The Nepal Digest - January 30, 1996 (16 Magh 2052 BkSm)

From: The Editor (nepal-request@cs.niu.edu)
Date: Tue Jan 30 1996 - 12:55:38 CST


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The Nepal Digest Tuesday 30 Jan 96: Magh 16 2052 BS: Year5 Volume46 Issue7

  Today's Topics:

        1. Message from the editor

        2. KURA_KANI

                 Political - Bhutanese Refuges
                 Technology - Power Sector

 ******************************************************************************
 * TND Board of Staff *
 * ------------------ *
 * *
 * TND Foundations Home Page: http://www.nepal.org *
 * -------------------- *
 * webmaster email: tnd@nepal.org *
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 * TND Foundations contributions can be mailed payable to: *
 * TND Foundations *
 * c/o R. J. Singh *
 * 44 Greenridge Ave *
 * White Plains, NY 10605, USA *
 * *
 * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu *
 * TND Archives: Sohan Panta k945184@atlas.kingston.ac.uk *
 * SCN Correspondent: Rajesh B. Shrestha rshresth@black.clarku.edu *
 * Webmaster Correspondent: Pradeep Bista tnd@nepal.org *
 * *
 * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
 * *
 * "LIFE: Indulgence vs Seeking Truth - Which is your forte?" -Sirdar_Khalifa *
 * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" -Dr. MLK *
 * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" -Sirdar_Khalifa *
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From: TND Foundations <tnd@nepal.org> To: The Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu> Subject: TND Foundation Contribution Fund

Dear TND members:

     TND Foundations is accepting your generous contribution in an effort to
     find a permanant home for The Nepal Digest (TND).

     You are encouraged to send your contribution payabale to:
    
            TND Foundations
            c/o Rajpal J. Singh
            44 Greenridge Ave
            White Plains, NY 10605

     Following members have been kind with their generous contributions:

       
     Mahesh K. Maskey Arlington, MA
     Rajpal J. Singh White Plains, NY
     Padam P. Sharma Bismarck,ND
     Lynn B. Reid Jamaica Plain, MA
     John Mage New York, NY
     Raju Tuladhar Alberta, Canada
     Bhanu B. Niraula Flushing, NY
     Amulya R. Tuladhar Worcester, MA
     Rajesh B. Shrestha Worcester, MA
     Abi Sharma British Columbia, Canada
     Mary Deschene Baltimore, MD
     Pratyoush Onta Kathmandu, Nepal
     Anita Regmi Wheaton, MD
     Bal Krishna Sharma East Lansing, MI
     Subas Sakya Pumona, NY
     Marian E. Greenspan Beltsville, MD
     Sanjay B. Shah Blacksburg, VA
        
     TND offeres heartful thanks to all the generous contributors.

Sincerely Rajpal J. Singh TND Foundation tnd@nepal.org http://www.nepal.org

********************************************************************** Date: Fri, 19 Jan 1996 12:45:18 EST From: R.L.Shrestha@cranfield.ac.uk To: Nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: message

      First of all I would like to thank to you for sending me "The Digest Nepal" to me but after november I am not getting any bulletin from you.so I am missing the news what's going on my country.Could you please check or prescribe me "The Digest Nepal" on regular basis again.I will be much obliged to you.

My email address is R.L.Shrestha@silsoe.cranfield.ac.uk

I look forward to recieving the bulletin from you.

Thank You Ramesh Lal Shrestha

%%%%%Editor's Note: We have tried to deliver mail to your username and %%%%%
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%%%%% to us again. Thank you. %%%%%
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************************************************************** Date: Fri, 19 Jan 1996 19:00:18 +0545 (NPT) From: Visitor_at_Infotech <visitor@mos.com.np> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Appreciating Prahlad Bahadur KC of Boston

        This is a short note from Kathmandu to CONGRATULATE Prahlad Bahadur KC's recent winning the prestigious Massachusetts Governor's Award. From what I understand, the award is given to those immigrants whose contributions enrich their adopted communities in Massachusetts.

        I am sure there are people, in Boston and elsewhere, who know Prahlad better than I. But let me just share this with the TND Family.

        Prahlad was instrumental in getting Dilli Bahadur Chaudhary and Defu Lal Chaudhary, two young Tharu activists from Dang, to the US last year for Dilli to accept the Reebok International Human Rights Award. Folks at the Reebok's Foundation later told me that they would have found it doubly difficult to arrange Dilli's and Defu's trip to the US had it not been for Prahlad's working hard (from the US) to help them get their passport(s), travel plans, US visas, and so on in record short time.

        In addition, Reebok people had been thankful to Prahlad for all other help he provided, as a member of the Greater Boston Nepali Community, in Boston to make Dilli and Defu feel at home, and so on.

        In talking with Dilli and Defu in Dang, I have found out that they too are quite thankful to Prahlad for all his help. In fact, they often talk about the hospitality extended to them by Prahlad and his family and other Boston Nepalis on their short visit to the US in December 1994.

        Congratulations, Prahlad Dai.

namaste ashu kathmandu, nepal

p.s. Congratulations to the folks at the GBNC for now coming up with a long-overdue GBNC Home Page.
         
********************************************************************** Date: Sun, 21 Jan 1996 17:13:06 -0500 (EST) From: "Jai Mehta (FO 1998)" <jai.mehta@yale.edu> To: The Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Re: Job opportunities in Nepal

Dear TND netters,

I would like to bring the following vacancy announcement from Nepal to your notice:

                        VACANCY ANNOUNCEMENT
                Visiting Scholar Program, Nepal

The "Training and Manpower Development in Community Forestry Management Project" funded by the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) at the Institute of Forestry (IOF) of Tribhuvan University, Nepal is seeking three Visiting Scholars of international reputation for the following subject areas to work in research, teaching and curriculum development.

