
   The U.S. also announced it has opened its market for the first time to traditional Nepalese woolen carpets, the country's number one export item, ministry officials said.
                                                                                
   The agreement was signed on Wednesday following two days of talks between Nepalese government officials and a U.S. delegation led by trade representative and chief textile negotiator Jennifer Hillman.
                                                                                
   'The talks were very fruitful and would contribute to raising exports of Nepalese garments to the American market,' said Hillman, who signed the agreement on behalf of the U.S government.
                                                                                
   Nepalese Trade Secretary Durga Prakash Panday signed for the Nepalese side.
  
                                                                               HEADLINE: nepal to reduce government manpower, expenditure DATELINE: kathmandu, november 3; ITEM NO: 1103197
 BODY:
   the nepalese government has decided to implement a new organizational pattern with a view to making abler and effective the government organizations. the new pattern would be first carried at the land reform and management ministry and the offices of departments functioning under it, government sources said here today. according to spokesman of the ministry of land reform and management hem mohar shrestha, a total of 24.34 percent of the ministry's manpower would be cut at the central level organizations and 9.8 percent at the district level organizations, while 900 posts would be maintained in the ministry and a total of 5,054 posts at the districts level. this initial organizational restructuring is expected to reduce the government's burden of loan by 6 million rupees (122,000 u.s. dollars) and 18.3 million rupees (373,000 u.s. dollars) annually at the central and district levels, respectively. special working policy and modus operandi will also be pursued so that there should be no shortage of service and facilities rendered to the people, the spokesman said.
 
                                                                                HEADLINE: international nursing conference opens in nepal DATELINE: kathmandu, november 2; ITEM NO: 1102124
 BODY:
   a three-day international conference on "nursing research for the enhancement of maternal and child health" started here today. the conference was organized jointly by the nursing association of nepal and the nursing research society of india. nepalese prime minister girija prasad koirala, who is paying a private visit in tibet of china, sent a message to the conference, expressing conviction that the conference would help make the nursing profession "more effective, people-oriented and efficient in rendering services to the patients." participating in the conference are some 500 nurses from nepal, 46 from india and others from pakistan, thailand, japan, cambodia, norway and the united kingdom.
                                                                                
                                                                                 HEADLINE: intl conference on refugees starts in nepal DATELINE: kathmandu, november 2; ITEM NO: 1102054
 BODY:
   a three-day international conference on refugee crisis and humanitarian challenges in south asia opened here on monday. the conference named "the partners in action" was jointly organized by the united nations high commission for refugee (unhcr) and the geneva-based international council of voluntary agencies (icva). the three-day conference will focus on various issues concerning refugees and the ways of strengthening the mechanism to deal with the refugee problems in a coordinated and more effective manner. nepalese prime minister girija prasad koirala, who is paying a private visit to tibet of china, sent a message to the conference, expressing the belief that this conference would contribute to finding just and lasting solutions to refugee problems around the world. 67 representatives from various non-governmental organizations of nepal, india, bangladesh and sri lanka, five observers and eight representatives of the unhcr attended the conference.
  
                                                                               HEADLINE: NEPAL: NEPAL CHANGES POLICY - AVIATION
 BODY:
     Nepal has launched a series of major changes to its aviation policy, including a degree of international liberalisation and the probable restructuring of state-owned Royal Nepal Airlines into separate international and domestic operations.
                                                                                
    The major aeropolitical change is that access for foreign airlines to the Himalayan country's international air routes will be extended. 'We call it air space liberalisation,' says Rajesh Dali, Nepal's deputy director general of civil aviation. Nepal officials feel it will help promote traffic and tourism growth. There is no timetable yet; the government is still working on policy details.
                                                                                
    The new domestic offshoot of Royal Nepal will be fully privatised, adds Dali. Foreign investment is likely to be welcomed, but the government has not yet decided what size stake should be offered to foreign interests. The international operation of Royal Nepal may also eventually be opened to private investment, says Dali. 'But at the moment we are concentrating on the domestic airline.'
                                                                                
    Royal Nepal operates two Boeing 757s and one 727 on international routes to Frankfurt, London, Paris, Bangkok, Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai, and to Delhi, Bombay and Calcutta in India. Royal Nepal, whose chairman is also
 Nepal's secretary for tourism and civil aviation, is planning more aircraft and routes.
                                                                                
    Royal Nepal's domestic operations are being privatised chiefly because of heavy competition from six local operators: Necon Air, Nepal Airways, Everest Air, Himalayan Helicopters, Dynasty Aviation and Asian Airlines. For domestic operations Royal Nepal uses 12 turboprop aircraft, mostly Twin Otters.

******************************************************************** Date: November 7, 1993 To: The Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu> From: Rajpal J. Singh <a10rjs1@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Tin_Muktak

Note: Another one dug_up from my old archives for your leisure .....

                        EXISTENCE
                        --------- LIFE

   Crouched for nine months,
   I couldn't see, couldn't move
   I just could feel
   That's how it started.

