The Nepal Digest - July 13, 1995 (29 Ashadh 2052 BkSm)

From: The Editor (nepal-request@cs.niu.edu)
Date: Thu Jul 13 1995 - 15:59:58 CDT


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The Nepal Digest Thursday 13 July 95: Ashadh 29 2052 BkSm Volume 40 Issue 3

 ******************************************************************************
 * TND Board of Staff *
 * ------------------ *
 * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu *
 * TND Archives: Sohan Panta k945184@atlas.kingston.ac.uk *
 * *
 * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
 * *
 * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" -Dr. MLK *
 * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" - Sirdar Khalifa *
 * *
 ******************************************************************************

*********************************************************************** Date: 09 Jul 1995 23:06:48 EDT To: Rajpal <a10rjs1@cs.niu.edu> From: "Mr. Niranjan Basnyat" <102103.1700@compuserve.com> Subject: Message re: Nepal tourism promotion

The Nepalese Mission to the United Nations and the office of the Royal Nepalese Consulate General - New York, in cooperation with the local office of Royal Nepal Airlines, are organizing an event aimed at promoting tourism in Nepal on Wednesday, 12 July 1995 at hotel Intercontinental located at 111 East 48 St. between Lexington and Park Avenues. The event starts at 6:30p.m. A video presentation on Nepal followed by a reception is planned for the evening. It would be highly appreciated if you could kindly include this message in your next issue of TND as well as in the soc.culture.nepal and other tourism relate d forums/newsgroups. I have been experiencing some problems in terms of posting messages on various newsgroups. May be I am not doing it right. Therefore, would it be possible for you to e-mail me back after you receive this message. My address is 102103.1700@compuserve.com I may also be contacted at 212-370-4188.

Jai Nepal, Niranjan Basnyat Nepalese Mission to the UN

******************************************************************** Date: Fri, 07 Jul 95 21:38:55 EDT From: nsk4560 <NSK4560@SRUVM.SRU.EDU> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

     Some Thoughts About the Political situation in Nepal
     ====================================================

     Pro-democracy movement of 1990s is, indeed, one of the greatest events in Nepal's history. It shifted the power from monarchy to the common population (at least in theory, anyway), and from one-party system to multi-party system. The new system brought a light of hope in Nepalese life; but the Nepalese people are now afraid that this light, which they had thought of as a guiding light to development, is turning to become a mere illusion. Two untimely elections in a span of one year have shaken their beliefs.
     Needless to say, every election means millions of dollars in direct and indirect costs. For a poor nation like Nepal, where even a dollar makes a difference in its development, it is a high price to pay. Moreover, internal conflicts between the different political parties, and regular strikes have endangered the country's stability.
     It is time to look back and think again before making any drastic decision. Re-election alone does not solve the problem. Leaders of different political parties have to broaden their thinking, and they have to look beyond their personal interests and those of their parties; they have to identify their interest with that of the nation. Then, and only then, can we expect true development to occur.

      -- Niraja Karmacharya
         S.R. University of Pennsylvania

*********************************************************** Date: Fri, 07 Jul 95 21:41:23 EDT From: nsk4560 <NSK4560@SRUVM.SRU.EDU> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

           In Response to Nirmal Ghimirez' Comments...
           ========================================

     I agree with your statements, Mr. Nirmal Ghimirez, about Durga Dahal's recent posting "Election in Nepal so What ?" As a Nepali citizen, it is our responsibility to be aware of the changes that our country is going through, and to respond to those changes accordingly. We are in a foreign country; that does not change the fact that we love and care about our mother-land (at least some of us do anyway). Irresponsible phrases such as "Election in Nepal so What ?" hurt the sentiments of Nepalese who wish for the betterment of our country.
     Not that I am an advocate of censorship, but I believe that statements, like the ones mentioned above, are unwarranted, and the author would have been better off keeping the statement to himself.

     - Niraja Karmacharya
       SR University of Pennsylvania.

************************************************************** Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 03:16 EST From: ATULADHAR@vax.clarku.edu To: shrestha@arts.adelaide.edu.au, mack@shrsys.hslc.org,

Tragedy. Condolence. andAppeal
===============================

The apparent death by drowing of 21-year old Ramesh Mali, a Special Olympics soccer player, was a sad news for Nepalese here. He was last seen in chest deep water on Haonesset Beach, near New Haven Connecticut where he was taken with two other Nepalese by their host to have some "recreation". Ramesh Mali had never seen the sea before and he and the other 2 were scared as they were wading on the chest deep water at the edge of the falloff of the continental shelf, so the other 2 were accompanied to the shore by his host. When the host came back to get Mali, he had disappeared. Almost immediately, a full scale search was launched with the Coast guard frogmen combing the sea bottom but after 3 hours or so hopes for recovering him receded and a news conference was called, the tragedy has completely eclipsed news coverage of the Special Olympics.

This is a specially acute and difficult type of tragedy since the concept of drowing in the sea is such a difficult concept to swallow for Nepalese and the failure to locate the body in a land/ocean that is "saat samudra" away makes it very difficult to close this wound with a proper cremation rites for Nepalese. I want to express my heartfelt condolences to members of his family.

I also appeal that we do something to enable Ramesh's family to come here and pay their last respects. Please let us know how many are interested in maybe contacting the Special Olympics committee to arrange for this?