Subject Area: 1.Social/Community Forestry
                2.Watershed Management/Environment Science
                3.Sustainable Forest Resource Management (with
                  exepertise in Utilization of Timber/Non-Timber
                  Forest priducts) Honorarium : At a rate of US $ 50,000.00 per annium. Duration : Up to one year Facilities : Travel expenses to and from Nepal, General Health
                and Medical Insurance coverage, Accommodation
                allowances, Teaching aids, Job related transportation
                facilities To Apply : Interested candidates should send an application along
                with a current resume, a statement of research interests,
                a sample of publications, subject areas prepared to
                teach, and letter of references from three professional
                referees Send to : Project Manager, IOF/ITTO Project, Institute of Forestry,
                P.O. Box 203, Pokhara, Nepal
                Telephone/Facsimile: 977-61-21563 Application Deadline: February 1996 Attention : 1. Incomplete applications as well as those received after
                   the deadline will not be entertained.
                2. The applicant must specify the position he/she would
                   to apply.
                3. Selected Visiting Scholar will be expected to join
                   IOF as early as May/June 1996, but later appointment
                   is also considerable.
                4. Nepal or similar country experience in specified field
                   is desirable.
                5. The project does not discriminate on the basis of
                   race, religion, gender, and ethnicity.
                6. IOF/ITTO Project reserves the right to reject all the
                   applicants if found unsuitable.

********************************************************************** Date: Mon, 22 Jan 1996 22:04:46 -0500 To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> From: sharma@plains.nodak.edu (Padam Sharma) Subject: Story on Bhutani marchers

Courtesy: India Digest (1/22/96)

   CALCUTTA, India (AP) -- Indian police in the remote Himalayan frontier with Nepal have arrested 166 Bhutanese exiles and thwarted their planned march to Bhutanese capital Thimphu, police said today.
   The marchers, representing 100,000 ethnic Nepalese who were driven out of Bhutan in the early 1990s, wanted to ask the Bhutanese king to let them return home.
   "We had imposed prohibitory orders on the border entry point and they were arrested for violating that order," said S.I.S. Ahmed of the West Bengal state police.
   The arrests were made on Wednesday near the Raniganj border post, 310 miles northeast of Calcutta. Reports were delayed because of poor communication.
   Ahmed said 13 of the exiles were freed after they sought bail, but others were kept in police custody because they refused to furnish bail bonds.
   Chanting religious hymns, the exiles, who want democracy to replace monarchy in Bhutan, began the trek on Jan. 14 across the Himalayan mountains.
   They had planned the 23-day hike from eastern Nepal, through a sliver of India and into Bhutan, a tiny mountainous land.
   Bhutan had asked India to stop the protesters at the border. India, which regards its ally Bhutan as a buffer state between it and China, complied.

Courtesy: India Digest (1/22/96)

    By Paul Eckert
     BEIJING, Jan 19 (Reuter) - A western human rights group expressed concern on Friday that a six-year-old boy named by the exiled Dalai Lama as Tibetan Buddhism's second-ranking monk remains "missing" along with his family and other monks.
     "Amnesty International is seriously concerned that a six-year-old Tibetan boy and his family have been missing from their home for eight months and may be under restriction by the authorities," the group said from its London headquarters.
     Amnesty said a Tibetan abbot and more than 50 other monks and laypersons from the Himalayan region remained in detention in connection with a bitter dispute with China over the reincarnation of the Panchen Lama.
     Chinese officials have steadfastly maintained that the boy is safe in Tibet but have declined to give further details.
     Amnesty called on Beijing to disclose full details and lift any restrictions so the boy and his parents "are free to return to their village and live without restriction or harassment."
     The Dalai Lama, Tibetan Buddhism's exiled god-king, last May identified Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, six, as the 11th Panchen Lama.
     Beijing denounced the selection as invalid, saying the Dalai Lama's unilateral action violated a 200-year-old agreement under which China's government must approve all senior lamas.
     Beijing enthroned its own "soul boy" choice, Gyaincain Norbu, also six, in November as the official reincarnation of the 10th Panchen Lama, who died in 1989.
     State religious authorities reached by telephone in Tibet on Friday said they did not know the whereabouts of the boy named by the Dalai Lama or his family.
     "We do not know if he is inside the country or abroad," a Religious Affairs Bureau official in Tibet's capital, Lhasa, told Reuters. "We have not been involved in his case."
     The enthronement of a Communist Party-approved Panchen Lama caused a furore over the religious land Beijing has ruled, often with an iron fist, since China's 1949 communist takeover.
     Amnesty International and Tibetan activists in exile have said Gedhun Choekyi Nyima and his family were taken to Beijing during the reincarnation row and not seen since. Amnesty said information received this month indicated no change.
     Chinese authorities have declined to give details about the boy who the official Xinhua news agency has branded a dog-killer unfit for religious service.
     "The boy is in sound health," Foreign Ministry spokesman Chen Jian said on Tuesday. "I stand by what I said."
     Communist Party chief Jiang Zemin last week met China's official Panchen Lama in Beijing and urged the boy to defend patriotism -- something the boy agreed to do, according to official Chinese accounts.
     China has portrayed the spiritual succession as part of an epic 30-year struggle with the Dalai Lama, condemned by Beijing as a pro-independent "splittist."
     The Dalai Lama and thousands of followers fled to India in 1959 after an abortive anti-Chinese uprising, but he continues to command the loyalty of many Buddhists in Tibet.
     The region has been rocked by often violent pro-independence protests since 1987. China has jailed many monks and nuns who have spearheaded the movement to separate Tibet from China.

