The Nepal Digest - May 12, 1995 (29 Baishakh 2052 BkSm)

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Date: Fri May 12 1995 - 13:34:42 CDT


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The Nepal Digest Friday 12 May 95: Baishakh 29 2051 BkSm Volume 38 Issue 7

 ******************************************************************************
 * TND Board of Staff *
 * ------------------ *
 * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu *
 * SCN Liaison: Rajesh B. Shrestha rshresth@black.clarku.edu *
 * Consultant Editor: Padam P. Sharma sharma@plains.nodak.edu *
 * TND Archives: Sohan Panta k945184@atlas.kingston.ac.uk *
 * Book Reviews Columns: Pratyoush R. Onta ponta@sas.upenn.edu *
 * News Correspondent Rajendra P Shrestha rajendra@dartmouth.edu *
 * *
 * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
 * *
 * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" -Dr. MLK *
 * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" - Sirdar Khalifa *
 * *
 ******************************************************************************

********************************************************************** Date: Wed, 10 May 95 08:38:27 CDT From: sbshah@gumbo.bae.lsu.edu (Sanjay B. Shah) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Re: Passport Renewal

Dear Editor,
        Please publish the following text in your forthcoming issue. Thanks. Sanjay
                        INFORMATION REQUIRED
        My passport is due for renewal in 3 months and I would like to obtain the following information from experienced netters:
(1) Location: Embassy or consular offices, addresses and telephone
#s of the more prompt ones.
(2) Cost and (3) Time required.
        I tried contacting the Consul General's office in NY but I could not get through and I do not have the Embassy tel. #. I'll be grateful for the information. Thanks in advance.

Sanjay Bikram Shah sbshah@gumbo.bae.lsu.edu

************************************************************************ From: t01bbk@aberdeen.ac.uk Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - May 9, 1995 (26 Baishakh 2052 BkSm) To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 15:52:43 +0100 (BST)

Dear Sir, Namaskar,

This if my quirry about how to use the best, meagre time and money while travelling in USA. Here, I am realyy looking for the information regarding 15 days travel card good for travelling in whole of USA.

So far as my knowledge is concern, it cost about:

        $ 450.00 by air plane, minimum 4 flight accross USA,
        $ 300.00 by train off peak 15 days accross USA
        $ 200.00 by bus 15 days accross USA

These above prices are not exact but close to the point and subject to change.

Can any one advise me of any other opportunity for the travellor like me with limited resources.

THERE IS NOTHING FOR NEPALI IS IT TRUE THERE IN U.S.A?

GRANT FOR FURTHER STUDY IN U.K.
------------------------------

I tried my best to find the grant for Ph.D in UK. I found that it is unlikely for we people from developing countries to get any kind of grant
 while we are studying in UK. Further more, the possibility of extending TCT award is 0.09 as per my discussion with one of the authority.

 All advertisement for Research Assistantship says "equal opportunity employer" but the real selection based on locality. For example, if opportunity is in the University of Aberdeen, than they select a candidate from Abedeen itself followed by Scotland, UK, EEC countries and lastly Commonwealt countries. Virtually there is nothing for Nepali.

Can any one suggest me about whether or not; is it worth tryuing to get Research Assistantship leading to Ph.D in USA?

BBK t01bbk@abdn.ac.uk University of Aberdeen Great Britain.

**************************************************************************** Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 11:07:46 -0400 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: SAARC Summit Opens With Calls For Regional Trade Bloc From: abdutta@icaen.uiowa.edu (jit)

INTRO: A SUMMIT OF SEVEN SOUTH ASIAN LEADERS HAS OPENED WITH URGENT CALLS FOR FORMATION OF A REGIONAL TRADE BLOC. FROM VOA'S NEW DELHI BUREAU, PETER HEINLEIN REPORTS SOME OF THE LEADERS USED THE SUMMIT'S OPENING SESSION AS A FORUM FOR THEIR GRIEVANCES.

TEXT: INDIAN PRIME MINISTER P-V NARASIMHA RAO STRUCK THE FIRST NOTE FOR ECONOMIC COOPERATION. IN HIS OPENING ADDRESS OF THE THREE-DAY SUMMIT. MR. RAO WARNED THAT SOUTH ASIA CANNOT AFFORD TO FALL BACK AS THE PACE OF GLOBAL CHANGE INCREASES.

HE URGED HIS COLLEAGUES TO IMMEDIATELY FORM A REGIONAL TRADE BLOC AS THE FOCUS OF GLOBAL TRADE SHIFTS TOWARD ASIA.

                          // RAO ACT //

         WE CAN TAKE ENCOURAGEMENT FROM THE PERCEIVED HISTORICAL
         SHIFT THAT WE ARE MOVING TOWARDS WHAT IS PREDICTED WILL
         BE THE "ASIAN CENTURY". WE HAVE TO ENSURE THAT THROUGH
         OUR VISIONARY ACTIONS THAT SOUTH ASIA IS PART OF THIS
         RESURGENCE AND DOES NOT BECOME A BACKWATER OF THE NEW
         ASIA.

