The Nepal Digest - Jan 9, 1995 (25 Push 2051 BkSm)

From: The Editor (nepal-request@cs.niu.edu)
Date: Mon Jan 09 1995 - 12:40:00 CST


Received: from mp.cs.niu.edu (mp.cs.niu.edu [131.156.1.2]) by library.wustl.edu (8.6.9/8.6.9) with SMTP id PAA17700 for <huestis@library.wustl.edu>; Mon, 9 Jan 1995 15:09:33 -0600
Received: by mp.cs.niu.edu id AA02515 (5.67b/IDA-1.5 for nepal-dist); Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:01 -0600
Received: by mp.cs.niu.edu id AA02495 (5.67b/IDA-1.5 for nepal-list); Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:00 -0600
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:00 -0600
Message-Id: <199501091840.AA02495@mp.cs.niu.edu>
Reply-To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu>
From: The Editor <nepal-request@cs.niu.edu>
Sender: "Rajpal J. Singh" <A10RJS1@cs.niu.edu>

Subject:      The Nepal Digest - Jan 9, 1995 (25 Push 2051 BkSm)
To: <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu>
Content-Type: text
Content-Length: 51749
Status: O
X-Status: 
X-Keywords:
X-UID: 79


        %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
        % N N EEEEEE PPPPPP AA L %
        % NN N E P P A A L %
        % N N N EEEE P P A A L %
        % N N N E PPPPPP AAAAAA L %
        % N NN E P A A L %
        % N N EEEEEE P A A LLLLLL %
        %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

The Nepal Digest Monday 9 Jan 95: Push 25 2051 BkSm Volume 35 Issue 5

  Note: There was a file update problem on the system last week. If
         you or one of your friends are not getting TND, please re-subscribe!
         Apologies for the inconvinience.

  Today's Topics:

        1. TAJA_KHABAR News from Nepal

        2. KURA_KANI
                  Economics - Re: NPC
                               Ethnic Bias in NPC?

        3. PUBLISHED ARTICLE - Vikas and Imperialist Nostalgia (KTM Post)

        4. KATHA_KABITA - Poem: Still Not Found

        5. JAN_KARI
                  Matrimonials
                     
        6. SODH_PUCH/KHOJ_KHABAR
                  Looking for .....

 ******************************************************************************
 * TND Board of Staff *
 * ------------------ *
 * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu *
 * SCN Liason: Rajesh B. Shrestha rshresth@black.clarku.edu *
 * Consultant Editor: Padam P. Sharma sharma@plains.nodak.edu *
 * Discussion Moderator: Ashutosh Tiwari tiwari@husc.harvard.edu *
 * Memberlist Archives: Sudeep Acharya sa01@engr.uark.edu *
 * TND Archives: Sohan Panta k945184@atlas.kingston.ac.uk *
 * *
 * Subscription/Deletion requests : NEPAL-REQUEST@MP.CS.NIU.EDU *
 * Provide one line message: sub nepal "lastname, firstname, mi" <user@host> *
 * [OPTIONAL] Provide few lines about your occupation, address, phone for *
 * TND database to: <A10RJS1@MP.CS.NIU.EDU> *
 * Snail-Mail Correspondences to: Rajpal J. Singh *
 * Founding-editor/Co-ordinator *
 * The Nepal Digest (TND) *
 * 502 West Lincoln Highway *
 * DeKalb, Illinois 60115, U.S.A. *
 * Digest Contributions: NEPAL@MP.CS.NIU.EDU *
 * Contributors need to supply Header for the article, email, and full name. *
 * *
 * Postings are divided into following categories that are listed in the *
 * order below. Please provide category-type in the header of your e-mail. *
 * *
 * 1. Message from TND Editorial Board *
 * 2. Letter to the Editor *
 * 3. TAJA_KHABAR: Current News *
 * 4. KATHA_KABITA: Literature *
 * 5. KURA_KANI: Economics *
 * Agriculture *
 * Forestry *
 * Health *
 * Education *
 * Technology *
 * Social Issues *
 * Cultural Issues *
 * Environment *
 * Tourism *
 * Foreign Policy *
 * History *
 * Military/Police *
 * Politics *
 * 6. Entertainment (Humor, Recipies, Movie Reviews, Sattaires etc.) *
 * 7. JAN_KARI: Classifides (Matrimonials, Jobs etc) *
 * 8. SODH_PUCHH/KHOJ_KHABAR (Inquiring about Nepali etc. ) *
 * 9. Immigration/Taxes *
 * 10. TITAR_BITAR: Miscellaneous *
 * *
 * The Nepal Digest(TND) is a publication of the Nepal Interest Group for *
 * news and discussions about issues concerning Nepal. All members of *
 * nepal@cs.niu.edu will get a copy of TND. Membership is open to all. *
 * THE EDITOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT ARTICLES FOR CLARITY. *
 * *
 * **** COPYRIGHT NOTE **** *
 * The news/article posters are responsible for any copyright violations. *
 * TND, a non-profit electronic journal, will publish articles that has *
 * been published in other electronic or paper journal with proper credit *
 * to the original media. *
 * *
 * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
 * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" -Dr. MLK *
 * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" - Sirdar_RJS_Khalifa *
 * *
 ******************************************************************************

********************************************************************** From: gshah@st6000.sct.edu (Gopal Shah) Subject: Matrimonial To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 11:48:05 -0500 (EST)

Thanks to all TND board members for this Matrimonial("Lami") section. Let's hope through this section many hearts will join together. At the moment, we have two candidates. If it works, we will have more candidates.

Descriptions:

Name: "Raju" Name: "Daya" Height: 5' 8" Height: 5' 5" Weight: 165 lbs. Weight: 155 lbs. Caste: Brahmin Caste: Brahmin Age Group: 25-30 yrs. Age Group: 25-30 yrs. Education:BA in Chemistry,MBA Education: BA in Chemistry Job: Work in a chemical company Job: Work in a chemical company Location: Georgia,USA LOcation: Georgia,USA

Looking for: Height: 5' 1" + Height: 4' 11"+ Age: 19 yrs+ Age: 19 yrs.+ Education: undergraduate Education: undergraduate

Interested candidates/parents can send confidential email to gshah@st6000.sct.edu. PLEASE DO NOT CALL.All the confidential reports including names will not be disclosed.

%%%% Editor's Note: Welocme to MATRIMONIALS! You quite possibly might %%%%
%%%% be the first romantic souls to be in matrimonial %%%%
%%%% "Nepali-Style" in Nepali history (Pratyoush, %%%%
%%%% please verify if I am correct). TND hopes more of %%%%
%%%% you will join in search of your soul mates. %%%%
%%%% %%%%
%%%% Best of wishes and good luck! %%%%
%%%% %%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

********************************************************************** Date: Sat, 08 Jan 1994 04:28:34 GMT To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: mikeyg@internode.net (Mike Gawryletz) Subject: Happy New Year

Hi there, Hope this finds you well... I'll keep this short:
   My wife's sister is moving to Kathmandu in April...was wondering if there was a way to E-mail to there.
                      mikeyg@internode.net

************************************************************ Date: Sat, 07 Jan 1995 13:53:32 MST To: a10rjs1@cs.niu.edu From: "VIVEK S. RANA" <RANA@CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU> Subject: Taja_Khabar

                Congressi Ambassadors resigns
                ----------------------------- News-Software: VAX/VMS VNEWS 1.41
 
        All the ambassador appionted politically by the Nepali Congress government resigned collectively yesterday. Those included were Thakkan Mallick (Burma), B.C. Malla (China), Gopal Sharma (Japan) Nepalese ambassador to Germany and Jai Raj Archarya Permanent UN Representative.
 
        The UML Government announced that it will soon fill up the vacant ambassadorial positions.
 
       The other news
 
        UML reinstated 49 civil servants that were retired (dismissed) by the Nepal Congress government.

********************************************************************** Date: 06 Jan 95 18:44:40 EST From: Rajendra.P.Shrestha@Dartmouth.EDU (Rajendra P. Shrestha) Subject: Newsbriefs To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

Trade Gap Soars as Carpet Sales Plunges Excerpts from Reuters report

   During the four months to mid-November, Nepal's trade deficit skyrocketed to 11.64 billion rupees ($232.9 million) from 4.87 billion rupees ($97.4 million) in the same period in 1993, Finance Ministry officials said.