   Now I'm walking on the endless road
   With my own share of heavy load
   Trying to find the end;

MATURITY

   Acted when I was little
   Imitations as a teenager
   When it hit adulthood
   My mind .... an ever-changing mood.

   Many times found myself lost
   With no home, goal and self trust;
   Words pretty pure, but the thoughts impure,
   I told myself ..... "hey, I'm mature".

DEATH

   I was not prepared
   A scary thought that we all shared,
   Symbolizing a cave, endless sleep or darkness,
   No matter, the fear is not less;

   Will we loose or will we gain?
   Nothing to worry, I told myself,
   At least I won't feel the pain.

-Sirdar_RJS_Khalifa
 March 17, 1989

******************************************************************************* From: Puspa M Joshi <pjoshi@magnus.acs.ohio-state.edu> Subject: Dassai celebrations in Ohio Date: Tue, 2 Nov 93 18:59:21 EST

In spite of a day-long snowfall, Nepali students and Columbus residents from Nepal gathered at Ohio State's Buckeye Village Recreation Center Saturday evening to celebrate the Vijaya Dashami festival. The Columbus group decided to begin the celebrations later than usual, on Oct. 30th, to allow the participation of those who would like to journey to Chicago for the holiday.

The presence of distinguished guests Mr. and Mrs. Lain Singh Bangdel
(noted Nepali artists and art historians), who have been visiting their daughter Deena in Columbus, made the celebration all the more exciting. For those in the group who are (American) football fans, the Ohio State victory over Penn State contributed to the joyful mood.

At the dinner, a variety of delicious Nepali food prepared by the attendees, including Lal mohan, Rasbari, and Barfi, were served.

During the cultural program after the meal, songs and dances were presented by students and their families from the Ohio State University, Capital University, and Columbus State Community College. In between the songs and dances jokes were told, some good, some bad, some even worse. Although the formal party ended around the 11 pm., many of the invited assembled a short while later at Puspa Joshi's apartment to play Kitti until 1 am. Who won and who lost will for ever be a secret.

***************************************************************************** Date: Wed, 3 Nov 1993 10:30:10 -0600 (CST) From: Padam Sharma <sharma@plains.NoDak.edu> Subject: Getting Dirty

      
  Is it mother's no no? A playful thing, an art, a science or a mean of
  livelihood?
      
  When folks ask me what do you do for a living; I answer, " I am a soil
  scientist". When I see conundrum in their eyes, I make a straight face and
  explain further, "You know, I play with dirt, and get paid for it". In
  order to learn about "soil", and earn from "soil", I have to get on my
  knees and get dirty.
      
  Is not it interesting to note that when we say "dirty" the reflex word that
  pops in our mind (especially the contemporary Nepali mind) is "politics".
  As with soil, the learning of politics, perhaps, requires one to be dirty.
      
  The recent political soap of Congress Party brasses GP-YP-KP trio and the
  subsequent comments and speculations in the TND inspired this PP to get
  dirty and make something out of it. Remember folks, I am not taking any
  sides, I am just trying to learn the art of political spinning. In order
  to learn, I have to get dirty and make mistakes, and I hope, this does
  not impinge on any body's feelings. Before going any further, let me
  give my perceptions of these individuals and the event in New York (based
  on TND hearsay, of course!) . My approach perhaps is not any more
  scientific than a blind man trying to define an elephant.
      
  KP: Perceived as a wise, humble and honest man; devoted his life in the
  struggle for democracy in Nepal; did a commendable job as a compromise
  prime minister during the transition period; miscalculated his political
  fortune in running against Madan Bhandari in the last election, otherwise,
  he would have been the walk-in PM candidate; current party boss; very
  amiable fellow; pyarse log unhe "kishunji" kahate hain!
      
  GP: Along with his brother BP, he also devoted most of his life in the
  struggle for democracy in Nepal; somewhat militant and arrogant in his
  demeanor; not a very likable fellow; party members think he is dooming the
  congress party; made lame-duck by their compromise with the communists; he
  thinks he is working hard and not getting any respect and cooperation
  especially from his own party rank and file; obviously an expended and very
  irritated fellow.
      
  YP: A career congresi politician; got a political retirement gift of
  ambassadorship to US; his qualifications included a cabinet ministry during
  BP's regime, his loyalty to the party and a pioneer Fulbright or some
  fellowship to US in the fifties. As a friend and party boss, YP probably
  likes KP more than GP. Moreover, KP is recuperating after a surgery and
  visiting YP in DC, so YP has a moral obligation to serve KP (atithi devo
  bhawa), and of course, make hay while the sun shines (baleko aago sabaile
  tapchhan).
      