                          // END ACT //

IN HIS SPEECH, PRIME MINISTER RAO AVOIDED MENTION OF THE BILATERAL DISPUTES WHICH HAVE LONG HINDERED REGIONAL COOPERATION. BUT PRESIDENT FAROOQ AHMED LEGHARI OF INDIA'S REGIONAL ARCH-RIVAL PAKISTAN, MADE SEVERAL THINLY VEILED CRITICISMS OF HIS HOSTS.

MR. LEGHARI, FILLING IN FOR PRIME MINISTER BENAZIR BHUTTO WHO CHOSE TO STAY AWAY, MADE SEVERAL CLEAR REFERENCES TO THE DISPUTE ABOUT KASHMIR. IN ONE INSTANCE, HE BLAMED SOUTH ASIA'S FAILURE TO KEEP UP WITH THE PACE OF GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT ON, IN HIS WORDS, ISSUES THAT ARE A LEGACY OF THE COLONIAL ERA.

                        // LEGHARI ACT //

         WE MUST NOT DELUDE OURSELVES INTO BELIEVING THAT ALL
         IS WELL. THE FACT IS THAT OUR ASSOCIATION HAS NOT
         TAKEN OFF. THE SUSPICIONS AND INSECURITY GENERATED BY
         THE UNSETTLED POLITICAL ISSUES IN OUR REGION STAND IN
         THE WAY OF SAARC MOVING FORWARD AT THE PACE THAT IT
         SHOULD.

                          // END ACT //

IN ANOTHER SWIPE AT INDIA, PRESIDENT LEGHARI SAID PAKISTAN WOULD ACCEPT A REGIONAL BAN ON NUCLEAR WEAPONS, SOMETHING INDIA HAS LONG OPPOSED AS UNFAIR. BOTH COUNTRIES ARE THOUGHT TO BE NUCLEAR-CAPABLE, AND NEITHER IS A PARTY TO ANY NON-PROLIFERATION AGREEMENT.

SRI LANKAN PRESIDENT CHANDRIKA KUMARATUNGA USED HER SPEECH TO LASH OUT AT ETHNIC TAMIL REBELS WHO HAVE RECENTLY RESUMED THEIR WAR FOR A SEPARATE HOMELAND IN THE NORTHERN PART OF THE ISLAND NATION. DEVIATING FROM THE PUBLISHED TEXT OF HER SPEECH, SHE WARNED OF THE DANGER OF TERRORISM.

                      // KUMARATUNGA ACT //

         THE PROBLEMS OF POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND TERRORISM CANNOT
         BE SOLVED WITH ONLY LAWS AND REGULATIONS. THE POVERTY
         AND SOCIAL INEQUALITY IN OUR SOCIETIES, WHICH ARE THE
         UNDERLYING CAUSES OF THIS PHENOMENON, HAVE TO BE
         ERADICATED IF WE ARE TO PREVENT POLITICAL VIOLENCE AND
         TERROR FROM BECOMING A DISEASE LETHAL TO THE VERY
         EXISTENCE OF OUR SOCIETIES.

                          // END ACT //

PRESIDENT KUMARATUNGA WILL MISS THE FINAL TWO DAYS OF THE THREE DAY SUMMIT BECAUSE OF HER COUNTRY'S ETHNIC CONFLICT. DURING A 30-MINUTE MEETING TUESDAY WITH INDIAN PRIME MINISTER RAO, THE SRI LANKAN LEADER SAID THE RECENT ESCALATION OF HOSTILITIES BY TAMIL REBELS HAD MADE HER PRESENCE IN SRI LANKA IMPERATIVE. (SIGNED)

02-May-95 11:18 AM EDT (1518 UTC) Source: Voice of America

******************************************************************* Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 11:11:12 -0400 From: rshresth@black.clarku.edu (RaJesh B. Shrestha) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Question about word "Asian"

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

mousaka@sallie.wellesley.edu wrote:

: From: brendzel@pegasus.rutgers.edu (Rachel Brendzel)

: >For the first time in my life, a few weeks ago, I got a somewhat
: >satisfying answer on why the word "Oriental" is no longer
: >considered polite. The answer was "Oriental" evokes images of
: >opium dens in the mysterious Orient. Okay. Not great, but at
: >least lucid.

: >But what I'm wondering is, isn't the word "Asian" an over-broad
: >misnomer for Pacific/Asian/Oriental people? I mean, Asian means
: >someone from Asia. Turkey is in Asia. Israel is in Asia.
: >Most of Russia is in Asia. I don't think these groups are what
: >people have in mind when they say "Asian". That's why I think
: >we should stick with the word "Oriental".

The word 'Asian' as used in the U.S. Media, Government, Agencies, Organizations, Universities refer to people who can trace their ancestry back to these three regions: 1) The Far East, 2) South East Asia, and 3) The Indian Subcontinent. Thus, these would be the following countries:

North East Asia - Japan, China (excluding Tibet), Hong Kong,
                    Taiwan, South Korea, North Korea, Macau,
                    Mongolia, Ryukyu Islands

South East Asia - Vietnam, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia,
                    Singapore, Malaysia, Phillipines, Brunei,
                    Myanmar
                     South Asia - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka,
                    Nepal, Bhutan, Maldives, Tibetan part of China

Central Asia, Middle East, and the part of the former Soviet Union in the continent of Asia is not considered to be
"Asian" as used in U.S. media, government, agencies, organizations, universities, etc. It is very clear, then , that Israel, Turkey, and Russia are not considered to be "Asian" in this sense. However, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Maldives, India, and Nepal are generally considered to be "Asian", even though they don't have a 'Mongoloid' or 'Oriental' population. Although North East India and many parts of North India and half of Nepal and basically all of Bhutan and Tibetan part of China have 'Mongoloid' or 'Oriental' population...they are still 'Asian' even though they are part of South Asia.