********************************************************************** Date: Thu, 25 Jan 1996 18:26:35 To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: himal@himpc.mos.com.np Subject: HIMAL

HIMAL MAGAZINE LISTING The November-December 1996 issue is out.

Kaboom Kabul by Zahid Khan Afghanistan's neighbour's play a Not-so-Great Game for control of a country that is too geo-strategically important for its own good.

The Power of Compassion or the Power of Rhetoric by Kim Gutschow A report on the Fourth International Conference on Buddhist women.

A South Asian in American Academia by Binod Bhattarai An annual conference which has its downside, but the ups seem to more than make up for it.

Lumbini as Disneyland by Rachana Pathak At the sacred site of Siddhartha Gautam's birth, archaeologists run amok, architects are needlessly ostentatious and sects outspend each other. The world gains a tourist site, but loses a spiritual centre.

The Porter's Burden by Kanak Mani Dixit Bearing loads on the back the way his ancestors did fifteen thousand years ago, the Nepali porter carries an evolutionary legacy as well as a modern-day burden.

Say When, Burma by Satya Sivaraman Burmese democrats seem confident about democracy, but the Rangoon junta is busy establishing military and economic alliances.

... plus more feature articles, briefs, reviews, abstracts, Himalaya Mediafile, Know Your Himal, and the last Abominably Yours.

Important Notice: In March, Himal is re-launching as a monthly South Asian magazine. The issue just out has in it a slip containing a special one-time offer providing subscribers more than 50 percent discount for a year's subscription. Fill up the form, send in your payment, and get a head start on all other South Asians!

********************************************************************** Date: Wed, 24 Jan 1996 18:05:21 +0000 (GMT) From: strawn <chris.strawn@queen-elizabeth-house.oxford.ac.uk> Subject: Bhutanese demonstrations-update 23 January 1996 (fwd)

Forwarded information on the Bhutanese refugees...

        FROM Jesuit Refugee Service Asia/Pacific
        DATE 23 January 1996
        REGARDING Bhutanese demonstrations-update 23 January 1996

Please distribute this report.

153 Bhutanese peace marchers and Indian human rights activists remain in detention in the Indian state of West Bengal, after attempting to march from Nepal to Bhutan, through India. The legality of their detention is still under question.

An additional group of 300 marchers have set out, and should reach the Nepal/Indian border today, 23 January. Reports state than Indian security forces have gathered to meet them. Observers are again requesting that human rights monitors be present during the march.

Concerns have arisen that various support groups within India may be using the refugees merely as political ammunition to advance their own agendas. Organizers are worried the purpose of the refugee march to bring about a resolution to the lingering problem of Bhutanese refugees, may be lost in other regional issues. These include existing tensions in the area between West Bengal and India, and the fear of a potential movement of ethnic Nepalese to create a greater Nepali nation.

150 refugee marchers were detained on January 17 in Siliguri, along with 16 Indian human rights supporters from the group Sobre (Support Organization of Bhutanese Refugees). All but 3 of the Sobre group have been released. Treatment of the refugees has been good, although 3 hae fallen ill, including one who is currently in the hospital.

The peace marchers ostensibly are being held for violating IPC (Indian Penal Code) 144, which was implemented in anticipation of the marches, and prohibits public demonstrations. In an interesting twist, some reports indicate the public prosecutor is challenging the legality of holding the marchers.

The marchers have all been given the option of release, if they sign a
"Personal Recommendation Bond" that promises they will no longer violate the peace in India. Thus far they have refused to sign the document.

The refugees set out on 14 January from camps in Nepal, with the goal of marching through India and into their home of Bhutan, where they would appeal to the Bhutanese king to resolve their situation.

If the peace marchers had planned to reach their destination of Thimphu, in Bhutan, on Monday, Feb 5. Observers are concerned that this group is willing to have their own blood shed if that is required to raise awareness, and the group has vowed not to return to the Nepalese camps.

Supporters inside India have also staged demonstrations in support of the marchers.

The mood among Bhutanese refugees in camps in Nepal is said to be hopeful. They hope the demonstrations will continue to raie awareness to their plight, which is in its six year with little sign of a pending resolution.

The refugees, totalling about 1/6 of the 600,000 people populating Bhutan, were forced to leave the country in the early 1990's after a "One Nation/ One People" policy effectively rendered them stateless. The international community has been thus far ineffective in resolving their plight. Bhutan has the largest percentage of its people living as refugees in the world.

300 Bhutanese refugees have reached the Nepal/India border during a peace march designed to raise international awareness and resolve their situation. 150 additional marchers and three activists remain in detention in India's West Bengal state, after attempting a similar march last week. The demonstrations have begun to receive comment from politicians in the region.

The 300 marchers reached the Nepal border town of Kakarvitta shortly before mid-day yesterday, 23 January. They were met at the bridge by a barricade and Indian security forces, who have prevented them from crossing. Human rights advocates and supporters of the march are negotiating to let the marchers proceed.

Meanwhile, the marchers being detained in the West Bengal town of Siliguri are awaiting a resolution, and are scheduled to be brought before a court on Monday, 29 January. The legality of their detention is being challenged.

The marches have begun to attract political comments, the following are from the English language Katmandu Post, 23 January 1996:

Nepali Foreign Prakash Chandra Lohani
"Why were the refugees arrested now, while trying to return to their country? Why weren't they arrested earlier on Indian territory while fleeing Bhutan?"