   Imports surged 28.3 percent while exports dropped 17.5 percent, yielding a record trade gap.

   Much of Nepal's trade is with its southern neighbour, India, with which the kingdom had a 4.8 billion rupee ($96 million) trade deficit, the central bank said.

   Hand-knotted woollen carpets account for more than half of Nepal's exports to countries excluding India.

   Central bank officials who asked not to be identified said some foreign buyers upset over the use of child workers to make carpets, especially in Germany, had cut back on purchases.

   Carpet exports plunged 36 percent between mid-July and mid-November and clothing sales, for which figures were not available, were also expected to weaken, government officials said.

   Tulak Bikram Rana, chief controller of foreign exchange in the Nepal Rastra Bank, the country's central bank, said the kingdom's foreign exchange reserves could support 10 months of imports.

Five Envoys to be Recalled

Foreign ministry sources said Thursday that five Nepalese envoys will be recalled soon. The ambassadors to Burma, China, Germany, Japan, and the United Nations, all of whom are political appointees of the former Nepali Congress government, will be recalled. Career diplomats will not be recalled, the sources said. Narendra Bikram Shah will be asked to become the permanent representative to the United Nations, while Prof. Harsha Narayan Dhaubadel will become the abassador to India. Tulsi Lal Amatya, a veteral communist leader, is to be appointed as the ambassador to China. In an innovative move the new government has placed ads to fill vacancies for 17 other offices, positions that were traditionally given to party supporters. (Xinhua)

************************************************************* Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 19:02:03 -0500 (EST) Subject: On NPC: The Question WHY from McGill To: Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu>

This is from Ganesh Pandey at McGill University, Canada.

Why NPC?

It looks nice to have high sounding organizations, but I am confused on why do we need NPC? My confusions are based on the following points:

     - Before election, all political parties have outlined their
     economic programs in their election manifesto.
     
        - The ruling party is supposed to implement their election
     manifesto, at least in the beginning unless it turns out be
     bad for the country, rather than working for the new one.
             
        - This means planning is already over, hence there should
     be implementation commission not the planning
     commission.
             
        - If the ruling party wants to fine tune its programs, then
     NPC should be work under PM's supervision like all other
     ministries. Its responsibilities should be limited on the day
     to day task only.
             
        - If the above points are false and the NPC members really
     work hard to prepare economic planning then the ruling
     party must have lied in the election. Otherwise paying
     salary for NPC members is the waste of money. Lying, if
     NPC comes up with different plans not mentioned in the
     election agenda; Wastage, if they reconfirm the program
     outlined in the election manifesto.
     
        - Further, do the NPC members have some specific
     deadlines on the submission of their reports? If so why they
     keep on hanging on the post until the next government is
     elected? If they do not have any deadlines then they are
     working for the plans that will go in the waste basket? (all
     the previous plans of the NC members must be in the waste
     basket by now). Again waste of time and money.
     
        -Or they will be working for preparing election manifesto
     for the next election by using tax payer's money.
     
        - If it is very important and above politics like judiciary
     body then why is it reshuffled immediately after the
     election?
     
        -Provided it is above politics, then all political parties
     should be fighting the elections on the political ground not
     on the economic policies, which is highly unlikely.

     So no matter whether the NPC members are competent or incompetent, but I am the wondering why NPC is there in the first place? To give JAGIR for some party workers or to prepare backgrounds for another election?

Fact: I even don't know the definition of planning and have never taken any courses on economics. So please educate me.

-ganesh

          Ganesh R Pandey, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
          tel: (514) 8429057 (h), (514) 398 6871 (o)
          
********************************************************** From: ponta@sas.upenn.edu (Pratyoush R. Onta) Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - Jan 5, 1995 (21 Push 2051 BkSm) To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 20:03:37 -0500 (EST)

Published in The Kathmandu Post of 30 October 1994. Pratyoush

Vikas and Imperialist Nostalgia

By Lazima Onta & Pratyoush Onta

When asked about Nepal being often described as the Switzerland of Asia, Toni Hagen once said "It [Nepal] is a wonderful country. It is in fact more wonderful than Switzerland if you take into account the Nepali people. The people here are open-minded. They are always smiling. This is what the Swiss people have already lost. That is why Nepal is such a fascinating country for us. What we have lost you still have. My main concern is that with the opening of development aid in the region the Nepali people may lose their identity. This is the real danger. You can solve ecological problems. No amount of money can buy back the Nepali identity and culture" (The Independent , 25 November 1992). Hagen, who we know only through his writings, suffers from what the Stanford anthropologist Renato Rosaldo has described as "Imperialist Nostalgia" in his book Culture and Truth: The Remaking of Social Analysis (1989).

Imperialist nostalgia, as Rosaldo defines it, is "a particular kind of nostalgia, often found under imperialism, where people mourn the passing of what they themselves have transformed." In other words, agents of change, colonial and post-colonial, desire for the very forms of life they have altered or destroyed intentionally. Rosaldo analyzes the works of colonial military-administrators, missionaries and anthropologists like himself and his wife, the late Michelle Rosaldo, in the Philippines for evidence of imperialist nostalgia. The work of development consultants like Toni Hagen are not included in Rosaldo's analysis, but undoubtedly some members of this tribe provide the subject par excellence for studies looking for evidence of imperialist nostalgia today. Just take Hagen's example.

Hagen's credentials as an agent of development in Nepal are well known and need not be repeated here in their entirety. Over forty years ago, he first came here as a member of the Swiss Mission for Development Aid. While in Nepal, he did, among other things, extensive geological and aerial surveys. Later he was responsible for starting Nepal's carpet industry as part of the Tibetan refugee settlement program. His interventions as an agent of development, we would suppose, were made with the belief that life in Nepal could be improved through them. Without belittling his contributions to that end, it should be pointed out however that they must have been carried out in a rush with lack of self-reflectivity regarding the nature of changes he was helping to bring.

That development means change, and that although positive changes are hoped, it cannot be assured is a fact that nobody will quarrel with today. That development efforts in Nepal have already greatly affected "Nepali culture," both positively and negatively, is a fact that Hagen does not seem to be aware when he is warning us about the impending danger of our losing our "identity and culture." To say that his development efforts have not yet affected "Nepali culture" P pay some attention to the discussion about the carpet industry in Nepal today P is to make an untenable observation.

Moreover, for Hagen, our present "open-minded" and "always smiling" selves P is the Swiss past that no longer exists. By constructing such a time-line, Hagen compounds his imperialist nostalgia with an evolutionary language that made the modernisation paradigm so attractive not too long ago. Our development, that paradigm told us, was going to give us the living standards of the industrial West. We just had to be patient before we would "take off" to those standards. The ruins of that thought lay strewn over our and many others' landscapes all over the world. In truth, we are neither open-minded nor always smiling. The rigidities of our caste and partially feudal society hardly qualify us for these appellations. Our present is nobody's past. Nor is our future anybody's present. Swiss folks and us co-live in this world in the present.

Defunct Notion of Culture: One reason Hagen suffers from compounded imperialist nostalgia, we would like to suggest, is because of his adherence to a notion of culture that cannot be supported under close scrutiny. The notion that culture is static, something bounded, or only to be found amongst people "without history" has been discredited among certain brands of anthropologists who, because of historical connections, have had an academic monopoly over the word. That culture somehow only resides in life-cycle ceremonies, masked dances, and festivals, is a notion that is now difficult to support. The anthropology that propped up this increasingly defunct notion of culture largely legitimised itself, as Johannnes Fabian has argued vigorously in his book Time and the Other
(1983), by denying coevalness to its subjects of study.

This means that the people being studied were always thought to be existing in a time other than and prior to that in which the researcher lived much like Hagen's time-line discussed above. The more illiterate, the more rural, the more untounced by "modernity", the better was the primitive subject of anthropology. Primitive culture was sometimes thought to be what 'natives' deserved to have in the lower rungs of the evolutionary ladder, or at other times to reside in the functions that their social arrrangements performed to keep their primitiveness together. At other times culture was thought to be all in the native's head as postulated by an entire generation of cognitive anthropologists in the 1950s and the 1960s. Meandering through the thick descriptions of intrepretive anthropology and several variants of "pratice" theories and surviving the orgy of self-reflectivity that marked the "crisis" of anthropology in the 1980s (at least in the US), culture is now thought to be a hard-to-define, unbounded, variously localized, power-laden process.