Basic Rule of Thumb: In America if a person is 'Oriental' or someone who looks like they are from India, then they are considered to be 'Asian'. If the person looks like they are from the Middle East, they are considered to be
'White', even though they came from the continent of Asia.

The reason for this classification is based on the idea that 'Orientals' and people from the Indian Subcontinent share a culture which shares a lot of common features; it is not a classification based on 'race' as much.

: "oriental" actually has historical connotations of imperialism. the
: arguments for "asian" instead of "oriental" have evolved around this
: concept, as far as i know. the "exotic opium den"-nonsense has come up
: once in a while, but has mostly been a secondary consideration.
: another relevant argument is that the term "asian" is a self-naming term,
: and as the logic goes, when you have the power to name yourself, you have
: the power to define yourself. hence, "oriental" as a term that westerners
: bestowed upon asians, is not a self-definitive, self-naming term.

: asian is definitely broad, which is why many people are now insisting upon
: specific identities, ie, japanese-american, vietnamese-american, instead of
: the all-inclusive asian-american. i personally prefer the term "asian" to
: "oriental", but will identify myself as japanese-american before all else.

: maiko

******************************************************************* Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 15:14:21 -0400 (EDT) From: Ashutosh Tiwari <tiwari@husc.harvard.edu> Subject: A broad answer to Swedish journalists' questions: To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

        There were questions from journalism-students (of Sweden) re: human rights, mental health, Arun III, child labor, freedom of press, freedom of speech and so forth.

        Thankfully, there are many Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), conveniently located right in Kathmandu, specializing on each of those issues and more. [At one count, last year, there were 15 active NGOs in Kathmandu for human rights alone!]

        May I recommend that an excellent resource-person in Kathmandu on NGOs would be Mr. Keshab Poudel.

        Mr. Poudel, who has studied journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and worked for a newspaper in Wisconsin on a fellowship, is a veteran reporter for both the state-run Nepali daily Gorkhapatra and the privately-run SPOTLIGHT (English) weekly newsmagazine.

        SPOTLIGHT's phone number in Kathmandu is: 410772; fax: 410845

        At SPOTLIGHT, there are also other well-known journalists such as Mr. Sushil Sharma, Mr. Binod Bhattarai and Mr. Bhagirath Yogi -- all of whom speak excellent English, are friendly and more than helpful to students.

namaste ashu

******************************************************************* Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 19:48:51 -0400 (EDT) From: SURAJ BASNET <sbasnet@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu> To: Nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: New Store in Baltimore -- Providing 50% Discount to Nepalese

The Nepali Community in Baltimore joins together in congratulating entrepreneurs Babu Ram Sharma and Rabvindra Pradhan for establishing the first Nepali-owned store in Baltimore. Pizza Roller, which officially opened on May 9, 1995, is a haven for conventional American food, but it also proudly maintains a fine selection of popular Indian dishes.

If you are in the area, or if you need an alibi to visit Baltimore, the owners have volunteered to provide a 50% discount for Nepalese (of course, anybody who is affiliated with the country in one form or other is included). The store is located minutes away from major attractions, such as the Orieles Stadium at Camden Yards, the Inner Harbor, the Science Museum and the world renowned Johns Hopkins Hospital, and an hour away from the White House, the Library of Congress and the Nepalese Embassy.

Come one, come all. Congratulate the owners and enjoy the generous discounts.

Suraj Basnet Johns Hopkins University Baltimore [The City that Reads]

                        BABU RAM SHARMA
                        PIZZA ROLLER
                        3200 PULASKI HIGHWAY
                        BALTIMORE, MD 21287
                        (410) 522-6036

************************************************************************** Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 20:49:04 -0400 From: CTHAPA@aol.com To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Subject: Re: #1(4) The Nepal Digest - ...

It was interesting to read about the status of Nepali women under the civil code of Nepal. If the husband dies and there are no children, and the deceased husband has living brothers and nephews, who would be entitled to the deceased husband's property, the wife or the relatives?

******************************************************************* Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 21:36 EST From: ATULADHAR@vax.clarku.edu To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

Cowslaughter in Nepal
=====================

Padma Ratna Tuladhar has got into a lot of fire for his human rights opinion that non-Hindu Nepali citizens should be allowed to slaughter cows to eat beef and that the laws must be changed to allow that.

"gai marna paidaina, padma ratna chahi daina" so the slogan goes, a India news agency United Press of India (UPI) reports, the Indian press is playing to Indian crowds and so the news is spiked to read, "the narrow lanes, gallies, of kathmandu are full of banners against Padma Ratna. Earlier another Indian news agencies, Hindu, newspaper quoted a news that Padman RAtna had already resigned over this issue and a lot of TND readers lost some sleep debating the merits of this supposed resignation. Indian news obviously have a lot of masala to spice up Hindu readers in India.