"The arrests are an internal affair of India, and we would not like to comment on it."

"If the talks with Bhutan at the foreign minister level also fail to make progress, Nepal could very well go for internationalizing the issue."

The Nepali opposition party, CPN [UML] (Communist Party of Nepal [United Marxist-Leninist]):
"India has interferred in the internal affairs of Bhutan by stopping Bhutanese refugees from reaching their homeland."

Radha Krishna Mainali, former minister in the CPN [UML]:
"It is not only a violation of human rights of the marchers, to stage a peaceful demonstration, but the arrests also signals India's desire to see more Bhutanese of ethnic Nepalese origin to be forced out from Bhutan."

"If the situation remains as such, Nepal will have to internationalize the refugee crisis. The Indian action itself has internationalized the issue. We are the third country for Bhutanese refugees. India, as the second country, should seriously consider resolving the problem."

The Amnesty International Executive Committe chairman, Ross Daniels, is currently in Nepal, and is reported to have made several public statements regarding the Bhutanese refugees.

In a related update, Ms. KAUSHILA RIZAL on January 12 faxed the ICRC and AI about her concern of the treatment of her husband in jail in Bhutan, Mr. TEK NAPH RIZAL. Mr. TEK NAPH RIZAL was abducted in Nepal 16 November 1989, and charged under a law that was not in existance when he was abducted. He has been adopted as an amnesty international prisoner of conscience. He is currently held in CHENGANG prison. A former inmate claims there is a premeditated plan to harass intimidate him. Eight inmates, called youngsters, were recruited to visit his cell while intoxicated and verbally abuse him with a "willful intention of harassing him." The purpose of the fax was to "issue an urgent appeal to the King of Bhutan so that this practice of abuse and harassment is stopped forthwith." The AI appeal is attatched to this document.

Concerns have arisen that various support groups within India may be using the refugees merely as political ammunition to advance their own agendas. Organizers are worried the purpose of the refugee march to bring about a resolution to the lingering problem of Bhutanese refugees, may be lost in other regional issues. These include existing tensions in the area between West Bengal and India, and the fear of a potential movement of ethnic Nepalese to create a greater Nepali nation.

The peace marchers ostensibly are being held for violating IPC (Indian Penal Code) 144, which was implemented in anticipation of the marches, and prohibits public demonstrations. In an interesting twist, some reports indicate the public prosecutor is challenging the legality of holding the marchers. Treatment of the refugees has been good, although 3 have fallen ill, including one who is currently in the hospital.

The marchers have all been given the option of release, if they sign a
"Personal Recommendation Bond" that promises they will no longer violate the peace in India. Thus far they have refused to sign the document.

The first group of peace marchers had planned to reach their destination of Thimphu, in Bhutan, on Monday, Feb 5. Observers are concerned that this group is willing to have their own blood shed if that is required to raise awareness, and the group has vowed not to return to the Nepalese camps.

Supporters inside India have also staged demonstrations in support of the marchers.

The mood among Bhutanese refugees in camps in Nepal is said to be hopeful. They hope the demonstrations will continue to raise awareness to their plight, which is in its six year with little sign of a pending resolution.

The refugees, totalling about 1/6 of the 600,000 people populating Bhutan, were forced to leave the country in the early 1990's after a "One Nation/ One People" policy effectively rendered them stateless. The international community has been thus far ineffective in resolving their plight. Bhutan has the largest percentage of its people living as refugees in the world.

********************************************************************** From: Rajesh Shrestha <rshresth@husc.harvard.edu> Date: Thu, 25 Jan 1996 10:55:11 -0500 (EST) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Please let me know about Living Goddess in Nepal

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Kosuke Irie (kochan@st.rim.or.jp) wrote:
: The other day I had an opportunity to watch a documentary about Nepalese
: religous life. Especially I was much interested in the living Goddess
: "Kumali". According to the VTR film, they say that the Kumali must
: abdicate the religious position if she bleeds such as at the biginning of
: the menstrual function or at the time a milk tooth begin to come out.
: They explained this rule by the anthropological term, "impurity".
: Then I had an even naive question : Won't a Kmali bleed from nose until
: she bleeds from menses or a milk tooth's coming out ? Theoretically,
: bleeding from nose means impurity same as menses or tooth's coming out, I
: think. But they never said about bleeding from nose as a reason of
: abdication. It is difficult for me to think a Kumali never bleeds from
: nose.
: In short, what I'd like to know is...
: :Whether a Kumali must abdicate the position when she bleeds from nose,
: or not.

: I'll be happy if anyone let me know the matter in detail.

: --
: Kosuke Irie
: Kurume University
: Japan

There were few articles posted on the net sometime back re: Kumari.

First I want to point out that, the correct english spelling is "Kumari", not kumali.

The literal english translation of "Kumari" is virgin. She is also known as Virgin Goddess in English.

So far as I know, "Kumari" should not bleed even through simple cuts, so my understanding is that she should not bleed through nose as well.

But why do you think that she will bleed from nose, before she bleeds from tooth removal or something else. Everybody necessarily does not bleed from nose.

"Kumari" is regarded as the manifestation of mother goddess "Taleju Bhawani" So she holds the same respect. Once the "Kumari" bleeds, it is an indication of being mortal, vulnerable, imperfect and impure. As such, she can not represent as the manifest of a goddess, therefore she is removed from that position.

Raju Tuladhar (tuladhar@enci.ucalgary.ca)

************************************************* From: bikash@MIT.EDU To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Re:"Nation's power sector has bright future:govt,"Jan.11,'96(TKP) Date: Thu, 25 Jan 1996 11:27:29 EST

Assuming that this report is grammatically correct and quotations valid, I have some comments to share with about the deceptive statements made by our hon'ble minister, Pasupati SJB Rana.