Amulya tuladhar Clark University Massachusetts

*************************************************************** From: ponta@sas.upenn.edu (Pratyoush R. Onta) Subject: (fwd) missing Nepali in Connecticut (fwd) To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu (tnd) Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 10:23:24 -0400 (EDT)

Agence France Presse, July 07, 1995
                                                                                 HEADLINE: Nepal footballer missing at Special Olympics

DATELINE: MADISON, Connecticut, July 6

 BODY:
   Ramesh Mali, a Special Olympics football player from Nepal, disappeared here Thursday while swimming at an unguarded beach area.

   Police and volunteers manned boats and helicopters in a frantic search for the 21-year-old sportsman, among 7,000 athletes from around the world participating in the Special Olympics.

   Mali was last seen in chest-deep water in the early afternoon, police said, adding that witnesses saw someone go under the water and fail to surface.

   Mali was on an outing with 11 other competitors from Nepal and four escorts, including a volunteer host. Police said the volunteer took two Nepali visitors to safety because they were nervous, then could not find Mali upon returning to the area.

The New York Times News Service

                         July 7, 1995 Friday, BC cycle

HEADLINE: VISITING ATHLETE DISAPPEARS DURING A SWIM

BYLINE: By GEORGE JUDSON

   STAMFORD, Conn. - Coast Guard and police helicopters and boats searched Long Island Sound Thursday for a Special Olympics athlete from Nepal who disappeared while swimming during a visit to Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison, Conn., authorities said.

   The 21-year-old mentally retarded man, whom The Associated Press identified as Ramesh Mali, was last seen about 12:15 p.m. in water up to his chest off a section of the 2.2-mile beach where lifeguards were not stationed, the authoriries said. Divers and other rescuers, assisted by two helicopters, the cutter Point Wells and several other boats, focused on a stretch of shore several hundred yards long.

   A land search was also under way. The Coast Guard described Mali as wearing black shorts and a white T-shirt.

   A state police spokesman, Sgt. Dale Hourigan, said Mali had been visiting the park with 11 other athletes from Nepal and several adults, including a Special Olympics volunteer serving as host to the country's team. Olympics organizers declined to identify what sport Mali was competing in.

  Hourigan said that Mali had been left in the water alone while the host was
...when the host returned.

   "A woman on the beach and some Special Olympics athletes were out there swimming and said they saw a person go down and didn't come up," the director of beach operations, Todd Rainey, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

   Swimming is supervised by lifeguards only on sections of the beach marked by green flags, although lifeguards walk the entire beach through the day. The Nepalese athletes were bathing in an unsupervised section marked by yellow flags, Hourigan said.

   Some 7,000 mentally retarded athletes from around the world are in the New Haven area this week to participate in the Special Olympics.

The New York Times News Service
                        July 8, 1995 Saturday, BC cycle

SECTION: DOMESTIC NEWS

LENGTH: 748 words

HEADLINE: SPECIAL OLYMPICS ATHLETE STILL NOT FOUND

BYLINE: By KIRK JOHNSON

 BODY:
   MADISON, Conn. - Hundreds of police officers, lifeguards and volunteers waded into cold chest-deep water for up to two hours Friday off the beach at Hammonasset State Park, holding hands to form a human chain in their search for a 21-year-old mentally retarded athlete from Nepal who disappeared on Thursday while taking a break from the Special Olympics World Games in nearby New Haven.

   Ramesh Mali, a soccer player, floundered and disappeared under the water about 60 yards offshore in Long Island Sound around noon Thursday, the state police said, and Friday morning the Coast Guard announced that it believes Mali is dead. The surface rescue effort was suspended just after 10 a.m. Friday, with divers and volunteers taking over the search for a body.

   Mali's disappearance, on a clear day on a white sand beach known more for its loud radios than its crashing waves or its undertow, clearly touched a chord in many people.

   Robert Staib from nearby Old Saybrook and his uncle, Lyle Parah, who is visiting from Vermont, heard the request for volunteers on their police scanner radio and drove to the park to pitch in and join the human chain. A team of Navy salvage divers, whose ship had just put into port at New Haven, also heard the call and arrived late Friday afternoon with their black inflatable boats and rubber suits.

   But there was apparently no one here who knew Mali, or could say a word about his life or how he came to be here, swimming in an unprotected area of the beach with no lifeguards nearby. There were many people clearly trying to do something worthwhile, and there were others with binoculars, drawn more by curiosity. Police walkie-talkies crackled on the boardwalk as helicopters droned overhead. But there were no tears.

 "You want to do something," Parah said. "Anything is worth a try."

   Luke Beatty was the nearest lifeguard at the point where Mali went down, and he said he was the first at the scene after he heard the shouts of distress while in his beach chair. A third-season veteran of the Hammonasset lifeguard team, which has not lost a swimmer to drowning since 1981, Beatty spent Friday morning in the water with the chain of searchers and said that all the volunteer help had been great.

   He said he had not seen the group that appeared to be 12 Nepalese athletes and their escorts until the crisis was upon him.

   Mali had never seen the sea, according to an Associated Press interview with his brother, Laxman Mali, from Katmandu, the Nepalese capital.

   "I can't tell you what happened," Beatty said as he leaned against the wall of the men's changing-room building, which had turned into an ad hoc search command post. When he was asked whether other swimmers were in the water nearby, a friend sitting next to Beatty snapped in anger, "He said he doesn't know any more than that."