I doubt if more than a fringe of rightist Hindus, some close to power as represented by paper Nepal Patra, a pro-Panche paper close to Royalty and rightist hindu fundamentalism of Yogi Naraharinath, the religiosu spy of King Mahendra, is riled up over the cowslaughter issue.

Cowslaughter issue in Nepal is akin to gay issue in US military, don't ask don't tell. That is cowslaugther and beef eating is fine in modern Nepal and modern kathamandu provided you do not make a hue and cry over it.

For almost 20 years, specialty fresh houses that cater to the diplomatic crowd have been selling imported beef from Calcutta. Now it is said, customers want fresh beef not one refrigerated for god knows how long from Calcutta so cowslaughter goes on surreptiously in Kathmandu and Terai to meet the needs of the Tourist crowd. The Five Star enclaves need not follow Hindu kingdom rules, just this Jan I enjoyed a juicy steak of real beef, not buffalo beef, at Hotel Shangrila and I have heard beef was regularly served in all the fancy hotes of Kathmandu.

Similary, I have read many stories in Indian and nepali papers that large scale cow poisioning goes on in Tarai goes on so that these animals are used for leather industry in Calcutta and kanpur!

Nepal is the only place where cowslaughter is equal to manslaughter in terms of punishment it invites, this is akin to forcing every body to be a Hindu, whatever happened to individual human rights, that animal rights precede human rights?

*********************************************************************** Date: Wed, 10 May 1995 23:17:11 +0000 From: deschene@JHUVMS.HCF.JHU.EDU (Mary Des Chene) Subject: Response to Karmacharya on "dirty Kathmandu" To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu

In the 9 May TND, Dibesh Bikram Karmacharya wrote: This is in response to the article "The dirty kathmandu(?)" by Abana onta Mr. Onta people like you are not welcome in Kathmandu..If you dislike Kathmandu so much(well it seems your article suggests that you dislike KTM) just do not go there and KTM will be clean..WE are sick of your quotes and big mouth..no offense.. Thank you..
***

Abana Onta is a woman not a man. The article, Kathmandu's Dirty History, which appeared first in the Kathmandu Post (so at least some in Kathmandu welcomed it, it seems) was posted to TND with her permission by her brother. It is her first posting, so it seems unfair to describe her as having a "big mouth" (and wasn't there recently a call for more Nepali women to contribute?). It was not posted by the author because she does not have access to TND; Ms. Onta lives in Kathmandu. Dibesh Karmacharya says
(speaking for all residents in absentia?) that she is not welcome there and interprets her article to express a dislike of the city. To speak of pollution in Kathmandu and its effects on health, whether in TND or in the Kathmandu Post is hardly a revelation; this is not some secret scandal she has made public. Trying to understand Karmacharya's remarks, it seems he suggests that only celebratory remarks about Kathmandu should be posted or publicized. It also seems that he equates discussion of problems with dislike; the city is not perfect = I hate the city. I would suggest instead that often those who love the cities in which they live are the most penetrating critics of the imperfections of their homes. But in any case, my understanding of the essay was that it was a preliminary historical exploration of what *others have said* about the sanitary conditions of Kathmandu in the past, prefaced by some remarks about the present. Two points seem to be implied: first, that pollution problems should not be assumed to be a new phenomenon, and second, that current problems will be better understood when placed in historical context. As the author says, that history remains to be written, but I fail to understand why pointing out that it might be a good idea, should make one unwelcome in one's own city. Dibesh Karmacharya says that Kathmandu would be clean without her, but ends by saying "no offense". I cannot speak for Ms. Onta, but I cannot read this remark as anything but offensive.

Mary Des Chene

******************************************************************** Date: Thu, 11 May 1995 09:25:08 -0400 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Karma at the popular level From: parajuli@scws31.harvard.edu (Dilip Parajuli)

        In Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita we find the classical expressions of rituals-the sacrifices and offerings to gods, ancestors and seers, rebirth- the theory of transmigration, karma- the sum of one's actions in this world which determine one's next birth, dharma- one's social and moral duties, and mokshya- salvation from samsar(cycle of births and deaths). My question is: How well is the textual concepts of rebirth, karma and salvation reflected in the actual practice or everyday life? More succintly, how can we expalin the dominance of vedic rituals and ordinary householder's life over the ascetic life, for which the Upnishads give so much importance?
         Answers, either from knowledge or experience, will be appreciated. In particular, I am looking for responses that might be able to explain the extent of literary(the religious texts) influence on the Popular Hinduism at a typical Nepalese village( of course the aryan community).

***********************************************************************************************

*********************************************************************************************** Date: Thu, 11 May 1995 09:29:25 -0400 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Desh Pradesh South Asian Festival From: sgupta@dial.uwaterloo.ca (Suneel Gupta)

Shameless plug for an incredible unique event...