First, Rana claims that the present government had finally got rid of the load-shedding. This, according to Rana, was made possible with the additional power from Trishuli-Devighat (11MW), Myagdi (2MW), Phewa (1MW), and the rest from diesel-powered plants (8MW). The current power deficit during peak load (dry season) is, however, 44 MWs. Simple math would, therefore, urge the question: Where did the remaining 22 MW come from?

Second, Minister Rana states that an additional 23.5 MW of power will be incorporated in Nepal's power system through imports from India (20MW) and Morang-Chatar Canal(3.5 MW). If imports from India--keeping in mind that Bihar and Uttar Pradesh are themselves power-deficit areas during the dry season--and purchases of power from 1-3 MW diesel-generating sets of Nepali factories (which bought these sets because of the unreliability caused by Nepal Electricity Authority's continuous load-shedding, and now sell power back to NEA during non-operational hours) imply a bright future for NEpal's power sector, then Rana's "future" probably does not transcend beyond the next general elections or, even worse, beyond the next dissolution of the CONG-RPP coalition.

Furthermore, talking about geneartion in megawatts is grossly misleading: Even if plants are generating their full megawatts, there still can be a need for load-shedding if the peak load hours exceed the period for which the generators can be kept at full capacity due to water-level constarints at the reservoir or pond(in case of hydro plants) or oil-level/thermal constraints
(in case of diesel-powered plants). What, therefore, really matters is whether Rana's "no more loadshedding" promise holds throughout the year (especially during the dry season--now) to meet any contingency. Rana, I hope, is well aware that Nepal's annual electricity demand growth is 10-15%. Can he still promise Nepali citizens that there will be no loadshedding in the winter of 1997?

Third, Rana claims that 40.2 MW of capacity will be added by next year through the construction of Puwa Khola, Modi Khola,and Chilime. Till August 1995, the grounds at all these sites had not even been dug for civil works. Besides, it takes at least 3-5 years for a hydel power plant of the their capacities to be commissioned. A lethal promise,I think.

Fourth, the long-awaited Khimti-power project--the largest private-sector initiative originally destined to be commissioned in 1997/98--is now back on the track. This is certainly good news to all disciples of economic liberalizaton. But such delays do not bode well for future private investors in Nepal's hydropower development. As long as rates of return, generation costs, and the political/administrative climate are not compelling enough, private investors looking for quick returns will simply turn their backs away from Nepal.

Finally, all other projects(except for Kaligandaki "A"--which I think the government is desperately trying to gather funding for after Arun 3's confirmedburial) are still up in the air. Most of the hopeful ones are at the memorandum of understanding (MOU) levels. In concrete terms, this means that firm commitments (financing, technical support, etc) are still a far cry away.

I would live to get some feedback on this. My own academic interest lies in knowing more about Nepal's energy policy(if any, that is) and about the role of the private sector in Nepal's power sector development.

Bikash Thapliya

***********************************************************************************************

*********************************************************************************************** Forwarded By: Rajesh Shrestha <rshresth@husc.harvard.edu> Date: Fri, 26 Jan 1996 10:50:39 -0500 (EST) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: KTM-Post "Is the honey moon over?"

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

In article <4e5tgo$act@umbra.unr.edu>, dbastola@scs.unr.edu (Kiran) wrote:

> Hello friends,
>
> Like me, I am sure most of you out there have enjoyed the "Taja-khabar"
> online in the KTM-post. However, for several weeks since the web site
> moved I am having difficulty accessing the KTM-post. Most of the time my
> computer tells me it is contacting host, waiting for reply and then
> stalls for quite some time challenging my patience. After several minutes
> when I finally get to see the display of colors and boxes, if I am lucky,
> I click on to headline news and wait quite some time to get half or less
> of the document.
>
> I am wondering if it is my machine which the university is working on to
> replace with a better one or the host "nepal-info.com" or if honey moon
> for ktm-post was over like most of the projects and programs in Nepal,
> which once the management is handed over to the Nepali authority by the
> doner agencies every thing starts going downhill. I hope it is not the
> case here too.

Well Kiranji, you are not alone. But we should give them some credit, at least it is coming rather slowly than we would like in this fast paced information super highway. We have a sexually discriminating proverb that fits the dilemma, "Dhilai hosh tara chhorai hos".

I think the problem started when we lost the excellent volunteer spirit of our friend Rajendra, and you are right, it possibly got under bureucratic process and frustration of "maile matrai kati garne? khai na pai chhala ko topi lai". But it may be an internet routing problem. I think it tries to find some site in UK before connecting to nepal-info site. Has anybody any better explanation?

Padam Sharma 812 West Divide Ave Bismarck, ND 5801 701-258-2066 Email: sharma@plains.nodak.edu OR psharma@tic.bisman.com

Rajesh Shrestha writes:
----------------------

KTM Post site is infact located, geographically that is, in the UK. The www.nepal-info.com site is hosted by the Demon Systems, an Internet Service Provider based in UK. Because of the very fact that it is located across the Atlantic as opposed to Rajendra's US based site at UIUC, could mean a slower connection to US based users. Additionally, the Demon Systems which started out as a small company and has since expanded manyfold in size could be under increasing demands of its bandwidth resulting in slower accesses.