    As an ambassador to US, YP fulfilled his primary protocol duties by
  receiving GP at NY airport. Since we have a separate high commission to
  the UN, and they could very well baby-sit GP, YP thought his time would
  be well spent if he flew back to DC and attended to his own chores. Being
  in the US for a while, YP is perhaps spoiled enough to value his time and
  not waste it in chakadi of a lame-duck PM. Not a matter of protocol but
  as a matter of courtesy, YP should have accompanied GP to UN Mission. If
  KP was not in DC, YP perhaps would have done that. Knowing that his rival
  KP was at YP's place in DC, jittery GP was obviously furious with YP. If
  KP was not in DC, and YP had asked permission to leave from the airport, I
  don't think GP would have demurred, and this matter would not have been
  raised at all.
      
    This episode and the one at a reception in Kathmandu are just small
  examples of the personality conflicts and lack of communication among the
  leaders of the Congress Party. This incident in itself does not in anyway
  reflect on their individual capabilities to serve the country. In their
  own paradigm, and the system of chakadi mentality and hajur culture, they
  are doing their best.
      
    The time spent on inter- and intra-party bickering is inversely
  proportional to time spent for advancement of national interests. Perhaps,
  this bickering is a manifestation of borrowed constitution and party
  structure (made in England translated in India) adopted in Nepal that
  we have to learn to live with. There is a fundamental flaw in the Indian
  political model. Coupled with corruption, it encourages personality
  conflicts, polarization, and fragmentation of party into religious,
  racial, ethnic, and regional interest groups. It is true for both the
  congressis and the communists. Look at how many parties are there in India
  now. It is only the pre-dawn of democracy in Nepal; no matter which party
  governs the country in the future, we should be prepared to see lots of
  fracas along the way.
      
    As for frustrated GP who thinks sitting down is more respectful (to his
  malapropos ego) than standing up for something, the Congress Party should
  consider buying him a Lazy Boy recliner as a parting gift. For rest of
  the janata janardan whether in Nepal, India or abroad, the struggle for
  sustenance of life goes on.
      
  Aayo Dashain dhol bajai, gayo Dashain rin bokai......
  Happy Diwali to all TND readers
  PPSharma
  
************************************************************************ Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 12:47:03 +0800 (SST) From: Om Bahadur Raut <raut@emailhost.ait.ac.th> Subject: Happy Dipawali 2050 To: TND members <nepal@cs.niu.edu>

Dear Friends
        Happy Dipawali 2050 ko Shubha Upalaxama Sukha, Sammridhi abam Ujjwal Bhabishya ko Hardik Mangalmaya Kamana.

Om Raut AIT

****************************************************************** Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 01:06:56 -0500 (EST) Subject: sometime To: nepal@cs.niu.edu From: "G. Pokharel" <g44329a@nucc.cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp>

Dedicated to those readers who suggested me to continue on TND.

Sometimes : for me (I do not know about the TND readers)

It takes courage

        to work, | source
        to study, | -unknown
        to expand, | X=Y=Z
        to be fair,
        to be loyal,
        to apologize,
        to begin over,
        to take advice,
        to be unselfish,
        to be charitable,
        to meet your debt,
        to grow in strength,
        to keep out of a rut,
        to forgive and forget,
        to practice persistence,
        to profit from mistakes,
        to withstand tempetations,
        to follow the golden rule,
        to make the most of little,
        to face jeer with assurance,
        to everlastingly keep trying,
        to maintain a higher standard,
        to always see the silver lining,
        to admit error when in the wrong ,
        to be truthful in every situation,
        to avoid judging lest you be judged,
        to save for those rainy days coming,
        to stick to the things you know best,

        BUT IT PAYS. I DO NOT KNOW WHEN.
                                                - Gyaneswor Pokharel

************************************************************************* Date: Thu, 4 Nov 1993 13:36:32 -0800 (PST) From: Martin Carver <carver@unixg.ubc.ca> Subject: conferences To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

Hi,

I am wondering if anyone knows of conferences on hydrology and sediment transport in the Himalayas in 1994?

I know of one coming up in June at AIT and one in Italy about the same time about mountain environments.

Any others?

Martin Carver carver@unixg.ubc.ca

********************************************** Date: Fri, 5 Nov 93 19:42:12 PST From: Rupa Dixit Joshi <rjoshi@scf.usc.edu> To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@mp.cs.niu.edu> Subject: Just sharing with you.

Dear TND readers, Just wanted to share a little piece of khoos khabar with you. This will be like "afno dhyangroa afai peetnu," but I have to share it with people who would appreciate the fact. Last Monday, November 1, on op/ed (opinion) piece of mine entitled "A message of value carried by the ashes" in the Los Angeles Times. It was a reflective piece on the recent fires that ravaged the mountain community around the city. At the end of the piece there was a note which identified me as a "wife and a mother of three and a Fulbright scholar from Nepal studying......" It's the "from Nepal" part that filled me with an "achumma" ko pride. That's basically what I wanted to share with you all.

I have heard from a couple of TND readers with their ideas on press censorship in Nepal. If anybody else has any more info please let me know asap.

Happy deusi and bhailo to all of you! Rupa Joshi

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