 The park's supervisor, Roger Kinderman, said nine lifeguards were on duty on the 2.2 mile stretch of beach on Thursday, compared with 17 - the full park crew - that is on watch on weekends when the surf is filled with swimmers. The smaller crew concentrates on certain areas of the beach on weekdays and marks other sections with signs and tipped-over lifeguard chairs indicating unguarded waters.

   "They have to have a day off," Kinderman said of his lifeguard crew.

   Residents who have lived around these waters said they believed Mali's body could be far from the beach by now, or very close to where he went down in the murky gray water, but that in any case the unpredictable nature of the undercurrents means that with each passing hour, the size of the area where the body might be will continue to expand. As of late Friday afternoon, a two-mile section of the beach about one-eighth of a mile out into the water had been searched at least once.

   "He could be anywhere," said Lieut. Cliff M'Sadoques, the commander of State Police Troop F, which was coordinating the search.

   Some volunteers from the Special Olympics also stopped by the beach on their way home from the games, and said that Mali's disappearance, and inevitable questions about his supervision, were a major topic of conversation among officials and volunteers, but that the competition had gone on.

   The Nepalese soccer team, meanwhile, played its scheduled game against the Ivory Coast. After a moment of silence, witnessed by dignitaries including former Gov. Lowell Weicker Jr., the chairman of the Special Olympic World Games, play commenced. Team Nepal lost 6-0.

****************************************************** Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 12:42 EST From: ATULADHAR@vax.clarku.edu Subject: More on Mali tragedy: how he may have died To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

About Hammonasett State Park in MADISON, CT, I am very, very familiar with that wonderful beach site! It is fortunately, quite suburbanly far from New Haven, itself, in a very wealthy town of Madison. I guess a "finger" of evil from the distant city of my birth reached out and touched "someone." I am very sorry to hear of this event.

Being familiar with undertoes and other ocean currents, I imagine that the worst happened and I want you to know that it almost happend to me when I was a strong 19 year old, a competitive swimmer of note, and a lifeguard at the time I almost drowned in a current. So much worse for someone who isn't such a good swimmer! There are secrets I learned about currents AFTER I almost drowned in one.

Yours,
        Paul

************************************************************** Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 13:00 EST Forwarded By: ATULADHAR@vax.clarku.edu Subject: some light stuff of graduate study To: nepal@cs.niu.edu, shrestha@arts.adelaide.edu.au, mack@shrsys.hslc.org, From:JACK::PSTEINBERG "PHIL STEINBERG, CLARK U. GEOGRAPHY" 6-JUL-1995 To: @GEOGRAD Subj: fun stuff from Jeremy

Hey kids:

Jeremy sent this to me, and I think it warrants passing on to the masses....

The Top Ten Lies Told by Graduate Students
> (taken from the Harvard Crimson)
>
> 10. It doesn't bother me at all that my college roommate is making
> $80,000 a year on Wall Street
> 9. I'd be delighted to proofread your book/chapter/article.
> 8. My work has a lot of practical importance.
> 7. I would never date an undergraduate.
> 6. Your latest article was so inspiring.
> 5. I turned down a lot of great job offers to come here.
> 4. I just have one more book to read and then I'll start writing.
> 3. The department is giving me so much support.
> 2. My job prospects look really good.
> 1. No really, I'll be out of here in only two more years.
>
> Top Five Lies Told by Teaching Fellows:
>
> 5. I'm not going to grant any extensions.
> 4. Call me any time. I'm always available.
> 3. It doesn't matter what I think; write what you believe.
> 2. Think of the midterm as a diagnostic tool.
> 1. My other section is much better prepared than you guys.
>
> You just might be a graduate student if...
>
> ...you can analyze the significance of appliances you cannot operate.
> ...your carrel is better decorated than your apartment.
> ...you have ever, as a folklore project, attempted to track the
> progress of your own joke across the Internet.
> ...you are startled to meet people who neither need nor want to read.
> ...you have ever brought a scholarly article to a bar.
> ...you rate coffee shops by the availability of outlets for your laptop.
> ...everything reminds you of something in your discipline.
> ...you have ever discussed academic matters at a sporting event.
> ...you have ever spent more than $50 on photocopying while
> researching a single paper.
> ...there is a microfilm reader in the library that you consider "yours."
> ...you actually have a preference between microfilm and microfiche.
> ...you can tell the time of day by looking at the traffic flow at
> the library.
> ...you look forward to summers because you're more productive
> without the distraction of classes.
> ...you regard ibuprofen as a vitamin.
> ...you consider all papers to be works in progress.
> ...professors don't really care when you turn in work anymore.
> ...you find the bibliographies of books more interesting than
> the actual text.
> ...you have given up trying to keep your books organized and are
> now just trying to keep them all in the same general area.
> ...you have accepted guilt as an inherent feature of relaxation.
> .. you reflexively start analyzing those greek letters before you
> realize that it's a sorority sweatshirt, not an equation.
> ....you find yourself explaining to children that you are in "20th
> grade".
> ....you start refering to stories like "Snow White et al."
> ....you frequently wonder how long you can live on pasta without
> getting scurvy
> ....you look forward to taking some time off to do laundry
> ....you have more photocopy cards than credit cards
> ....you wonder if APA style allows you to cite talking to yourself as
> "personal communication"

************************************************************** Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 14:45:44 -0400 From: RBASNET@aol.com To: Nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Lost Nepalese Athlete

Ramesh Mali, a soccer player from Nepal, participating in Special Olympics in Connecticut, is not found yet. A local newspaper says, " Mali, 21, went to Hammonasset State Park, near New Haven (CT), on Thursday with 11 other Neplease athletes and four adults, including the volunteer host. The volunteer was in the water with three athletes, including Mali, at low tide and in calm surf when he took two swimmers back to shore because they seemed nervous. When the volunteer went back to for Mali, he was gone. Mali's family said he was on his first trip away from his country." A big search and rescued team is putting a lot of efforts to find him.
 Nothing came in hand so far. Now he is presumed to be drowned and dead. A sad news for Whole world and a great lost for Nepalese community. Wherever he is, God bless him.