Desh Pardesh Festival/Conference 1995 Program Guide Toronto, Canada, May 9th-May 14th, 1995

Once again the South Asian festival known as Desh Pradesh is on in Toronto. Desh provides a unique forum for South Asians to display their art works, voice their concerns, meet with other like minded South Asians and have a whopping good time. Ticket prices for this year's festival are: Festival Pass $40 - Gives you assured entrance to all events (except for Bhangra Desh! the fundraising dance), single event tickets $6, double event tickets $10. It is definately money well spent. Though you should phone the Desh Pradesh offices for more information regarding the events or for which events are ticketed. The address and number are.... Suite 607, 96 Spadina Ave., Toronto, Ontario, M5V 2J6, ph. (416)504-9932.

Desh offers something for everyone. Below is a summary of the events scheduled.

(note: though this comes to you via email, I cannont be responsible for the accuracy or responding back to questions asked)
  Tuesday May 9:
============== Visual Art Exhibit " Against the Wall", 7-9pm, Gallery 401, 401 Richmond St., Suite 240: gallery exhibit of multidisciplinary visual art by South Asian artists living in the diaspora. The work of 16 artists from Canada and US are featured.
  Wednesday May 10:
=================
-Play Reading 'Delicate Essence Cafe', 12 noon-3 pm, 519 Church St., East Room : A play by Uma Kali Shakti about the lives of five women of black/non-English speaking backgrounds from different cultures and classes who are living in Sydney (Australia) in the 90s.
 
-Book Launch: Aurat Durbar Time: 4 - 6 pm, 519 Church St., East Room
 
-Trace the Race, 7:00 pm - 9:30pm , YMCA Mainspace: A collection of work (readings, dance performance and video) that traces the history of the South Asian communities in the West and looks at the variations of contemporary lived experience.
  Thursday, May 11
================
-Writing Workshop, 11-1 pm, Desh Pardesh office 96 Spadina Ave, #607: The writer's workshop/sweatshop is open to all who are interested in exploring writing as a medium of expression and creativity. The workshop is open to new and unpublished writers as well as
'established' writers who are looking to explore new avenues of inspiration.
 
-Forum: WOMEN'S GATHERING ON SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION, 2-5 pm, 519 Community Centre: This event grew from the voices of South Asian women needing a safe space to discuss sexual assault and abuse. It offers a variety of points of entry for participation or simply, observation for all women of South Asian descent.
 
-Women's Drumming Jam Session, 5-6pm, 519 Centre - Room 34: Get down-get spiritual - get into the groove... Bring your rattle, your drum, your tin- can and spoons - Come and get creative - no experience necessary!
 
-Festival Program: Nagara Into Chutney:150 Years of Indo-Caribbean Presence, 7-8:30 pm, YMCA Mainspace: Nagara Into Chutney features an array of song, dance and performance which have a distinct diasporic content, reflecting the varied experiences of Indo-Caribbean people since they first left India for the Caribbean in 1838.
 
-Shifting Ground, 9 pm, YMCA Mainspace: Memories, diaspora, transitions, journeys, home - these are the catalysts for Shifting Ground, a program that examines how we negotiate between individual and communtity memories and the "other", the 'hegemonic' culture we encounter in our travels. Events include: dance: Loud Sounds, Soft Steps & Silent Cries. reader: Raj Pannu reads her poetry film: (Dia)Sporadic: (Sudipto Chatterjee, New York, 1994, 6 min) theatre: Scenes from a Feminist India. video: Darwish: (Shafeeq Vellani, UK, date, 12 min) reader: Amitav Ghosh: renowned writer, reads from In an Antique Land.
 
  Friday, May 12:
===============
-Lesbian/Bisexual Caucus/Breakfast, 10:30 am-12:30 pm, The Oasis This space is open to Lesbians and Bisexual women to discuss issues of mutual concern as well as share strategies and strengths to move forward.
 
-Dance workshop, 1- 3 pm, Metro Central YMCA: This workshop, through the use of drama, voice, utterance and sound, movement, breath patterns and energy cycles, is designed to work with persons with or without physical training. We will work with breath, weight sharing, supporting our weight and protecting ourselves when we fall. We will work processually through yogic principles and relaxation exercises in order to prepare our bodies and minds.
 
-Visual Arts Workshop, 2-4 pm, Desh Pardesh Offices 96 Spadina Ave #607, Facilitated workshop that asks 'How does identity and politics manifest itself in your work?' Participants will engage in discussions around their experiences as artists, activists, critics and curators.
 
-Lesbian Flirtation Techniques Workshop, 4 - 6 pm, 519 Community Centre: This two hour workshop is open to self-identified lesbian and bisexual women only. Maximum 30. The first to come will be the first served, leave your names at the Desh office. Pre-register @ 416-504-9932.
 
-Gay Men's Discussion Group 4 - 6 pm, 519 Community Centre In our mind's eye: Brown and Sexy. A discussion group for South Asian Gay and Bisexual Men on erotica. Looking at the lack of representation, the lack of brown bodies in mainstream erotic imagery and the importance of seeing ourselves in erotica.
 