When used in this sense, it becomes impossible to talk about "Nepali Culture" as if it has remained as yet unaffected by millions of development money that has poured into Nepal for the last 40 years. Moreover, if simplistic representations of Nepal and Nepalis are to be abandoned, we are not even sure what something like "Nepali culture" would consist of. Hagen says that "Nepali people might lose their identity" as if identity was a "thing" that was outside of and unaffected by time and politics. Identity is more fluid than he and others like him would grant us, although we recognise that it is not infinitely plastic. Supine prajas whose obeisance was described in mythical terms until yesterday can now call themselves sovereign. And if words like culture and identity are to make any sense, then people who use them better learn ways to encompass their fluidity.
 

Hagen helped bring change into Nepal even as he may wish that "Nepali identity and culture" remain unchanged. As Nepal now reels under the stress of change, Hagen feels that the destruction of this Nepali identity is his "main concern." Rosaldo wrote: "Imperialist nostalgia occurs alongside a peculiar sense of mission, 'the white man's burden,' where civilized nations stand duty-bound to uplift so-called savage ones....When the so-called civilizing process destablishes forms of life, the agents of change experience transformations of other cultures as if they were personal losses." Hagen, an agent of change, is now experiencing transformations in Nepal as a personal loss.

One might say that that is expected from someone who in the blurp to his 1961 book, Nepal, was described as someone who "can claim to know Nepal better than any other foreigner." There it is stated that behind the man who has travelled thousands of miles in Nepal " lie concealed such fatigue and privations as only few explorers have experienced." But if this is so then we say that it does not suit a man like Hagen to continue to mouth words like culture, identity, "open-minded" and "always smiling" when talking about Nepal and Nepalis. We expect him to do better.

By no means do we want to suggest that only foreign consultants like Hagen suffer from imperialist nostalgia and its above-explained link with denial of coevalness to Nepal and Nepalis. Hagen has lots of company, not only amongst foreign consultants but also among his Nepali counterparts who have now claimed "Nepali culture" as their subject of expertise. However, in most of the cases, their training as social scientists does not prepare them for suggesting remedial prescriptions required for interventionist vikas work. But this is a subject that deserves separate scrunity.

*********************************************************************** Date: 6 Jan 95 17:03 -0800 From: Anil Tuladhar <tuladhar@ppc.ubc.ca> To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Poem "Still Not Found"

           STILL NOT FOUND

Eyes see scene,
        Ears hear sound. Who is behind them,
        Still not found.

Heart a fleshy lump
        Acting as a pump. Throbs incessently
        Sending blood around. Who is monitoring it
        Still not found.

No wonder brain is there
        An organic computer. Doing all calulations while
        Weighing just a pound. Who is operating it,
        Still not found.

Every system with proper provisions
        Every organ with proper labour division. Nay whole design is prone to age
        And decay bound. Who is that failing engineer,
        Still not found.

-ANIL

*********************************************************************** Date: Sat, 7 Jan 1995 22:33:37 +0900 From: Gyaneswor Pokharel <g44329a@nucc.cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp> To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu

Ashu wrote ?
>>>I would rather have a rigorously trained (in ANY
>>>discipline, including mathematics or history!)intelligent GENERALIST who
>>>shows these three qualities...
>>
Then, Belbase wrote!

>>I definitely agree with you there. Certainly "experts" who have been
>>doing narrow research for years would be better in universities. However,
        =============================================================
>>experts who have a multi or interdisciplinary education and work experience
B ################################### B >>(preferable lots of it) would, I think, be great. B >> My comment:
==========
        Before,Belbase ji make further comment on experts...., I want to raise objections regarding his comment on the aforementioned statements.

As the world is moving from 20th century to 21st century, you can see many new disciplines have emerged or divided/separted from mother discipline, whether it is your maths or my civil engineering branch. In the first half of this century, the civil , mechanical or electrical engineering were distinguished only after the completion of second year studies. Now it has almost come to a stage that you may not be allowed to switch just after you complete first year course, because the discipline has become such a vast that the rest three year is not enough to study even the basic of civil engineering and most of the universities just outline today what is basic philosophy in civil engineering and they give the rest responsibility to the organisation/company where the graduate will work. The company usually train these fresh employees according to their demand and they become very specialized in their field, rather than confusing with vast knowledge, which is sometimes called as "jack of all - master of none". Then, some of those students who completed undergraduate enter into the Masters level where usually 30 hour credit is expected to complete within one year. In these 30 credit you can usually take 10-12 subjects, thus within these 10 subjects if you go for really multidisciplinary subjects from history to mathematics then I wonder what the student can learn and I will raise why should the student be given Masters degree in the particular subject because he hardly knows the subject matter of his discipline. Fruthermore, most of the universities offer one year research program in second year of Masters degree which should be considered by the student the year allocated to understand the ways to tackle problems related to his discipline, rather than calling him-self expert of that narrow Masters thesis topic. If you really do independent research as Masters thesis, you can tackle all most all the problems related to your Masters level studeis and also can identify the solutions to Many problems
(provided you have enough time) relevent to your undergraduate discipline, too. Therfore, my conclusion is that research you do at universities is aimed to teach you how to tackle problems rather than confining yourself the Master of your thesis title. Once, you succeed conducting research studies you are supposed to handle most of the problem encountered as practicing man " professional".

        Eventhough I hear multi-disciplinary courses offered in many universities, do you really think they are really multi-disciplinary ? My understanding is that they are multi-disciplinary within the framwork of mother discipline.

        You said Research works in the univesity only. This is not correct. The usefullness of a research depends on what level of research you conduct. If your research is realted to a topic of industrial demand, which is called a basic research, then the research output is instantly implemented by the industry or the public. Otherwise, the research will be published in a journal and piled in library for years and if worth someone in next century may dig it out, other I call it just a production of #PAPER# good for recycling in developed countries and for packing
#chana chat-pat# in Nepal, nothing else. Therefore, those who do the research what public/industry demands can work everywhere and need not be confined in the university. Only thing is you should be practical researcher rather than theoretician talking about millions of light year away galaxy.

Eknath ji, I will put one joke and I express my sincere applogies because there is one character who is also mathmatecian. This joke is not meant to hurt you.

" many of us have heard of the following joke, I also heard this in my school days where I used to mean in different way than I mean here : (It was also told by one very famous Professor as well as vetran professional practicing engineer in an international conference of my field).

        Somewhere, one beautifull girl wanted to get marry. So, she posted a wanted notice and based on her requirements two candidates were screened for final selection. Then, she proposed one last question, when she asked them to stand 5m away on right and left sides. Then, she said O.K> gentlemen, you are allowed to jump once only half of the distance between you and me. Out of these two candidates one was professional engineer and the other was excellent pure-mathematician. Both had good knowledge of mathmatics.

Just after the whistle they started jumping, and approaching her. Within 6th jump the professional engineer touched whereas the pure mathematician was still calculating the 5/2, 5/4, 5/8... and so on. The girl announced that she is going to marry with the engineer. When asked to engineer why did you touched her when the distance was still about 15cm, then he said in his calculation compared to 5m the 15 cm was tolerance (3%), so he thought it is enough.

The girl's reply was that she was searching a practical man who works according to situation and importance of the objective, thats why the engineer was more practical , so was her selection.

In layman's concept she married with the engineer because he earns money in Nepal more than usual mathematics teacher.

Therefore, we should do research practical and situational which is acceptable in practice as well as in university teaching.

Thanks.

Gyaneswor Pokharel

P.S. Happy new year to all TND staff and readers.

******************************************************************* From: Ashutosh Tiwari <tiwari@husc.harvard.edu> Subject: Mid-Night Thoughts While Listening to Bacchu Kailash To: Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu>
                                
        What follows is very long; if you do not have the time, please skip this, but, if interested, please read later at your leisure. Thank you. ashu
                                
        Previous [personal] letter from Ganesh Pandey, a long post by Padam Sharma, and a recent post by Amulya Tuladhar have convinced me that my views on 'what makes a leader', either in Nepal in general and the NPC in specific, have been seriously misinterpreted to serve a rather NARROW set of criteria.

        Perhaps I had not made my points clearly: Let me make another attempt.

        1) WESTERN EDUCATION: I was surprised that almost all commentators, on both TND and SCN, seemed to assume, rather automatically, that I was talking about western educational degrees as some sort of prerequisites to being [political or other kinds of] leaders in Nepal. I WAS NOT! Nowhere in my various posts have I mentioned that a western education works wonders to be a political or other kinds of leaders/ministers and so on in Nepal.