Raj Basnet Springfield, MA

***************************************************************** Date: Sat, 08 Jul 95 19:28:15 EDT From: Nirmal Niroula <NNIRO00@UKCC.uky.edu> Subject: Address To: TND <nepal@cs.niu.edu>

Hello, everyone, Greetings!!!!! I was wondering whether people out there know t he e-mail address of HIMAL,the HIMALAYAN MAGAZINE, or KANAK DIXIT, the Editor o f the Magazine? I am banking heavily on folks from University of PENN , because from what I have heard, someof the students at the UPENN were associated with t he Magazine. As for me, I am a Ph. D student in sociology at U.K. (It is a sinn
 to say University of Kentucky, because folks here do not like people who prefe r to pronounce the University's name in full form, because of the nationally (?
) known Basketball team. Any way, happy to say hello, and waiting for the answe r anxiously. Thanks. Nirmal Niroula.

**************************************************************** To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Subject: Nepal WILL change in the next 10/20 years Date: Sat, 08 Jul 1995 20:04:24 EDT From: Shreekrishna Pandey <skpandey@MIT.EDU>

Dear Rajpaljee, if you have received a copy of this article(I sent a copy about a week ago!) already please disregard it. Else, can you fit it in the next issue? Thanks!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This is in response to some recent postings on the internet declaring that Nepal will not change in the coming decade or two. The discussion was originally started by Pratyoush Onta's posting of a news piece in which a Japanese tourist was reported to have preferred Vietnam over Nepal as her travel destination for the above mentioned reason. There were rather pessimistic comments by fellow netters like Ajay Pradhan.

Considering the present political chaos and what have been achieved so far after the restoration of democracy, there are reasons to believe that this limbo will continue. Then comes the inevitable comparison of democracy and Panchayat system, in terms of achievements. People who are nostalgic about the stability of panchayat days will be hard to appease in that respect. It is true we love democracy and are glad that it has been restored, but is it not time that we expect economic relief and not merely hear our leaders harp on democracy's merits and their contribution to its restoration?

We have waited quite a while in the hope of seeing 'nepal ko bikas' through our beloved democratically elected governments. All in vain, unfortunately. It should now be reasonably clear that either the leaders - and hence the government - are totally clueless on where to start from, or they do not know where to get the money, or worse even they are not interested in seeing development of the country as long as their party manages to grab power. I feel it is now time that we stopped blaming the government and expecting everything from that machinery. Simple and clear: the government will not do it.

There are enough people like you and me, who have acquired certain skills or are in the process, who CAN make a difference. Should we not go back and start opening momo chains and garbage disposal companies? Can we not give "hoste ma hainse" to many promising software companies in Nepal that are trying to compete internationally? Maybe we should stop depending on Khanepani Samsthan for water and Bidhyut Pradhikaran for bijuli, and try to find alternatives. Do we lack skills to do so? Definitely not! And who says we don't have enough money? Lack of investment opportunities have forced us to land our money in buying 'char ana jagga' at Baneswar or Ring Road. One needs only look at how eager people are to purchase shares of Gorakhkali Rubber or Himalayan Bank to see how much INTERNAL sources are flowing down the Karnali untapped.

India - with one of the fastest growing economies in Asia - has taken the leading role in South Asia and will continue to do so for years to come. With open borders in the south, east and west, Nepal can enjoy a lot from economic development in India. We have to wake up from that era of distrust, and realize that the key is co-operation. It is true that in India, the government itself is actively pursuing the economic liberalization program started by the bold and innovative finance minister Man Mohan Singh. We lag behind in that respect. Our leaders just do not have the vision to do so, or even if they do they are too suspicious, too reluctant to let go of the government's hold in many areas. We can protest against such gross indifference and hinderance from the goverment. There are recent examples of such challenges of policies and decision making processes in the government. Some time ago, half a dozen self-committed volunteers of the Alliance for Energy who are professionals in their fields and have supporting data to argue their case, questioned the whole process of commisioning of Arun III. This forced the government, which, not being used to such reasoned opposition left no stone unturned in branding those dedicated individuals with all sorts "bikas-ko-birodhi" titles, to listen to opposition. Hopefully, that incident will serve as an eye-opener for planners in forming future policies about energy.

My whole point is that we can make a difference. We will have to return and devote our total commitment to that cause. It will be very hard. We might lose patience, but it is not impossible. When we feel we can do something constructive that will make a difference we should go back and explore it.

Finally, thanks to Pratyoush and Ajay for starting discussion on the topic. I might have diverged from the original question while writing this article. If you judge so, my advanced apologies. I certainly hope others will join discussion.

Shree Krishna Pandey MIT Cambridge, Mass.

***********************************************************************************************

*********************************************************************************************** Date: Sat, 8 Jul 1995 22:13:37 -0500 To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu From: psharma@emh1.tic.bismarck.nd.us (Padam Sharma) Subject: More on the missing special olympian..