-Festival Program: On the Frontlines: Workers of Colour Organize for the Future, 7-9pm, YMCA Mainspace, Directly from the frontlines of labour organizing, this program focuses on how South Asian workers, especially women, are fighting back and turning the traditional labour movement upside down and inside out. Events include
 
-Who's Sari Now, 9 pm, YMCA Mainspace, With global restructuring and the right wing agendas of most of the world's governments, women are receiving the fallout - increased unemployment, poverty and violence. In this climate it is even more imperative that women's voices be heard. Perfomances lash out against this trend. Events include: readers: Writers from Sami Yoni performance: Betrothal: shatters the myth of the 'traditional woman's role'. reader: Ginu Kamani reads from her new book entitled Junglee Girl. reader: Sunera Thobani: reads her poetry. presentation: Labismina: issues of child sexual assault
 
-Women's Party and Boys Night Out, addresses TBA
 
  Saturday, May 13
================
-Women's Caucus/Breakfast, 9:30, location tba,An opportunity for women at Desh to dialogue, network and share experiences.

-Media Literarcy Workshop, 10am-1pm, Trinity Sq Video, 172 John St. 4th Fl;
 
-Panel: Breaking Down the Barricades,11am-1pm, 519 Community Centre, Activists respond to the global immigration backlash. Panelists include, Sheela Bhatt (International Institute of the East Bay, which has served immigrant and refugees for seventy-five years), Sunera Thobani (National Action Committee on the Status of Women), Amrit Wilson (South Asia Solidarity Group).
 
-Forum: AIDS Activist Meeting, 1-3pm, 399 Church St. Third Floor: Open discussion around issues that affect people living with HIV/AIDS and the barriers in doing education work within our communities. We need to advocate with infected and affected individuals to meet the support needs of our communities as well as address the larger social context that impedes long term health.

-Brown Skin, Red Ink!, 2- 5 pm, YMCA Mainspace: One of the gifts of being on the margins, as people of colour so often are in this society, is that we have a different perspective on the world. Brown Skin, Red Ink! celebrates young South Asian artists who pick up their pens and video cameras, step on stage, and break the silences around sexuality, racism, sexism, violence and identity.
 
-Into the Heart of Difference, 2-4 pm, 519 Community Centre, auditorium: Issues of intra-ethnic class/caste barriers, and attitudes towards race, especially in terms of inter-racial relationships, are seldom discussed.
 
-Narmada: A Valley Rises, 5-7pm, YMCA Mainspace: The renowned documentary details the December 1990 non-violent march from Madhya Pradesh to Gujarat to protest the building of a dam which threatened the homes of over 165,000 people in the Narmada Valley in India. Panel disscussion to follow. Panelists include film maker Ali Kazimi, Yogesh Varhade (founder Ambedkar Centre for Justice and Peace), Himani Bannerji (professor Department of Sociology at York University)
 
-Queer Desi Affairs!, 7:30 pm, YMCA Mainspace, A series of performances dealing with matters of sexual identity. Events include: performance: Sister Gets Married. theatre: Compromising Positions presentation: Prairie Pakis and Chutney Charades. video: Destiny/Desire/Devotion: (Zahed Dar, UK, 1994, 6 min). reader: Sandip Roy: Journalist/writer/activist, reads from his creation Black and Blue. theatre: GYNeSPEAK V: Pink Fur Titillation.
 
-Bhangra Workshop, 9:30 pm, Metro Central YMCA
 
-Desh Dance: Bhangra Desh!, 10:00 pm, YMCA Mainspace: It's our annual Desh Pardesh Fundraising Dance.
 

Sunday, May 14
==============
-The Art of Work/A Work of Art, 11-1 pm, YMCA Mainspace: a forum which invites workers, activists and artists to share experiences of working together. This forum consists of a screening of Vivek Bald's Taxi/vala Auto/biography, followed by a discussion with Vancouver Sath playwright Sadhu Binning, film-maker Ali Kazimi and others.
 
-Panel: Defining the Margins, 1-3pm, YMCA Mainspace: Editorial collective members from some of the most exciting small, progressive, politicized South Asian publications in Canada and the US look at the role their magazines and periodicals play in the media scrum that is developing within the larger South Asian community.
 
-Forum: Ready Willing and Differently Abled-South Asians Living with Disabilities, 1-3pm, Metro Central YMCA: A panel which aims to challenge our stereotypes, prejudices and attitudes around persons living with disabilities from the South Asian communities.
 
-Annual General Meeting, 3 - 5 pm, Metro Central YMCA, The Annual General Meeting of Desh Pardesh occurs on the last day of the festival. We will be electing a new Board, planning for next year and voting on new by-laws. Buy your Desh membersship now.
 
-Closing Night..Avec Pyar..., 7 pm, YMCA Mainspace : One last hurrah before we ready ourselves for what lies out there. Events include: reader: Sadhu Binning dance: Ananya Chaterjea reader: Rajinderpal S. Pal presentation: Ramabai Espinet: Lovesong for the year 2000. reader: Writers Cabaret music: Dhamak: Bhangra musicians at the heart of their beat

********************************************************************* Date: 11 May 95 09:56:48 EDT From: Rajendra.P.Shrestha@Dartmouth.EDU (Rajendra P. Shrestha) Subject: News5/7-10 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

May 7 PM says government will help carpet industry Excerpts from Radio Nepal and Xinhua reports

   Prime Minister Man Mohan Adhikari has said that it would be merely an unnecessary publicity drive on the part of European countries to raise child labour issues and thereby discourage Nepal's carpet industry, forgetting their own extensive use of child labour during the Industrial Revolution. Prime Minister Adhikari made this remark while inaugurating the fifth annual general meeting of the central Carpet Industry Association in Kathmandu today [7th May].