        Nepalis of any ethnicity, educated anywhere, either formally or informally, can become leaders -- especially in things away from politics
-- if only they demonstrate and continue on with both the commitment and the dedication to their chosen public or private causes. [Dilli Choudhary is not that educated by the standards of almost all TND readers; but he's doing much more amazing and influential work! And I'm sure that there are other such leaders, of all ethnic groups, in all regions, quietly bringing about positive changes in their communities.]

        2) QUALIFICATION OF MINISTERS: I understand that both political and personal considerations on the part of the prime minister -- regardless of the Party s/he represents -- do play a big role in who becomes ministers and so forth. But I believe that being a Nepali State Minister SHOULD not be a cushy reward for party karya-kartas on the mere basis of their seniority, number of years served in jail, their personal suffering and other highly subjective criteria.

        To be sure, their seniority, years spent in jail and suffering under the Panchayat should be honored and publicly respected; but those 'points' must not be the OVERWHELMINGLY DOMINANT criteria for any new prime minister to choose his ministers. A minister, after all, is there to serve the entire nation. And that is why, in a little more ideal Nepal, the
"baggage of qualifications" -- consisting of education, professional training, experience, competence, sensitivity, integrity and so forth -- that a person -- of any party -- is likely to bring to meet the
"challenges facing the country" would be given more serious considerations.
[I am aware, however, that this is also a set of subjective criteria; yet, I would argue that these represent at least a BETTER or at least more publicly palatable degree of subjectivity than the previous set.]

        As a citizen of Nepal, I am heartened, however, by two recent acts of the UML government: A) Their decision to make the wealth-figure of the ministers public; and B) Their decision to fill in the general manager-ship of various corporations by publicly soliciting resumes.
        
        [Of course, with regard to B), I would have been even happier had the government gone ahead with the gradual privatization of those corporations so that the shareholders themselves could hire and fire their OWN managers. That would at least free the government to be the umpire to make and enforce relevant [business] laws so that LEGALLY FAIR processes of business could prevail.]

        3) NPC: In his last post on TND, Amulya called for an ethnically diverse NPC. I agree with Amulya's conclusion, but NOT with his reasoning. Here's why:

        First, Amulya wonders how come there are no other Nepali "experts" beyond the usual representation of bahun-chettri-newar (in that order!).

        [Aside: this is reminiscent of the 'fights' going on in the American academy to hire and tenure Black faculty members: The argument there being, with 11 percent of Americans being Blacks, how come there are not enough Black professors at the universities? A good, sincere question, but a depressing one -- when you consider that the number of Black scholars with PhDs is disproportionately so low that most American universities are simply reduced to the game of chasing the same handful of Black scholars from coast to coast. But the over-arching remedy here is not to hire Black professors indiscriminately just to increase their number on campus but to do two things: First, continue to recruit aggressively; and, second, more importantly, do everything possible to attract, support, nurture and encourage more and more Black students to consider careers in the academia. The latter, I believe, is lot more important for the FUTURE of the American academy if diversity is to continue to be cherished, respected and celebrated.]

        In Nepal, ethnic diversity should matter and should be celebrated and respected publicly through all media of communication. I agree with Amulya, Dor Bahadur Bista notwithstanding, that for too long only a few select groups of bahun-chettri-and-Kathmandu ka newars have dominated the socio-political structure in Nepal [read: Kathmandu].

        I agree too that the state must take the marginalization of various communities into consideration when making decisions regarding public health, education and so forth. Indeed, how to bring the usually neglected jana-jatis and the tarai-basi into the center of "development activities" should be the concern of any Nepali government -- though, quite frankly, my knowledge and experience are too inadequate to suggest exactly HOW.

        [However, I do think that the American-style Affirmative Action would be harder to work with in Nepal, where just about everybody seems to be some sort of an ethnic minority. For example, Newars, on the strength of their number, would certainly count as even 'smaller' minorities than, say, the Bhojpuris. Yet, despite their smaller percentage-of-the-population, no one can deny that Newars, as a group, have done visibly much better (that is, in education, business, industries and so on) than the collective visible gains of the Bhojpuris. Now, how would the American-style affirmative action -- which, in theory, should be fair to ALL minorities -- take such extant differences into account? Aside: What do other Nepalis think? What do former Peace Corps volunteers think about this?]

        Having said all that, let me argue -- if on the contrary -- that Amulyas's implied reasoning for an ethnically diverse NPC is flawed. I think it would be a disaster to hand out an NPC post to, say, Mr. Nar Bahadur Tamang, PhD (a fictitious name) just because he's a Tamang or to hand another NPC portfolio to Mrs. Shyama Lawati (another fictitious name) just because she's a woman. To hire Mr Tamang and Mrs. Lawati SOLELY on the basis of their ethnicity and gender is to INSULT both the Tamangs and the women, and to pander to the potentially divisive idea of ethnic and gender tokenism.

        Sure, I agree that ethnicity and gender should matter, and that people who had historically been denied access to 'higher' opportunities should be given chances -- BUT ONLY AND ONLY WHEN ALL ELSE IS EQUAL. In other words, the hiring criteria for Mr. Tamang should be that he's a professionally respected expert (of whatever that's relevant to NPC) first; NOT that he's an educated Tamang and that that's the ONLY criterion to get into NPC! Still, in other words, to be hired in NPC or any other organizations, being an educated Tamang should be the feather in Mr. Tamang's cap -- not the cap itself! [Remember, Dr. Harka Bdr. Gurung? Isn't it safe to say that regardless of his ethnicity, Gurung is the most-respected-professionally geographer of his generation in Nepal? And that we can say that . .. isn't that wonderful?]

        Otherwise, by using Amulys's 'ethnic criteria' to choose NPC members, I fear that in an ethnically diverse nation-state like ours, there is great potential for misuse and abuse of the "ethnic-card". [Here, I wonder how relevant a discussion of India's Mandal Commission would be . . .!]

        Of course, the best way to train Nepal's future policy-makers is to spend more money on and make the quality of instruction better at Nepal's hundreds of public schools -- from those in Fikkal, Ilam to those in Dadheldhura -- that have unfortunately been NOT able to train ALL students of all backgrounds and ethnicities everywhere to be active, participating citizens! [Another argument against BKS!].

        4) Finally, a few words on Amulyas's quibble regarding the economics departments at Harvard [and LSE] and his implication that what they teach is NOT relevant to most Nepalis:
        
        To that all I can generally say is this: Sure, I may not have learnt many 'relevant-to-Nepal' things at my university, but I've surely learnt to think much better and more clearly (at least, in moments of desperation, that's what I would like to believe!) than when I first arrived here. I am sure that most of you feel the same way about your universities either in the US or elsewhere.

        And now that I've been taught to think a little more sharply, I, as a citizen of Nepal, like many of you, cannot stop attempting to apply my parts of my academic training to think more clearly and in detail about the problems, the challenges, the opportunities and the successes facing Nepal -- the place where I sincerely hope to establish a career (after first paying back my depressingly large amount of educational loans, that is! :-). Still, if education in the United States or elsewhere prepares many of you and me to make a meaningful contribution to Nepal -- either from abroad or by physically being in Nepal
-- in whatever way to your tole, community, jilla, gaun or chosen profession, then I would say that that in and of itself IS RELEVANT TO ALL NEPALIS, regardless of whether you study economics or history or philosophy or mathematics or computer science or engineering!

        Enough said. What do others think? See you at the end of Januray. Bacchu Kailash has reached the end of the tape . . .

namaste ashu
         
******************************************************************* Date: Sun, 08 Jan 1995 16:01:13 -0500 (EST) From: Shirish <RANJITS@WABASH.EDU> Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - Jan 6,
 1995 (22 Push 2051 BkSm)Ethnic Bias in NPC

I against these types of separatist ideas. We have to select the commission on the basis of academic excellence because this commission is responsible for bulding our country. Hey we are all Nepalese and our main interest is to make the country better not worse by separating ourselves in different groups. We have to be loyal to our country and its development. We should spend our energy in up bringing all the people's life. So why argue in how the NPC should compose. We should select those who are able to bring some change not the bullshitters.

Anyway, make peace and be one, lets not divide ourselves. We have to be strong by being together.