The following route trace of the www.nepal-info.com site from my site here at BBN Cambridge shows the exact route taken to the destination and the times taken to hear a response from each hop along the way. (Each hop is sent three packets and hence there are three response times. "*" indicates no response within a certain period):

traceroute to www.nepal-info.com (194.159.248.202), 30 hops max,40 byte packets
 1 t200-bldg-6 (128.89.0.1) 5 ms 3 ms 4 ms
 2 bbn-1.bbnplanet.net (192.52.71.11) 53 ms 134 ms 19 ms
 3 mit1-3.bbnplanet.net (192.233.149.202) 7 ms 8 ms 8 ms
 4 cpe1-fddi-0.boston.mci.net (192.233.33.11) 9 ms 7 ms 8 ms
 5 border1-hssi1-0.Boston.mci.net (204.70.20.5) 10 ms 11 ms 11 ms
 6 core-fddi-0.Boston.mci.net (204.70.2.33) 8 ms 10 ms 9 ms
 7 core-hssi-2.NewYork.mci.net (204.70.1.1) 16 ms 14 ms 14 ms
 8 core-hssi-2.Washington.mci.net (204.70.1.5) 18 ms 21 ms 18 ms
 9 borderx1-fddi0-0.Washington.mci.net (204.70.2.4) 20 ms 18 ms 23 ms 10 mae-east-plusplus.Washington.mci.net (204.70.74.102) 21 ms 20 ms 24 ms 11 192.41.177.145 (192.41.177.145) 50 ms * 76 ms 12 demon.washington.agis.net (205.137.59.58) 406 ms 406 ms * 13 trude-router.router.demon.net (194.159.252.99) 351 ms ermin-router.router.demon.net (194.159.252.98) 362 ms 342 ms 14 194.159.248.202 (194.159.248.202) 368 ms 346 ms *

Note that the response time from the very first hop across the Atlantic is rather huge (406 ms) as opposed to about 20ms until Washington DC.

I wonder if the browsers based in UK are also experiencing similiar slow access times. In that case, it would lend to the network demand at Demon Systems.

Rajesh B. Shrestha rajs@bbn.com

***************************************** To: nepal@cs.niu.edu From: h9250247@asterix.wu-wien.ac.at Subject:

The Rising Nepal, Kathmandu, Nepal January 12, 1996 ( Push 28, 2052)
------------------------------------

Manandhar gets Harshberger award By staff reporter

   Dr. Narayan P. Manandhar, an ethnobotanist at the National Herbarium and Plant Laboratories, Godawari, Lalitpur has been awarded the International Harshberger Award for 1995 by the Society of Ethnobotanists of India for his outstanding contribution in the field of Ethnobotany. Dr. Manandhar has been working in ethnobotany for the past two decades, and has published three books and more than 75 articles in national and international journals and magazines.
   Dr. J. W. Harshberger, a scientist who coined the term Ethnobotany, applied this term to the study of plants used by aboriginal people.
   The Harshberger medal award has been established by a Japanese donor to honour international scientists for their contributions to the field of ethnobotany.

 ----------------------------------------------- Subject: Making Ministries Out of Thin Air! To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Date: Fri, 26 Jan 1996 18:45:22 -0500 (EST) From: "Rajesh B. Shrestha" <rshresth@BBN.COM>

A recent news item from Nepal reported the expansion of the Deuba cabinet to an unprecedented size. The expansion included creation of a couple of new ministries including the Ministry of Population and Environment (MOPE). Another news item from Nepal subsequently reported that Prakash Singh, the minister of the newly created MOPE, organized a workshop in Kathmandu to discuss with the public what they wanted out of the MOPE and to chart out the responsibilities of MOPE.

While one can hardly supress one's instinct to remark at the blatant irony of the "fiscal discipline" espoused by the Finance Minister (who criticized the previous UML government for the lack of the same) during the early days of the new coalition cabinet, a broader question regarding the cabinet expansion is intriguing.

Not that the notions of population and environment were previoulsy non-existent, the fact that such a visionary idea as a Ministry of Population and Environment was created so smoothly with no beauracratic fuss and red tapes is remarkable. Sadly enough, the newly created MOPE had a complete body and life of its own but without the head! The MOPE had no purpose, no vision, no plans when created - a workshop had to be organized to discuss those. Now I wonder why a workshop was not organized *before* the creation of the MOPE rather than *after*. An institution of permanence such as a ministry is created without a notice out of thin air and a workshop called to figure out what to do with it - it's like building a bridge on sand and then pondering over to create a river to flow under it!

One begins to wonder how could such a thing happen or how would the rule of the land - the Constitution - allow such a thing to happen. When a government level commission, eg. a temporary investigative panel, is formed, it has to be passed by the Parliament before it takes shape. How come such a behemoth as a ministry be created at the whim of the PM? Judging from the experiences of the PMs we have had so far, tomorrow we could very well have a Ministry for Counting Trees or a Ministry for Doing Dishes just because the PM has the authority and needs to include all MPs in cabinet.

It is high time that our elected members feel more obliged to the people that elected them rather than their party henchmen. It is high time that the people in responsible positions realize that the times have changed - they better adapt and tune in to the times.

Rajesh B. Shrestha Cambridge, Massachusetts http://scimitar.bbn.com:8000/rajs

************************************************** Date: Sat, 27 Jan 1996 09:52:30 -0500 (EST) From: atuladhar@vax.clarku.edu Subject: Forwarded mail.... To: THE NEPAL DIGEST <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu>

Amulya's note:

I think Dr. N. P. Manandhar is the father of two active Nepali netters: Uday, formerlly of Clark; Sanjay, formerly of MIT and president of GBNC. He also has a sone Binay in Boston.