   Prime Minister Adhikari said he is not an advocate of child labour but it would not be a crime to provide good working conditions and provide means of livelihood to children living on footpaths, using discarded papers for quilts and mattresses.

   Expressing his disagreement with the view the growing of pollution in Kathmandu was due to the carpet industry, Mr Adhikari said the carpet industries firmly established in Kathmandu should be run in a planned manner. He remarked it would be economically and scientifically unwise to displace these carpet industries from Kathmandu at once.

   On the occassion, Tasi P. Lama, acting chairman of the Carpet Industry Association, said that carpet industry contributes some 10 billion rupees (200 million US dollars) worth of foreign exchange and 200 million rupees (4 million US dollars) in terms of export fees to the national treasury annually. But the industry has recently suffered a 31-percent decrease in its export mainly due to the child labor issue in the sector.

 May 8 RNAC Investigation Panel Disbanded UPI report

   Two members of a three-person panel investigating corruption allegations against former Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala have resigned, officials said Monday.

   The Ministry of Tourism announced that the chief of the administrative commission, Gajendra Mani Pradhan, and another member, Mukunda Shrestha, had quit, forcing the government to disband the panel. The ministry statement said Pradhan resigned because he
''could not give an impartial verdict'' on the charges of corruption leveled by the communist government against Koirala, who now heads the main opposition party.

   Koirala refused to testify before the commission last week, saying the panel was illegal and could not be impartial. The former premier said Pradhan had been dismissed by his government two years before and thus was biased against him. The Supreme Court is considering a petition filed by Pradhan challenging his dismissal by the Koirala government.

   Ram Hari Joshi, who served as minister of tourism in Koirala's government, also has filed a petition with the Supreme Court, challenging the legality of the commission. Koirala contends the current government is pursuing a political vendetta against him.

   The communist government has accused Koirala of giving sweeping monopoly rights to a London-based Indian, Dinesh Dhamija, to represent the state-owned Royal Nepal Airlines in Europe. The communists contend the airline has incurred a $20 million loss because of the flawed deal, which has been scrapped by the current government.

   The resignation of the two commission members is a major victory for the former prime minister, who has launched a nationwide campaign against the 5-month-old minority government and is threatening to topple it in Parliament.

   Pradhan said that despite his resignation, another panel should be formed to investigate the airline deal. ''Preliminary findings indicate Royal Nepal Airlines will collapse in six months if corrective measures are not immediately taken to stop irregularities,'' he said. Pradhan said he resigned because questions were raised about the objectivity of the commission. ''The commission was a perfectly legal body,'' he said. ''I resigned only because doubts were raised about the impartiality of the commission.''

Sherpa Guide Killed in fall on Everest Excerpts from UPI report

   A Sherpa guiding an American expedition attempting to climb Mount Everest tumbled 655 feet to his death this weekend, but the team pressed on in its attempt to scale the world's tallest peak, Nepalese officials said Monday.

   Kami Rita Sherpa, 23, fell Saturday while the group was 22,965 feet up the 29,028-foot mountain, the Ministry of Tourism said. He died instantly. The body was recovered and brought to a base camp on Sunday. The 10-member American team continued with the climb, the ministry said. The group, an environmental clean-up expedition, was being led by Randy Burleson, 36, a mountain guide from Woodinville, Wash.

   Meanwhile, an Italian expedition attempting to climb the world's third highest peak encountered bad weather and was forced to turn back on April 30. The seven-member group, led by Simone Moro, 28, made it up 26,247 feet of the 28,170-foot-high Kangchenjunga before it had to abandon the climb, the ministry said.

************************************************************** Date: Thu, 11 May 1995 11:36:11 -0400 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Cowslaughter in Nepal: happens all the time... From: rshresth@black.clarku.edu (RaJesh B. Shrestha)

I agree with Amulya's main thesis that non-Hindus should not be required to follow Hindu practices but I do not feel comfortable with his arguments.

Amulya argues that although cow slaughter is illegal in Nepal, it happens a lot and therefore it should be legal. Such an outright judgment would also mean that murder, rapes, etc. etc. be legal because they happen all the time and are now considered illegal.

I happen to believe that Nepal's cow slaughter law reflects the sentiments of the majority of people and that is why it continues to be in place. If we had a referendum today, a direct democracy practice, asking people if they would like to keep or remove the law, it is obviously going to be passed in favor of retaining the law. That's how democracy is -- it favors the majority, no matter how senseless it is.

If we were to analyze the insistence of Hindus to keep the cow sacred, basically it comes down to faith and senstivity -- all these are irrational and therefore hard to argue over. At this moment in time, we have to face it. Hindus in Nepal, a declared Hindu kingdom, with about 90% of inhabiting Hindus regard cows deeply and are sensitive about it. That makes perfect sense to me. Time is just not ready to change that in Nepal. Rationally speaking, I am very much eager to let non-Hindus as they please. That would be an ideal situation, but, as of now, cow-slaughtering hurts the Hindu people, seemingly at least, considering the reactionary outpouring against Padma Ratna Tuladhar recently. So perhaps, Padma Ratna's idea, very much logical and supportable, is not attuned to the time and people's sentiments. I am constantly putting time in reference here because times are bound to change and so will people's sentiments. As we become a *more* open-minded society, such militant opposition would seem absurd (to many of us, it already does; but I am not sure how Hindus in Nepal feel it) and generate its own opposition.