7/6/95 8:14 PM=7F Special Olympian from Nepal Missing
=7F=7F=7F By CHRISTINE HANLEY

Associated Press Writer

MADISON, Conn. (AP) - A Special Olympics athlete from Nepal disappeared Thursday while swimming in an unguarded section of beach, prompting a massive search by boats, helicopters, divers and scores of volunteers.

Ramesh Mali, a 21-year-old soccer player, was last seen in chest-deep water in Long Island Sound shortly after noon, authorities said.

"A woman on the beach and some Special Olympic athletes were out there swimming and said they saw a person go down and didn't come up," said Todd Rainey, director of beach operations.

Divers and other rescuers were searching an area of several hundred yards off the shore of Hammonasset State Park. Plans were under way to drag the ocean bottom.

Scores of beachgoers locked arms in long chains to search the water as a Coast Guard cutter, two helicopters and five boats hovered nearby.

The Special Olympics World Games has brought over 7,000 athletes from around the world to compete in athletic events this week in the New Haven area. Madison is about 16 miles east of New Haven.

Mali was on a private outing with 11 other Nepalese athletes and four adults, including a volunteer host assigned to the team, said Sgt. Dale Hourigan, a state police spokesman.

The unidentified volunteer was in the water with three athletes including Mali when he took two of them out because there was a drop-off and he thought they were getting nervous, authorities said. When he went back to get Mali, the volunteer could not find him.

From: psharma@emh1.tic.bismarck.nd.us (Padam Sharma) Subject: CNN invades South Asia

 CNN clinches landmark India television deal By Moses Manoharan

     NEW DELHI, June 30 (Reuter) - India's state-run Doordarshan television, in a landmark step in opening up the country to foreign television, on Friday signed an agreement to allow the CNN network to broadcast to the subcontinent.
     Under the politically sensitive deal, U.S-based Turner International will pay US$1.5 million a year for the lease of a 24-hour channel on the Indian government-owned Insat 2B satellite to beam CNN International Inc (CNNI).
     Turner International and CNNI are subsidiaries of the Atlanta-based news and entertainment giant, Turner Broadcasting Systems Inc (TBS).
     "It is a turning point for television in India ... it is a landmark agreement," R. Basu, Doordarshan's director-general, told Reuters after signing the agreement in Delhi.
     Basu said the agreement would lead to Doordarshan offering channels to other television broadcasters by the end of this year, as soon as its next satellite, Insat 2C, was sent up.
     CNN will provide at least one hour of current affairs and entertainment daily on Doordarshan's terrestial channels. In return, Doordarshan will have one and a half hours of programming on CNN from Monday to Saturday and two hours on Sunday.
     Up till now, the Hong Kong-based Star TV and other foreign media have been using non-Indian satellites to beam into India with programmes only received on dish.
     TBS has also applied for government approval to set up a subsidiary and expects the go-ahead soon, the newly appointed president for Turner International in India, Bhaskar Pant, said.
     The wholly owned subsidiary would market, licence and distribute TBS trademarks, programmes and merchandise.
     Reporting and broadcasting of Indian news by foreign media, especially on insurgencies in areas such as Kashmir, is a sensitive issue for the Indian government.
     The print media has been prevented by cabinet decisions in 1955 and 1956 from directly distributing news, despite attempts by several foreign publications after Prime Minister Narasimha Rao launched economic reforms to lift decades of socialist controls.
     At present, international news agencies can only distribute through India's own domestic agencies.
     Supporters of the restrictions say the curbs stop foreigners from enjoying undue influence in India.
     But analysts say the four years of economic reforms have caused a huge jump in the number of people watching satelitte television -- 16 million Indian households have cable television.
     CNNI took months to clear its deal and it was clinched only after approval by opposition parties, some of which have reservations against diluting the foreign media restrictions.
     The government criticises foreign media saying it is insensitive in portraying poverty in developing countries like India.
     Doordarshan and CNN said they would not attempt any censoring of its broadcasts.
     But Basu said: "There is a perception in some of the Western countries that India is a land of snakes and snake charmers and cattle on the streets and poverty. I hope that the association with CNN will allow it to correct this impression."

Source: The India Digest Dispatched by Padam Sharma

To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu From: psharma@emh1.tic.bismarck.nd.us (Padam Sharma) Subject: Some more news on Ramesh Mali

7/7/95 9:45 AM Inches: 10.9 URGENT PM_OLY_MissingSwimmer_07_07 0461 PM-OLY--Missing Swimmer,0468 By CHRISTINE HANLEY

Associated Press Writer

MADISON, Conn. (AP) - Ramesh Mali, the Nepalese athlete feared drowned in Long Island Sound, had never been to the sea before, his family said.

He slipped from sight about noon Thursday as he swam with two countrymen in an unguarded section of Hammonasset Beach State Park.

The search for the Special Olympics athlete continued this morning.

"We will continue the search, but it has gone from a search and rescue to a recovery mission," said state police Sgt. Dale Hourigan.

"We hope Ramesh is safe. My mother has gone to the temple to pray for the safe return of Ramesh," Laxman Mali, his brother, said today from Katmandu, Nepal.

He was mentally retarded since birth. This was his first trip abroad.

"I am wondering why Ramesh was taken to the beach for swimming. He has never seen the sea before," his brother said.