************************************************************************* Date: Sun, 8 Jan 1995 17:07:04 -0500 From: rajendra@coos.dartmouth.edu (Rajendra P. Shrestha) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Deputy PM to visit India in February

Deputy PM to visit India soon

Excerpts from AFP, UPI and Xinhua reports

   The Nepalese Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal will visit India next month to pave the way for a visit by Prime Minister Manmohan Adhikari. In an interview with the official Rising Nepal, Mr. Nepal said, "Although there has not been a formal invitation from india for my visit, it has been thought that the visit will take place in the first week of february and talks are going on for the visit." "We are still in a process of preparation and issues to be taken up in New Delhi are yet to be finalized," he said.

   The Nepalese premier is due in India in March at the invitation of Indian Prime Minister Narasimha Rao. It will be his first foreign visit after taking office as Nepal's first communist prime minister in November.

   Trade, an open border, Bhutanese refugees and the Tanakpur accord with India will be some of the issues to be discussed, the newspaper quoted the minister as saying. In the interview, Nepal said that the 1040-kilometre (650-mile) frontier should be regulated to check smuggling and illegal immigration from India.

   He also said that Nepal will seek Indian and international support to send home more than 100,000 Bhutanese refugees living in camps in East Nepal. In the interview, the minister said that ''Bhutan should take back its people with honor and dignity because Nepal could not continue to bear the heavy burden of the refugees. ''For this, we expect good understanding from the Bhutanese government and seek cooperation and support from India and the international community.'' Nepal's previous government, run by the Nepali Congress party that was defeated in November's election, attempted unsuccessfully to resolve the refugee crisis through bilateral negotiations with Bhutan.

  The minister also said that the thorny issue of the Tanakpur dam treaty would also be on the agenda. The two countries signed an agreement in 1991 whereby Nepal would receive free electricity and water from the India-based hydro-electric facility in exchange for land in Nepal used by the project. But the treaty still needs to be ratified by the Nepalese parliament. In the interview, Mr. Nepal said that the new government would seek "corrections" to the Tanakpur River accord. ''Prior to the ratification by Parliament, the Tanakpur accord needs some corrections,'' he said. The communists, when they were the opposition, accused the Nepali Congress party of selling Nepalese interests in the multi-purpose river project on the common river border with India. ''Without a good understanding between the leaders of the two countries, the Tanakpur problem cannot be sorted out easily.''

More than 50,000 Children Labourers in Kathmandu

   A study by the Child Welfare Centre in Kathmandu has reported that there are more than 50,000 children below the age of 14 working as labourers in Kathmandu, writes the daily Kantipur. Of these 9,500 are working as domestic helpers. Some 20 percent of the children serving as domestic servants said they had been sexually abused by their employers.

   Some 6,000 children are employed in restaurants, most of them working more than 13 hours daily. Another 8,000 are working in garment and carpet industries, the report says. Apart from this, 5,000 others are involved in prostitution, about 25,000 are homeless and there are nearly 300 street children in Kathmandu Valley. The average age of girl children in prostitution is from 11 to 17, the report says. According to the report, More than 70 percent of the child labourers are illiterate.

   Meanwhile, the government has postponed the issuing of "child labour free" certificates to Nepalese carpet manufacturers for unspecified reasons. The "child labour free" certificate was originally due to come into force over two weeks ago. (DPA, Xinhua)

Government Asks World Bank to Postpone Meeting on Arun Project

   The Nepali government has asked the World Bank to postpone its January 9 meeting scheduled to decide the fate of the Arun-III hydro project. In a letter to the Bank, the Nepalese government is seeking a three week delay to explore avenues of cutting down the cost of the project and easing some of the Bank's conditionalities.

   Water resources state minister Hari Pandey, speaking to Xinhua, said, "if the road to the project area is constructed by nepalese instead of foreigners, the country would save 3.6 billion rupees
(73.46 million us dollars) for the 800 million us dollars project." Asked about if the world bank would be willing to ease the "harsh" conditionalities, Pandey said, "we should not blame the world bank because these conditionalities were imposed as the previous governments could not keep financial discipline nor guarantee proper use of the loans."

   The world bank's conditionalities on the Arun Project include:
-- only those experts deputized by the bank should be employed on the
   project,
-- the power tariffs in nepal should be increased 85 percent
   till 1999,
-- the government should accept the terms put forward by the
   multinational corporations with regard to small economic structures,
-- the government should not undertake small and big economic
   construction projects without getting the permission of the world
   bank.

Supreme Court Reinstates Fired Workers

Excerpts from UPI report

   Two special benches of the Supreme Court has ordered the reinstatement of 39 civil servants forced into retirement by the previous administration. The court said the decision of the previous government under the Nepali Congress party, which had forcibly retired 2,000 workers to streamline the administration was illegal. The supreme court also rejected the petition by the previous administration to review the court's decision to reinstate 26 employees it had ordered rehired. The previous administration's decision to push employees into retiring was immediately questioned when it rehired 11 people as secretaries in various ministries on a contract basis.

Custom Officials Intercept Money

Excerpts from UPI report

   Customs officials at Katmandu International Airport have recovered more than $500,000 in cash and traveler's checks from a Danish national and a toilet on an aircraft about to take off for Hong Kong. Customs officials found more than $360,000 in cash and $28,000 in traveler's checks in the toilet while searching the Royal Nepal Airlines plane shortly before it was to take off for Hong Kong. Police found another $100,000 in cash and $25,000 in traveler's checks on a Danish national who was going to Hong Kong on the same aircraft. The money was hidden in bandages around the Dane's legs, airport officials said. The Dane was arrested for questioning, authorities said.

King Accepts Resignations of five Ambassadors

Excerpts from UPI and Reuters reports

   King Birendra has accepted the resignations of five ambassadors, officials said Saturday. An official statement issued on Saturday said King Birendra had accepted the resignations of ambassadors Bharat Prasad Dhital (Tokyo), Basudev Chandra Malla (Beijing), Gopal Prasad Sharma (Bonn), Thakkan Malik (Rangoon), and Jaya Raj Acharya, Nepal's permanent representative to the United Nations. All five were appointed by former prime minister Girija Prasad Koirala, whose party was defeated in recent elections.

   Sources in the Nepalese foreign ministry, seeking anonymity, said however that all five were asked to step down after the Communist Party of Nepal -Unified Marxist-Leninist (UML) formed the minority government in November 1994.

    Nepal has not appointed any ambassador to Washington after Yog Prasad Upadhyaya was recalled in 1993 following differences between him and Koirala.

   The communist government will also have to appoint a new ambassador to New Delhi, a post which is lying vacant after Chakra Prasad Bastola resigned to be elected to the Nepalese parliament.

   The new government has appointed Basudev Dhungana, a former minister and a lawyer as ambassador to China, while Narendra Bikram Shah, a former diplomat will head the Nepali mission to the United Nations, foreign ministry sources said.

***********************************************************************************************

*********************************************************************************************** Date: Mon, 09 Jan 95 08:42:44 EST From: "Thapa, Khagendra" <KTHAPA@MUSIC.FERRIS.EDU> To: <nepal@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Looking for my friend

I am looking for my friend Bimal Keshary Poudel. He used to teach in Forestry Institute in Hetauda. I was told he is somewhere in Malaysia now. I wonder if anybody knows where he is now. I would really appreciate it if you could send me his internet address (if available). I have been working at Ferris State University for the last seven years.

Dr. Khagendra Thapa Professor, Surveying Engineering Big Rapids, Michigan.