To my knowledge, at this moment, cow slaughter is illegal in Nepal, but consumption of beef is not. So one may import beef from India, wherever, and consume it as they do in hotels. Non-hindus in Nepal at least have this option open to them. If Amulya disagrees with the quality of imported taste, I think the problem can be rectified with a more organized system of trade!

As we all know, in this precarious moments of economic and political stability in Nepal, religious disharmony is the last thing we could want. It would only promote militancy and gain no beneficial outcome, at this time.

Feel free to comment.

***************************************************************** Date: Thu, 11 May 1995 11:55:26 -0400 (EDT) From: Ashutosh Tiwari <tiwari@husc.harvard.edu> Subject: Comments on PM's recent statements To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

> Prime Minister Man Mohan Adhikari has said that it would be merely
>an unnecessary publicity drive on the part of European countries to
>raise child labour issues and thereby discourage Nepal's carpet
>industry,

        Economists in Nepal have already pointed out -- with data, numbers and analyses -- that the "publicity" of child-labor have/had NEGLIGIBLE effect on the demand of Nepali carpets in Europe. The most likely causes for the falling demand were/are OTHER factors, also pointed out by Neal Cohen and Pratyoush Onta in past TND issues.

         The PM only needs to hire a competent economist to hear the most-likely-to-be-true story, rather than repeating this kind of myths in public.

>forgetting their own extensive use of child labour during
>the Industrial Revolution.

        Perhaps. But Nepalis live in late 20th century; not in circa 1830. Anyhow, to say, on one hand, that Nepalis can demand and have 20th-century
[western-style liberal] democracy (with protected rights), WHILE subjecting their children to Industrial-Revolution type of (straight out of Charles Dickens' novels) meager existence is contradictory, coming, as it does, from the PM, the hailed freedom-fighter. Or, has the PM now put his principles in his pocket to appease the carpet-businessmen?
        

> Prime Minister Adhikari said he is not an advocate of child labour
>but it would not be a crime to provide good working conditions and
>provide means of livelihood to children living on footpaths, using
>discarded papers for quilts and mattresses.

        
        Sure, rather than acknowledge the FAILURE of the state to take care of these children, the PM can go ahead and solace himself by saying:
'these children are earning their livelihoods, and that's a good thing.'

        Children of Nepal should be going to school, not working in factories for pittance. What does the PM have to say about this? Should not his government be doing something about this? Or, as in the past, children are nobody's concern? Or, is it because children, being children, cannot vote and are therefore dispensible from larger realm of politics?

> Expressing his disagreement with the view the growing of pollution >in
Kathmandu was due to the carpet industry, Mr Adhikari said the >carpet industries firmly established in Kathmandu should be run in a >planned manner.

        Rubbish. How planned can this "planned manner" be? Who does this planning? On what basis? Still, "planned manner" for whom? For what?

>He remarked it would be economically and
>scientifically unwise to displace these carpet industries from
>Kathmandu at once.
        
        Of course. When these factories are NOT subjected to 'pollution tax' and are sanctinoned by the state to create such negative externalities as polluted water, bad working conditions and so on, why should they incur relocation costs?

        As for a scientific reason, the reason that Kathmandu has no running water (thanks to a high demand of water at nearby beer factories and 100s of carpet industries) is reason enough to look for ways to relocate them where there is, for a start, plenty of water.

> On the occassion, Tasi P. Lama, acting chairman of the Carpet
>Industry Association, said that carpet industry contributes some 10
>billion rupees (200 million US dollars) worth of foreign exchange and
>200 million rupees (4 million US dollars) in terms of export fees to
>the national treasury annually.

        I have no quarrel with those who make and sell carpets. They are businessmen out to make profits. And making profits is their job. But they cannot just be allowed to make profits at the EXPENSE of children
(there are no well-defined labor laws in Nepal) and at the EXPENSE of people's health. At the very least, these businessmen should PAY for those social costs. That these businessmen do both is to let them exploit all of us, which they will now do all the more, this time with the PM's blessing.

        At any rate, how ironic and disappointing that in his zeal to perhaps embrace capitalism (i.e. businesses) our communist PM seems NOT to have understood that the Invisible Hand of commerce needs the rule of laws and 'socially-desirable' policies to do the Visible Good.

        But, like everything else in Nepal, seniority breeds its own wisdom, and perhaps the PM was using that wisdom in ways I, a mere student, cannot fathom.

        Finally, lest anyone misunderstood: I certainly mean no disrespect to the PM; I am merely voicing my disagreements. That's all.

namaste ashu

****************************************************************** Date: Thu, 11 May 1995 11:21:08 -0700 (PDT) From: Dahal Durga <daha9014@uidaho.edu> To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - May 9, 1995 (26 Baishakh 2052 BkSm)

All right., try to learn, Lady Karmacharya was the first woman Pilot in Nepal, she learned that technology in Sawarmati Asram, somewhere, around 2007 vs, for war purposes. Thanks.

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