The Coast Guard kept their boats on the water through the night Thursday, using spotlights to search the surface. Officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection and state police also remained at the scene.

Divers resumed searching for Mali shortly after daybreak, according to a dispatcher for the Madison fire department. As many as 35 assisted in the rescue effort Thursday, the last two being pulled out about 10:30 p.m.

Mali, a soccer player who came to Connecticut to compete in the Special Olympics World Games, was on a recreational outing at Hammonasset with a group of fellow athletes from Nepal when he disappeared.

He was last seen in chest-deep water at low tide shortly before 12:30 p.m. Thursday.

"A woman on the beach and some Special Olympic athletes were out there swimming and said they saw a person go down and didn't come up," said Todd Rainey, director of beach operations.

Scores of beachgoers locked arms in long chains Thursday to systematically search the water. Authorities also searched on land in case Mali, dressed in black shorts and a white T-shirt, had wandered ashore.

The Coast Guard dispatched a cutter and about a dozen other boats to the scene. Five helicopters also assisted in the search.

The president of the games organizing committee, Timothy Shriver, met with team members at their dormitory for several hours late Thursday and counselors were provided for the team, Henick said.

"I would describe the team's attitude as deeply saddened and coming together," he said.

After talking with the Nepal Counsel General's Office in the United States, the team decided to stay for the duration of the games, Henick said. The team had a game scheduled for 3 p.m. today, but Henick declined to say whether that game would continue as planned.

7/7/95 5:28 PM Inches: 14.1 URGENT AM_CT_SpecialOlympics_N_07-07 0596

AM-CT--Special Olympics-Nepal,650

Nepalese Team Plays On Despite Tragedy; A 'Testament to Courage'

By BRIGITTE GREENBERG

Associated Press Writer

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Nepal's Special Olympics soccer team took to the field Friday, determined to go on despite the loss of a teammate, who was feared drowned.

They played poorly but were cheered heartily, and when the day was over, they proudly wore bronze medals around their necks.

Former Gov. Lowell P. Weicker, chairman of the Special Olympic World Games, was on the sidelines to give his support. So were members of the Utah soccer team, who had lost to Nepal two days earlier.

"They've got a tough opponent but they're playing gamely, and the fact that they're playing at all is a testament to their courage," Weicker said.

The game started with a long moment of silence in honor of Ramesh Mali, a member of Nepal's team who disappeared off the Connecticut coast on Thursday while swimming with his friends. His teammates bowed their heads and shut their eyes tightly. Mali's name was still on their roster Friday.

Despite some agile passing by the team in purple and white and the cheers from a small but devoted group of fans, Nepal was unable to score. They lost 6-0 to Ivory Coast.

After a long meeting Thursday night with Timothy Shriver, the president of the 1995 Special Olympics World Games, the team decided to continue to compete. The Nepalese were escorted to the field Friday by police and about a dozen Olympic organizers, who guarded them heavily and declined requests from reporters for interviews with the team and coach.

The U.S. soccer team from Utah, which had lost to Nepal 3-1, came to give their former rivals moral support.

"I sat my boys down this morning and we talked about what happened," said Utah coach James Bradshaw. "We decided then and there we would come out and cheer for them."

Bradshaw said the Nepalese had touched the hearts of his athletes because Nepal even cheered when Utah scored its one goal.

"When I heard the news, it scared me to death," said Bradshaw, his voice quivering with emotion. "I thought about my athletes and what would happen if I lost one of them."

Describing the Nepalese team as quick and agile, Bradshaw said he believed that Nepal could have beaten the Ivory Coast if it were not for the sadness weighing upon them.

"The Ivory Coast is a fine team. I mean no offense. But they're no Nepal. My opinion is: For them, it's over. They have a lot more important things to deal with now," Bradshaw said.

Joseph Thomas, a special athlete from Utah, said he remembered Mali from Wednesday's game.

"I told him that they were a great team and he said, 'So are you guys,"' Thomas said.

Divita Mehta, 13, a New Haven resident who came to the United States two years ago from Nepal, said she had been rooting for the team and even got Mali's autograph because he was such a good player.

"He was a nice person. He was smiling all the time. I'm sure they miss him a lot," she said.

The athletes proudly accepted their bronze medals in a ceremony late Friday. Earlier in the week, they had won against the U.S. team from Maryland, 5-0; lost to Bangladesh, 3-4; and had tied the Ivory Coast, 1-1. The last game was the tie-breaker for the silver medal.

During the brief ceremony, five team members bowed their heads as the medals were placed around their necks. Then they held hands and raised their arms in triumph, each one smiling.

7/7/95 9:45 AM Inches: 10.9 URGENT PM_OLY_MissingSwimmer_07_07 0461

PM-OLY--Missing Swimmer,0468

By CHRISTINE HANLEY

Associated Press Writer

MADISON, Conn. (AP) - Ramesh Mali, the Nepalese athlete feared drowned in Long Island Sound, had never been to the sea before, his family said.

He slipped from sight about noon Thursday as he swam with two countrymen in an unguarded section of Hammonasset Beach State Park.

The search for the Special Olympics athlete continued this morning.

"We will continue the search, but it has gone from a search and rescue to a recovery mission," said state police Sgt. Dale Hourigan.

"We hope Ramesh is safe. My mother has gone to the temple to pray for the safe return of Ramesh," Laxman Mali, his brother, said today from Katmandu, Nepal.

He was mentally retarded since birth. This was his first trip abroad.