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%% %%
%% END OF "THE NEPAL DIGEST". %%
%% %%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Tue Jan 11 2000 - 11:15:35 CST The Nepal Digest: The Nepal Digest - Jan 9, 1995 (25 Push 2051

The Nepal Digest - Jan 9, 1995 (25 Push 2051 BkSm)

From: The Editor (nepal-request@cs.niu.edu)
Date: Mon Jan 09 1995 - 12:40:00 CST


Received: from mp.cs.niu.edu (mp.cs.niu.edu [131.156.1.2]) by library.wustl.edu (8.6.9/8.6.9) with SMTP id PAA17700 for <huestis@library.wustl.edu>; Mon, 9 Jan 1995 15:09:33 -0600
Received: by mp.cs.niu.edu id AA02515 (5.67b/IDA-1.5 for nepal-dist); Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:01 -0600
Received: by mp.cs.niu.edu id AA02495 (5.67b/IDA-1.5 for nepal-list); Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:00 -0600
Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 12:40:00 -0600
Message-Id: <199501091840.AA02495@mp.cs.niu.edu>
Reply-To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu>
From: The Editor <nepal-request@cs.niu.edu>
Sender: "Rajpal J. Singh" <A10RJS1@cs.niu.edu>

Subject:      The Nepal Digest - Jan 9, 1995 (25 Push 2051 BkSm)
To: <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu>
Content-Type: text
Content-Length: 51749
Status: O
X-Status: 
X-Keywords:
X-UID: 79


        %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
        % N N EEEEEE PPPPPP AA L %
        % NN N E P P A A L %
        % N N N EEEE P P A A L %
        % N N N E PPPPPP AAAAAA L %
        % N NN E P A A L %
        % N N EEEEEE P A A LLLLLL %
        %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

The Nepal Digest Monday 9 Jan 95: Push 25 2051 BkSm Volume 35 Issue 5

  Note: There was a file update problem on the system last week. If
         you or one of your friends are not getting TND, please re-subscribe!
         Apologies for the inconvinience.

  Today's Topics:

        1. TAJA_KHABAR News from Nepal

        2. KURA_KANI
                  Economics - Re: NPC
                               Ethnic Bias in NPC?

        3. PUBLISHED ARTICLE - Vikas and Imperialist Nostalgia (KTM Post)

        4. KATHA_KABITA - Poem: Still Not Found

        5. JAN_KARI
                  Matrimonials
                     
        6. SODH_PUCH/KHOJ_KHABAR
                  Looking for .....

 ******************************************************************************
 * TND Board of Staff *
 * ------------------ *
 * Editor/Co-ordinator: Rajpal J. Singh a10rjs1@mp.cs.niu.edu *
 * SCN Liason: Rajesh B. Shrestha rshresth@black.clarku.edu *
 * Consultant Editor: Padam P. Sharma sharma@plains.nodak.edu *
 * Discussion Moderator: Ashutosh Tiwari tiwari@husc.harvard.edu *
 * Memberlist Archives: Sudeep Acharya sa01@engr.uark.edu *
 * TND Archives: Sohan Panta k945184@atlas.kingston.ac.uk *
 * *
 * Subscription/Deletion requests : NEPAL-REQUEST@MP.CS.NIU.EDU *
 * Provide one line message: sub nepal "lastname, firstname, mi" <user@host> *
 * [OPTIONAL] Provide few lines about your occupation, address, phone for *
 * TND database to: <A10RJS1@MP.CS.NIU.EDU> *
 * Snail-Mail Correspondences to: Rajpal J. Singh *
 * Founding-editor/Co-ordinator *
 * The Nepal Digest (TND) *
 * 502 West Lincoln Highway *
 * DeKalb, Illinois 60115, U.S.A. *
 * Digest Contributions: NEPAL@MP.CS.NIU.EDU *
 * Contributors need to supply Header for the article, email, and full name. *
 * *
 * Postings are divided into following categories that are listed in the *
 * order below. Please provide category-type in the header of your e-mail. *
 * *
 * 1. Message from TND Editorial Board *
 * 2. Letter to the Editor *
 * 3. TAJA_KHABAR: Current News *
 * 4. KATHA_KABITA: Literature *
 * 5. KURA_KANI: Economics *
 * Agriculture *
 * Forestry *
 * Health *
 * Education *
 * Technology *
 * Social Issues *
 * Cultural Issues *
 * Environment *
 * Tourism *
 * Foreign Policy *
 * History *
 * Military/Police *
 * Politics *
 * 6. Entertainment (Humor, Recipies, Movie Reviews, Sattaires etc.) *
 * 7. JAN_KARI: Classifides (Matrimonials, Jobs etc) *
 * 8. SODH_PUCHH/KHOJ_KHABAR (Inquiring about Nepali etc. ) *
 * 9. Immigration/Taxes *
 * 10. TITAR_BITAR: Miscellaneous *
 * *
 * The Nepal Digest(TND) is a publication of the Nepal Interest Group for *
 * news and discussions about issues concerning Nepal. All members of *
 * nepal@cs.niu.edu will get a copy of TND. Membership is open to all. *
 * THE EDITOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO EDIT ARTICLES FOR CLARITY. *
 * *
 * **** COPYRIGHT NOTE **** *
 * The news/article posters are responsible for any copyright violations. *
 * TND, a non-profit electronic journal, will publish articles that has *
 * been published in other electronic or paper journal with proper credit *
 * to the original media. *
 * *
 * +++++ Food For Thought +++++ *
 * "If you don't stand up for something, you will fall for anything" -Dr. MLK *
 * "Democracy perishes among the silent crowd" - Sirdar_RJS_Khalifa *
 * *
 ******************************************************************************

********************************************************************** From: gshah@st6000.sct.edu (Gopal Shah) Subject: Matrimonial To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Date: Mon, 9 Jan 1995 11:48:05 -0500 (EST)

Thanks to all TND board members for this Matrimonial("Lami") section. Let's hope through this section many hearts will join together. At the moment, we have two candidates. If it works, we will have more candidates.

Descriptions:

Name: "Raju" Name: "Daya" Height: 5' 8" Height: 5' 5" Weight: 165 lbs. Weight: 155 lbs. Caste: Brahmin Caste: Brahmin Age Group: 25-30 yrs. Age Group: 25-30 yrs. Education:BA in Chemistry,MBA Education: BA in Chemistry Job: Work in a chemical company Job: Work in a chemical company Location: Georgia,USA LOcation: Georgia,USA

Looking for: Height: 5' 1" + Height: 4' 11"+ Age: 19 yrs+ Age: 19 yrs.+ Education: undergraduate Education: undergraduate

Interested candidates/parents can send confidential email to gshah@st6000.sct.edu. PLEASE DO NOT CALL.All the confidential reports including names will not be disclosed.

%%%% Editor's Note: Welocme to MATRIMONIALS! You quite possibly might %%%%
%%%% be the first romantic souls to be in matrimonial %%%%
%%%% "Nepali-Style" in Nepali history (Pratyoush, %%%%
%%%% please verify if I am correct). TND hopes more of %%%%
%%%% you will join in search of your soul mates. %%%%
%%%% %%%%
%%%% Best of wishes and good luck! %%%%
%%%% %%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

********************************************************************** Date: Sat, 08 Jan 1994 04:28:34 GMT To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: mikeyg@internode.net (Mike Gawryletz) Subject: Happy New Year

Hi there, Hope this finds you well... I'll keep this short:
   My wife's sister is moving to Kathmandu in April...was wondering if there was a way to E-mail to there.
                      mikeyg@internode.net

************************************************************ Date: Sat, 07 Jan 1995 13:53:32 MST To: a10rjs1@cs.niu.edu From: "VIVEK S. RANA" <RANA@CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU> Subject: Taja_Khabar

                Congressi Ambassadors resigns
                ----------------------------- News-Software: VAX/VMS VNEWS 1.41
 
        All the ambassador appionted politically by the Nepali Congress government resigned collectively yesterday. Those included were Thakkan Mallick (Burma), B.C. Malla (China), Gopal Sharma (Japan) Nepalese ambassador to Germany and Jai Raj Archarya Permanent UN Representative.
 
        The UML Government announced that it will soon fill up the vacant ambassadorial positions.
 
       The other news
 
        UML reinstated 49 civil servants that were retired (dismissed) by the Nepal Congress government.

********************************************************************** Date: 06 Jan 95 18:44:40 EST From: Rajendra.P.Shrestha@Dartmouth.EDU (Rajendra P. Shrestha) Subject: Newsbriefs To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

Trade Gap Soars as Carpet Sales Plunges Excerpts from Reuters report

   During the four months to mid-November, Nepal's trade deficit skyrocketed to 11.64 billion rupees ($232.9 million) from 4.87 billion rupees ($97.4 million) in the same period in 1993, Finance Ministry officials said.

   Imports surged 28.3 percent while exports dropped 17.5 percent, yielding a record trade gap.

   Much of Nepal's trade is with its southern neighbour, India, with which the kingdom had a 4.8 billion rupee ($96 million) trade deficit, the central bank said.

   Hand-knotted woollen carpets account for more than half of Nepal's exports to countries excluding India.

   Central bank officials who asked not to be identified said some foreign buyers upset over the use of child workers to make carpets, especially in Germany, had cut back on purchases.