Congratulations

***************************************************** Date: Sat, 27 Jan 1996 14:28:52 +0000 (GMT) From: strawn <chris.strawn@queen-elizabeth-house.oxford.ac.uk> 150 Bhutanese refugees detained in the Indian state of West Bengal have been moved from Siliguri Special Jail to Jalpaiguri jail, 45 km away. No reason for the January 24 move was given, and the refugees are still scheduled to be brought before Siliguri court on 29 January.

3 Indian supporters of the peace marchers have been relased, after signing
"Personal Release" forms whereby they promise not to violate the peace any more.

The Appeal Movement Coordinating Committee (AMCC), that launched the march, is asking for legal support for the 150 detained marchers.

They AMCC insists the march is an exercise in support of the right of people to return to their own country, and of the right to peaceful freedom of assembly and association, as enshrined in articles XIII part II and XX part I of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The AMCC is asking for supporters to contact the Prime Minister of India and the Chief Minister of West Bengal for the speedy release of those in jail and for the lifting of IPC 144 so the march can continue.

Indian PM Narashima Rau fax #+91 11 301 6857

Chief Minister of West Bengal
+91 33 225 8262

Meanwhile 300 additional marchers still sit at the Nepal/Indian border, after having been refused entrance by Indian security forces. On the Indian side, IPC 144, a regulation that prohibits public gatherings, is still in force. IPC 144 presumably is the charge under which the first group of marchers were detained.

The group of 300 marchers are sitting to one side of the road, and have spent 3 nights there in the open winter air (the temperature in the evening gets as low as +6 degrees C). Health problems have increased, as the marchers also enjoy no water supply, shelter, or adequate food.

Today the Indian foreign minister is visiting the Nepal Prime Minister in Kathmandu. The visit is believed to correspond to Indian Republic Day. Bhutanese refugees is one of 3 items on their agenda. A couple of Bhutanese refugee groups in Birtamod (30 km east of Damak) are staging small demonstrations to coincide with the visit. Nepalese to create a greater Nepali nation.

The peace marchers ostensibly are being held for violating IPC (Indian Penal Code) 144, which was implemented in anticipation of the marches, and prohibits public demonstrations. In an interesting twist, some reports indicate the public prosecutor is challenging the legality of holding the marchers. Treatment of the refugees has been good, although 3 have fallen ill, including one who is currently in the hospital.

The marchers have all been given the option of release, if they sign a
"Personal Recommendation Bond" that promises they will no longer violate the peace in India. Thus far they have refused to sign the document.

The first group of peace marchers had planned to reach their destination of Thimphu, in Bhutan, on Monday, Feb 5. Observers are concerned that this group is willing to have their own blood shed if that is required to raise awareness, and the group has vowed not to return to the Nepalese camps.

Supporters inside India have also staged demonstrations in support of the marchers.

The mood among Bhutanese refugees in camps in Nepal is said to be hopeful. They hope the demonstrations will continue to raise awareness to their plight, which is in its six year with little sign of a pending resolution.

The refugees, totalling about 1/6 of the 600,000 people populating Bhutan, were forced to leave the country in the early 1990's after a "One Nation/ One People" policy effectively rendered them stateless. The international community has been thus far ineffective in resolving their plight. Bhutan has the largest percentage of its people living as refugees in the world.

****************************************** From: Rajesh Shrestha <rshresth@husc.harvard.edu> Date: Sat, 27 Jan 1996 14:12:27 -0500 (EST) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Rabat, Morocco

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Posted: soc.culture.nepal;soc.culture.morocco

I'll be attending a preparatory meeting of a conference in Rabat, Morocco in late February. It'll be my first time in north-Africa and I want to take the most out of it. However, I'm unaware of any other places of interest or countries that I must see around Morocco. I've contacted few travel agents but the responses that I've received are not satisfactory. These tours that I have been offered either come with an exorbitant price tag (beyond what I can afford) or with garbled information.

IF you happen to be a Nepali living in Morocco (!) or have visited Morocco as an adventure traveller (bag-packer, would be a better term) or a friend in Nepal(i) or aware of exotic facts about Morocco, you could please enlighten me.

I have a budget of $ 2500 (excluding airfare and 6 days of free stay in Rabat) and nothing to do between February 29 to March 21.

I would appreciate your quick response. Thanking you in advance.

Bhanu

************************************************* Date: Sun, 28 Jan 1996 15:56:57 EST To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: Arun Chandrakantan <chandrak@UMDNJ.EDU> Subject: Justice_In_Employment

                         DR GVV RAO LEGAL DEFENSE FUND

                          An Urgent Appeal For Support

           Dr GVV Rao is a Professional Engineer. With over thirty-
        three years of experience in twenty-eight countries, he has had
        a distinguished career which has included assignments for the
        United Nations and the US Agency for International Development.
        In January 1989 he took a position with the Fairfax County
        government in Virginia. His primary objective was to provide
        for the educational continuity of his two young children who
        were then in elementary and in middle school.

           Within three months of his joining the County, his then
        supervisor fired Dr Rao, alleging that his "redneck"
        subordinates did not want an "Indian" chief. The so-called
        "redneck" subordinates protested this misrepresentation, and Dr
        Rao filed a complaint with the US Equal Employment Opportunity
        Commission (EEOC). After an internal investigation of the
        outrageous behavior of his supervisor, the County reinstated Dr
        Rao. However, they transferred him to a newly created position
        with no job description or performance standards, and no
        supervisory responsibilities. It was obvious that the County's
        intent was to discredit Dr Rao and get rid of him for not
        performing any meaningful work. The offending supervisor,
        responsible for these atrocious acts and untruthful racially
        inflammatory statements, remains unpunished to this day.