"I am wondering why Ramesh was taken to the beach for swimming. He has never seen the sea before," his brother said.

The Coast Guard kept their boats on the water through the night Thursday, using spotlights to search the surface. Officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection and state police also remained at the scene.

Divers resumed searching for Mali shortly after daybreak, according to a dispatcher for the Madison fire department. As many as 35 assisted in the rescue effort Thursday, the last two being pulled out about 10:30 p.m.

Mali, a soccer player who came to Connecticut to compete in the Special Olympics World Games, was on a recreational outing at Hammonasset with a group of fellow athletes from Nepal when he disappeared.

He was last seen in chest-deep water at low tide shortly before 12:30 p.m. Thursday.

"A woman on the beach and some Special Olympic athletes were out there swimming and said they saw a person go down and didn't come up," said Todd Rainey, director of beach operations.

Scores of beachgoers locked arms in long chains Thursday to systematically search the water. Authorities also searched on land in case Mali, dressed in black shorts and a white T-shirt, had wandered ashore.

The Coast Guard dispatched a cutter and about a dozen other boats to the scene. Five helicopters also assisted in the search.

The president of the games organizing committee, Timothy Shriver, met with team members at their dormitory for several hours late Thursday and counselors were provided for the team, Henick said.

"I would describe the team's attitude as deeply saddened and coming together," he said.

After talking with the Nepal Counsel General's Office in the United States, the team decided to stay for the duration of the games, Henick said. The team had a game scheduled for 3 p.m. today, but Henick declined to say whether that game would continue as planned.

7/7/95 5:28 PM Inches: 14.1 URGENT AM_CT_SpecialOlympics_N_07-07 0596

AM-CT--Special Olympics-Nepal,650

Nepalese Team Plays On Despite Tragedy; A 'Testament to Courage'

By BRIGITTE GREENBERG

Associated Press Writer

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) - Nepal's Special Olympics soccer team took to the field Friday, determined to go on despite the loss of a teammate, who was feared drowned.

They played poorly but were cheered heartily, and when the day was over, they proudly wore bronze medals around their necks.

Former Gov. Lowell P. Weicker, chairman of the Special Olympic World Games, was on the sidelines to give his support. So were members of the Utah soccer team, who had lost to Nepal two days earlier.

"They've got a tough opponent but they're playing gamely, and the fact that they're playing at all is a testament to their courage," Weicker said.

The game started with a long moment of silence in honor of Ramesh Mali, a member of Nepal's team who disappeared off the Connecticut coast on Thursday while swimming with his friends. His teammates bowed their heads and shut their eyes tightly. Mali's name was still on their roster Friday.

Despite some agile passing by the team in purple and white and the cheers from a small but devoted group of fans, Nepal was unable to score. They lost 6-0 to Ivory Coast.

After a long meeting Thursday night with Timothy Shriver, the president of the 1995 Special Olympics World Games, the team decided to continue to compete. The Nepalese were escorted to the field Friday by police and about a dozen Olympic organizers, who guarded them heavily and declined requests from reporters for interviews with the team and coach.

The U.S. soccer team from Utah, which had lost to Nepal 3-1, came to give their former rivals moral support.

"I sat my boys down this morning and we talked about what happened," said Utah coach James Bradshaw. "We decided then and there we would come out and cheer for them."

Bradshaw said the Nepalese had touched the hearts of his athletes because Nepal even cheered when Utah scored its one goal.

"When I heard the news, it scared me to death," said Bradshaw, his voice quivering with emotion. "I thought about my athletes and what would happen if I lost one of them."

Describing the Nepalese team as quick and agile, Bradshaw said he believed that Nepal could have beaten the Ivory Coast if it were not for the sadness weighing upon them.

"The Ivory Coast is a fine team. I mean no offense. But they're no Nepal. My opinion is: For them, it's over. They have a lot more important things to deal with now," Bradshaw said.

Joseph Thomas, a special athlete from Utah, said he remembered Mali from Wednesday's game.

"I told him that they were a great team and he said, 'So are you guys,"' Thomas said.

Divita Mehta, 13, a New Haven resident who came to the United States two years ago from Nepal, said she had been rooting for the team and even got Mali's autograph because he was such a good player.

"He was a nice person. He was smiling all the time. I'm sure they miss him a lot," she said.

The athletes proudly accepted their bronze medals in a ceremony late Friday. Earlier in the week, they had won against the U.S. team from Maryland, 5-0; lost to Bangladesh, 3-4; and had tied the Ivory Coast, 1-1. The last game was the tie-breaker for the silver medal.

During the brief ceremony, five team members bowed their heads as the medals were placed around their necks. Then they held hands and raised their arms in triumph, each one smiling.

******************************************************************** From: ponta@sas.upenn.edu (Pratyoush R. Onta) Subject: (fwd) photo exhibit (fwd) To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu (tnd) Date: Sun, 9 Jul 1995 08:34:39 -0400 (EDT)

Central bank arranges export promotion credits

SOURCE: Source: Radio Nepal, Kathmandu, in English 1415 gmt 5 Jul 95

 BODY:
   Text of report by Radio Nepal

     Nepal Rastra Bank has made a new arrangement for the commercial banks to categorize the bank loans of up to 5m rupees provided to the export-oriented industries for import of raw materials and [word indistinct] as priority sector credit for the next six-seven years with the objective of having a positive impact on the establishment and promotion of export-oriented industries and facilitate the flow of priority-sector credit.