   Carpet exports plunged 36 percent between mid-July and mid-November and clothing sales, for which figures were not available, were also expected to weaken, government officials said.

   Tulak Bikram Rana, chief controller of foreign exchange in the Nepal Rastra Bank, the country's central bank, said the kingdom's foreign exchange reserves could support 10 months of imports.

Five Envoys to be Recalled

Foreign ministry sources said Thursday that five Nepalese envoys will be recalled soon. The ambassadors to Burma, China, Germany, Japan, and the United Nations, all of whom are political appointees of the former Nepali Congress government, will be recalled. Career diplomats will not be recalled, the sources said. Narendra Bikram Shah will be asked to become the permanent representative to the United Nations, while Prof. Harsha Narayan Dhaubadel will become the abassador to India. Tulsi Lal Amatya, a veteral communist leader, is to be appointed as the ambassador to China. In an innovative move the new government has placed ads to fill vacancies for 17 other offices, positions that were traditionally given to party supporters. (Xinhua)

************************************************************* Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 19:02:03 -0500 (EST) Subject: On NPC: The Question WHY from McGill To: Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu>

This is from Ganesh Pandey at McGill University, Canada.

Why NPC?

It looks nice to have high sounding organizations, but I am confused on why do we need NPC? My confusions are based on the following points:

     - Before election, all political parties have outlined their
     economic programs in their election manifesto.
     
        - The ruling party is supposed to implement their election
     manifesto, at least in the beginning unless it turns out be
     bad for the country, rather than working for the new one.
             
        - This means planning is already over, hence there should
     be implementation commission not the planning
     commission.
             
        - If the ruling party wants to fine tune its programs, then
     NPC should be work under PM's supervision like all other
     ministries. Its responsibilities should be limited on the day
     to day task only.
             
        - If the above points are false and the NPC members really
     work hard to prepare economic planning then the ruling
     party must have lied in the election. Otherwise paying
     salary for NPC members is the waste of money. Lying, if
     NPC comes up with different plans not mentioned in the
     election agenda; Wastage, if they reconfirm the program
     outlined in the election manifesto.
     
        - Further, do the NPC members have some specific
     deadlines on the submission of their reports? If so why they
     keep on hanging on the post until the next government is
     elected? If they do not have any deadlines then they are
     working for the plans that will go in the waste basket? (all
     the previous plans of the NC members must be in the waste
     basket by now). Again waste of time and money.
     
        -Or they will be working for preparing election manifesto
     for the next election by using tax payer's money.
     
        - If it is very important and above politics like judiciary
     body then why is it reshuffled immediately after the
     election?
     
        -Provided it is above politics, then all political parties
     should be fighting the elections on the political ground not
     on the economic policies, which is highly unlikely.

     So no matter whether the NPC members are competent or incompetent, but I am the wondering why NPC is there in the first place? To give JAGIR for some party workers or to prepare backgrounds for another election?

Fact: I even don't know the definition of planning and have never taken any courses on economics. So please educate me.

-ganesh

          Ganesh R Pandey, McGill University, Montreal, Canada
          tel: (514) 8429057 (h), (514) 398 6871 (o)
          
********************************************************** From: ponta@sas.upenn.edu (Pratyoush R. Onta) Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - Jan 5, 1995 (21 Push 2051 BkSm) To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Date: Fri, 6 Jan 1995 20:03:37 -0500 (EST)

Published in The Kathmandu Post of 30 October 1994. Pratyoush

Vikas and Imperialist Nostalgia

By Lazima Onta & Pratyoush Onta

When asked about Nepal being often described as the Switzerland of Asia, Toni Hagen once said "It [Nepal] is a wonderful country. It is in fact more wonderful than Switzerland if you take into account the Nepali people. The people here are open-minded. They are always smiling. This is what the Swiss people have already lost. That is why Nepal is such a fascinating country for us. What we have lost you still have. My main concern is that with the opening of development aid in the region the Nepali people may lose their identity. This is the real danger. You can solve ecological problems. No amount of money can buy back the Nepali identity and culture" (The Independent , 25 November 1992). Hagen, who we know only through his writings, suffers from what the Stanford anthropologist Renato Rosaldo has described as "Imperialist Nostalgia" in his book Culture and Truth: The Remaking of Social Analysis (1989).

Imperialist nostalgia, as Rosaldo defines it, is "a particular kind of nostalgia, often found under imperialism, where people mourn the passing of what they themselves have transformed." In other words, agents of change, colonial and post-colonial, desire for the very forms of life they have altered or destroyed intentionally. Rosaldo analyzes the works of colonial military-administrators, missionaries and anthropologists like himself and his wife, the late Michelle Rosaldo, in the Philippines for evidence of imperialist nostalgia. The work of development consultants like Toni Hagen are not included in Rosaldo's analysis, but undoubtedly some members of this tribe provide the subject par excellence for studies looking for evidence of imperialist nostalgia today. Just take Hagen's example.

Hagen's credentials as an agent of development in Nepal are well known and need not be repeated here in their entirety. Over forty years ago, he first came here as a member of the Swiss Mission for Development Aid. While in Nepal, he did, among other things, extensive geological and aerial surveys. Later he was responsible for starting Nepal's carpet industry as part of the Tibetan refugee settlement program. His interventions as an agent of development, we would suppose, were made with the belief that life in Nepal could be improved through them. Without belittling his contributions to that end, it should be pointed out however that they must have been carried out in a rush with lack of self-reflectivity regarding the nature of changes he was helping to bring.

That development means change, and that although positive changes are hoped, it cannot be assured is a fact that nobody will quarrel with today. That development efforts in Nepal have already greatly affected "Nepali culture," both positively and negatively, is a fact that Hagen does not seem to be aware when he is warning us about the impending danger of our losing our "identity and culture." To say that his development efforts have not yet affected "Nepali culture" P pay some attention to the discussion about the carpet industry in Nepal today P is to make an untenable observation.

Moreover, for Hagen, our present "open-minded" and "always smiling" selves P is the Swiss past that no longer exists. By constructing such a time-line, Hagen compounds his imperialist nostalgia with an evolutionary language that made the modernisation paradigm so attractive not too long ago. Our development, that paradigm told us, was going to give us the living standards of the industrial West. We just had to be patient before we would "take off" to those standards. The ruins of that thought lay strewn over our and many others' landscapes all over the world. In truth, we are neither open-minded nor always smiling. The rigidities of our caste and partially feudal society hardly qualify us for these appellations. Our present is nobody's past. Nor is our future anybody's present. Swiss folks and us co-live in this world in the present.

Defunct Notion of Culture: One reason Hagen suffers from compounded imperialist nostalgia, we would like to suggest, is because of his adherence to a notion of culture that cannot be supported under close scrutiny. The notion that culture is static, something bounded, or only to be found amongst people "without history" has been discredited among certain brands of anthropologists who, because of historical connections, have had an academic monopoly over the word. That culture somehow only resides in life-cycle ceremonies, masked dances, and festivals, is a notion that is now difficult to support. The anthropology that propped up this increasingly defunct notion of culture largely legitimised itself, as Johannnes Fabian has argued vigorously in his book Time and the Other
(1983), by denying coevalness to its subjects of study.

This means that the people being studied were always thought to be existing in a time other than and prior to that in which the researcher lived much like Hagen's time-line discussed above. The more illiterate, the more rural, the more untounced by "modernity", the better was the primitive subject of anthropology. Primitive culture was sometimes thought to be what 'natives' deserved to have in the lower rungs of the evolutionary ladder, or at other times to reside in the functions that their social arrrangements performed to keep their primitiveness together. At other times culture was thought to be all in the native's head as postulated by an entire generation of cognitive anthropologists in the 1950s and the 1960s. Meandering through the thick descriptions of intrepretive anthropology and several variants of "pratice" theories and surviving the orgy of self-reflectivity that marked the "crisis" of anthropology in the 1980s (at least in the US), culture is now thought to be a hard-to-define, unbounded, variously localized, power-laden process.

When used in this sense, it becomes impossible to talk about "Nepali Culture" as if it has remained as yet unaffected by millions of development money that has poured into Nepal for the last 40 years. Moreover, if simplistic representations of Nepal and Nepalis are to be abandoned, we are not even sure what something like "Nepali culture" would consist of. Hagen says that "Nepali people might lose their identity" as if identity was a "thing" that was outside of and unaffected by time and politics. Identity is more fluid than he and others like him would grant us, although we recognise that it is not infinitely plastic. Supine prajas whose obeisance was described in mythical terms until yesterday can now call themselves sovereign. And if words like culture and identity are to make any sense, then people who use them better learn ways to encompass their fluidity.
 