           In spite of these disappointing circumstances, Dr Rao
        continued his well-regarded professional work and even received
        national recognition. He developed an Emergency Preparedness
        Program for Municipal Infrastructure which was the first of its
        kind in the nation; brought to the County the latest trenchless
        technologies for underground utility repair; and developed a
        model for Trading Water Pollution Credits. His work resulted in
        several papers, invitations by professional societies to be a
        keynote speaker, and an invitation to the White House for
        special recognition. In addition, he received several
        professional honors including an appointment as Affiliate
        Professor at George Mason University. He also received an
        appointment, by the National Council of Examiners in Engineering
        and Surveying (NCEES), as examiner in Environmental Engineering
        for PE (Professional Engineer) licensing examinations.

           Highly impressed by this performance, Dr Rao's new supervisor
        gave him excellent evaluations for three consecutive years.
        However, the County refused to promote Dr Rao on twenty-five
        occasions alleging that he lacked "engineering" qualifications.
        At the same time, the County promoted some mere high school
        graduates claiming that they were "better qualified." The
        ultimate injustice occurred when his boss, who had found his
        work to be excellent, left the County, and Dr Rao was the
        logical candidate for his boss's job. However, the County
        refused him this promotion.

           The EEOC investigated the matter over a period of four years,
        gave two determinations confirming that the County had
        discriminated against Dr Rao, and ordered his immediate
        promotion. The County not only refused to obey the EEOC orders,
        but additionally, in December 1994, fired Dr Rao. His dismissal
        came on pretextual grounds arranged by the individual who had
        taken his previous supervisor's position. Many mainstream
        leaders such as the President of the Fairfax County NAACP
        criticized this disgraceful behavior. The local media including
        TV Channel 8, and newspapers including the Washington Post,
        Fairfax Journal, Fairfax Times, etc, carried numerous stories on
        the case, and particularly on the Gandhian approach taken by Dr
        Rao. The Fairfax Times twice editorially criticized the County
        and admonished it to "settle the dispute with Rao."

           Under the current law, the EEOC cannot sue the County to
        enforce its own directives. Therefore, Dr Rao had to file suit
        in the US District Court to require the County to implement EEOC
        orders. Everyone familiar with the lawsuit believes that Dr Rao
        has a very strong case, and will ultimately win. However, right
        now he is forced to fight an expensive legal battle even though
        he has been unemployed for the past twelve months. The County
        reportedly formed a task force of seven lawyers to handle this
        case and is counting on Dr Rao breaking down and giving up the
        fight. Dr Rao does not want to give up because his lawsuit is a
        just cause. Furthermore, obtaining justice would help other
        Indian-Americans similarly mistreated by racists who have power
        and legal clout supported by the taxpayer. However, the reality
        of the situation is that Dr Rao needs to raise at least $20-
        25,000 just to finance the litigation. This cost does not
        include his family's expenses in the face of prolonged
        unemployment.

           Apart from his professional accomplishments, Dr Rao is also a
        selfless worker who is well respected by the Indian-American
        community in the Washington DC metropolitan area. He runs a
        very successful Sunday School called Bala Vikas for Indian-
        American youth, where students get free education in Indian
        culture, traditions and family values. Also, as Vice-Chairman
        of the Interfaith Council, he is a leader in promoting mutual
        respect and understanding among people practicing different
        faiths, including Hinduism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism,
        Judaism, Buddhism, Jainism, etc.

           As a concrete and tangible measure of their support,
        concerned friends, including some Indian-American faculty and
        students at George Mason University, have established the "Dr
        GVV Rao Legal Defense Fund" with the undersigned as the Chairman
        and Trustee. This letter is an appeal for contributions to this
        fund to help Dr Rao fight for justice. This case will
        ultimately help the entire Indian-American community, as well as
        other minorities in the United States.

           Please make checks payable to Dr GVV Rao Legal Defense Fund,
        and mail them to 10310 Main Street, Suite 107, Fairfax, VA
        22030. I am available to answer any questions or offer further
        clarification.

           Thank you all, in advance, for your generous assistance.
 
           Very sincerely yours,

                Prof VR Mulpuri, PhD
                Chairman, Justice & Dignity in Employment (JADE), and
                Trustee, Dr GVV Rao Legal Defense Fund.
                Residence: 703-239-0791
                Internet: rmulpuri@gmu.edu

           PLEASE PASS COPIES OF THIS APPEAL TO ALL OTHERS WHO MAY BE
        INTERESTED.

********************************************************************** From: Rajesh Shrestha <rshresth@husc.harvard.edu> Date: Mon, 29 Jan 1996 14:18:09 -0500 (EST) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: USA 1\29 NPR Chitwan report

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

National Public Radio is running a report about Chitwan National Park today (Monday 1/29). NPR stations often repeat the program each day so you may be able to catch it today. In Seattle it ran between 15 minutes and 30 mins after the hour.

The report states that Nepal is a poor country which has set aside considerable areas of land for national parks and wonders if this can continue in the face of an increasing population that is impoverished. (It is incorrectly stated that the population of Nepal has doubled since 1950 whereas actually it has doubled since 1970.)

An expat naturalist tells how the population of rhinos has increased from the brink of destruction since the park was established.

Broughton Coburn, the author of 2 books about Nepali Aama is interviewed.

Villagers explain how the rhinos from the park eat part of their crops and how they are powerless to do much about it. About six villagers per year are killed by rhinos and villagers are not allowed to gather firewood from the park lands. Moneys promised the local people when the park was established have not materialized.

The program ends with the question: How long can Nepal continue the park to preserve a world treasure and what will the world do to support the park?

-Frank

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