The New York Times

                   July 7, 1995, Friday, Late Edition - Final

SECTION: Section C; Page 24; Column 3; Weekend Desk

LENGTH: 232 words

HEADLINE: Art in Review

BYLINE: By CHARLES HAGEN

 BODY:
  Kevin Bubriski National Arts Club 15 Gramercy Park South Tomorrow and Sunday

   The people in Kevin Bubriski's black-and-white portraits, made over the last decade in Nepal, Tibet and northern India, face the camera with quiet, almost meditative assurance. The most persuasive pictures were made with large-format cameras, and reflect the deliberate seeing that such cumbersome equipment favors.

    Most of the pictures are carefully posed, and have the directness of ethnographic images. But Mr. Bubriski's respectful attention elevates some of them above record shots. Picture after picture alludes to the rich spiritual life of the region. A monk with a prayer book in Lhasa, Tibet, is depicted in delicate side lighting; a young monk in Katmandu, Nepal, looks at the camera with a quiet gaze.

   Chinese attacks on Tibetan religion and culture are suggested by an image of desecrated statues at a monastery in Lhasa, and the persistence of belief is illustrated by a photo of a Tibetan workman looking reverently at a small picture of the Dalai Lama.

   What is missing, both in the photographs and in the sparse accompanying texts, is any cultural or historical background. Mr. Bubriski photographs his subjects with evident affection and admiration, but does little to help his audience understand who the people are, or why he finds them so compelling. CHARLES HAGEN

******************************************************************** Date: Sun, 9 Jul 95 18:11:38 EDT From: "Robby Khanal" <RKhanal@state.de.us> To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Subject: Amrit Kayastha's claim

Amrit Mohan Kayastha's claim (from Mercantile Co. in Nepal) that he is the only Internet service provider in Nepal is absolutely incorrect. I have been using Internet to send e-mail for past 2 months using this address in Nepal:

     glocom@globpc.mos.com.np.

Just thought I'd let everyone know.

                                             Robby Khanal

************************************************************** Date: Sun, 09 Jul 95 21:29:01 -0400 Sender: karki_s@a1.mscf.upenn.edu From: "Sher Karki" <karki_s@a1.mscf.upenn.edu> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Chootkila

Nun's Ass

A priest, who wanted to raise money for his church, was told there was a fortune in horse racing, and so he decided to buy a horse and enter it in some races. However, at the local auction, the going price for horses was so steep that he decided to buy a donkey instead.

Although he had some doubts, the priest figured that he might as well enter the animal in a race just to see how it would do. To his surprise the donkey came in second.The next day the headlines read:

PRIEST'S ASS SHOWS

The priest was so pleased that he entered the animal in another race, and this time it won.The headline read:

PRIEST'S ASS OUT IN FRONT

The bishop was so upset with this kind of publicity that he ordered the priest not to enter the donkey in another race.The new headline read:

BISHOP SCRATCHES PRIEST'S ASS

This was too much for the bishop, and he ordered the priest to get rid of the animal. The priest gave the donkey to a nun in a nearby convent.The next day the headline read:

NUN HAS BEST ASS IN TOWN

The bishop fainted. He told the nun that she would have to dispose of the donkey. After several days, the nun finally sold the beast to a local farmer for $10.The headline read:

NUN PEDDLES ASS FOR TEN BUCKS

They buried the bishop the next day.

Cheers, Sher

************************************************************* Date: Mon, 10 Jul 1995 09:52 EST To: nepal@cs.niu.edu From: Bibhuti Shrestha <bibhuti@uwyo.edu> Date: 3-JUL-1995 03:11:38 Description: Re: Denver Festivities

The Denver Festivity (ANA) is over. We had a banquet today at the Seraton Hotel and i am just coming back from the party. The party was fun, we had dance (both Nepali and English music was played). Almost everyone danced! It was a lot of fun. Though the ANA convention is officially over, we are having a picnic on the 4th of July. If you want more info on that, let me know. They also announced the new official (I forget the whole list) and also announced that the next ANA convention will be held in NewYork next 4th of July Weekend (1996). If you are in Denver or planning to be here and want to join the picnic, email me and I will give you more info on that. At the dinner table, I had the oppurtunity to sit down with the
"american-Nepali" guys and hear some of their views about the Nepali culture and their definition of culture and respect and some views on how they felt about teenage dating. It was pretty interesting. Most of it went over my head. but I have asked few of the guys on the table to post their views about those issues in SCN, lets hopw they do that and we can share and discuss about that. Other than that, there was a FOUR(!!) hrs long cultural program yesterday night. Some of them were good stuuf (like the Sur Sudha Natya toli they brought directly form Nepal, and some pro singing who are Living here in boulder). Other wise the rest of the show was *shrug* I thought a little boring. But I can't complain. At least they tried their best and that alone deserves a clap. Of course the teenager (neplai-american) issue immerged there too in the form of a skate the teenagers performed illustrating how their parents react to dating and how their parents try to force them to eat "bhat" etc. It was quite funny! I had more fun in the dance today though (lasted from 8 till 12 and we were still asking for more, but they had no more time). I will post a list of the new ANA officers etc in the newsgroup later. Bibhuti "proud to be a Nepali" Shrestha.
  John Combs <jcombs@pobox.com> wrote:
>Does anyone know any particulars about the festivities in Denver this
>weekend, the first weekend in July? The ANA sponsors it I hear.
>
 
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