Hagen helped bring change into Nepal even as he may wish that "Nepali identity and culture" remain unchanged. As Nepal now reels under the stress of change, Hagen feels that the destruction of this Nepali identity is his "main concern." Rosaldo wrote: "Imperialist nostalgia occurs alongside a peculiar sense of mission, 'the white man's burden,' where civilized nations stand duty-bound to uplift so-called savage ones....When the so-called civilizing process destablishes forms of life, the agents of change experience transformations of other cultures as if they were personal losses." Hagen, an agent of change, is now experiencing transformations in Nepal as a personal loss.

One might say that that is expected from someone who in the blurp to his 1961 book, Nepal, was described as someone who "can claim to know Nepal better than any other foreigner." There it is stated that behind the man who has travelled thousands of miles in Nepal " lie concealed such fatigue and privations as only few explorers have experienced." But if this is so then we say that it does not suit a man like Hagen to continue to mouth words like culture, identity, "open-minded" and "always smiling" when talking about Nepal and Nepalis. We expect him to do better.

By no means do we want to suggest that only foreign consultants like Hagen suffer from imperialist nostalgia and its above-explained link with denial of coevalness to Nepal and Nepalis. Hagen has lots of company, not only amongst foreign consultants but also among his Nepali counterparts who have now claimed "Nepali culture" as their subject of expertise. However, in most of the cases, their training as social scientists does not prepare them for suggesting remedial prescriptions required for interventionist vikas work. But this is a subject that deserves separate scrunity.

*********************************************************************** Date: 6 Jan 95 17:03 -0800 From: Anil Tuladhar <tuladhar@ppc.ubc.ca> To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Poem "Still Not Found"

           STILL NOT FOUND

Eyes see scene,
        Ears hear sound. Who is behind them,
        Still not found.

Heart a fleshy lump
        Acting as a pump. Throbs incessently
        Sending blood around. Who is monitoring it
        Still not found.

No wonder brain is there
        An organic computer. Doing all calulations while
        Weighing just a pound. Who is operating it,
        Still not found.

Every system with proper provisions
        Every organ with proper labour division. Nay whole design is prone to age
        And decay bound. Who is that failing engineer,
        Still not found.

-ANIL

*********************************************************************** Date: Sat, 7 Jan 1995 22:33:37 +0900 From: Gyaneswor Pokharel <g44329a@nucc.cc.nagoya-u.ac.jp> To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu

Ashu wrote ?
>>>I would rather have a rigorously trained (in ANY
>>>discipline, including mathematics or history!)intelligent GENERALIST who
>>>shows these three qualities...
>>
Then, Belbase wrote!

>>I definitely agree with you there. Certainly "experts" who have been
>>doing narrow research for years would be better in universities. However,
        =============================================================
>>experts who have a multi or interdisciplinary education and work experience
B ################################### B >>(preferable lots of it) would, I think, be great. B >> My comment:
==========
        Before,Belbase ji make further comment on experts...., I want to raise objections regarding his comment on the aforementioned statements.

As the world is moving from 20th century to 21st century, you can see many new disciplines have emerged or divided/separted from mother discipline, whether it is your maths or my civil engineering branch. In the first half of this century, the civil , mechanical or electrical engineering were distinguished only after the completion of second year studies. Now it has almost come to a stage that you may not be allowed to switch just after you complete first year course, because the discipline has become such a vast that the rest three year is not enough to study even the basic of civil engineering and most of the universities just outline today what is basic philosophy in civil engineering and they give the rest responsibility to the organisation/company where the graduate will work. The company usually train these fresh employees according to their demand and they become very specialized in their field, rather than confusing with vast knowledge, which is sometimes called as "jack of all - master of none". Then, some of those students who completed undergraduate enter into the Masters level where usually 30 hour credit is expected to complete within one year. In these 30 credit you can usually take 10-12 subjects, thus within these 10 subjects if you go for really multidisciplinary subjects from history to mathematics then I wonder what the student can learn and I will raise why should the student be given Masters degree in the particular subject because he hardly knows the subject matter of his discipline. Fruthermore, most of the universities offer one year research program in second year of Masters degree which should be considered by the student the year allocated to understand the ways to tackle problems related to his discipline, rather than calling him-self expert of that narrow Masters thesis topic. If you really do independent research as Masters thesis, you can tackle all most all the problems related to your Masters level studeis and also can identify the solutions to Many problems
(provided you have enough time) relevent to your undergraduate discipline, too. Therfore, my conclusion is that research you do at universities is aimed to teach you how to tackle problems rather than confining yourself the Master of your thesis title. Once, you succeed conducting research studies you are supposed to handle most of the problem encountered as practicing man " professional".

        Eventhough I hear multi-disciplinary courses offered in many universities, do you really think they are really multi-disciplinary ? My understanding is that they are multi-disciplinary within the framwork of mother discipline.

        You said Research works in the univesity only. This is not correct. The usefullness of a research depends on what level of research you conduct. If your research is realted to a topic of industrial demand, which is called a basic research, then the research output is instantly implemented by the industry or the public. Otherwise, the research will be published in a journal and piled in library for years and if worth someone in next century may dig it out, other I call it just a production of #PAPER# good for recycling in developed countries and for packing
#chana chat-pat# in Nepal, nothing else. Therefore, those who do the research what public/industry demands can work everywhere and need not be confined in the university. Only thing is you should be practical researcher rather than theoretician talking about millions of light year away galaxy.

Eknath ji, I will put one joke and I express my sincere applogies because there is one character who is also mathmatecian. This joke is not meant to hurt you.

" many of us have heard of the following joke, I also heard this in my school days where I used to mean in different way than I mean here : (It was also told by one very famous Professor as well as vetran professional practicing engineer in an international conference of my field).

        Somewhere, one beautifull girl wanted to get marry. So, she posted a wanted notice and based on her requirements two candidates were screened for final selection. Then, she proposed one last question, when she asked them to stand 5m away on right and left sides. Then, she said O.K> gentlemen, you are allowed to jump once only half of the distance between you and me. Out of these two candidates one was professional engineer and the other was excellent pure-mathematician. Both had good knowledge of mathmatics.

Just after the whistle they started jumping, and approaching her. Within 6th jump the professional engineer touched whereas the pure mathematician was still calculating the 5/2, 5/4, 5/8... and so on. The girl announced that she is going to marry with the engineer. When asked to engineer why did you touched her when the distance was still about 15cm, then he said in his calculation compared to 5m the 15 cm was tolerance (3%), so he thought it is enough.

The girl's reply was that she was searching a practical man who works according to situation and importance of the objective, thats why the engineer was more practical , so was her selection.

In layman's concept she married with the engineer because he earns money in Nepal more than usual mathematics teacher.

Therefore, we should do research practical and situational which is acceptable in practice as well as in university teaching.

Thanks.

Gyaneswor Pokharel

P.S. Happy new year to all TND staff and readers.

******************************************************************* From: Ashutosh Tiwari <tiwari@husc.harvard.edu> Subject: Mid-Night Thoughts While Listening to Bacchu Kailash To: Nepal Digest <nepal@cs.niu.edu>
                                
        What follows is very long; if you do not have the time, please skip this, but, if interested, please read later at your leisure. Thank you. ashu
                                
        Previous [personal] letter from Ganesh Pandey, a long post by Padam Sharma, and a recent post by Amulya Tuladhar have convinced me that my views on 'what makes a leader', either in Nepal in general and the NPC in specific, have been seriously misinterpreted to serve a rather NARROW set of criteria.

        Perhaps I had not made my points clearly: Let me make another attempt.

        1) WESTERN EDUCATION: I was surprised that almost all commentators, on both TND and SCN, seemed to assume, rather automatically, that I was talking about western educational degrees as some sort of prerequisites to being [political or other kinds of] leaders in Nepal. I WAS NOT! Nowhere in my various posts have I mentioned that a western education works wonders to be a political or other kinds of leaders/ministers and so on in Nepal.

        Nepalis of any ethnicity, educated anywhere, either formally or informally, can become leaders -- especially in things away from politics
-- if only they demonstrate and continue on with both the commitment and the dedication to their chosen public or private causes. [Dilli Choudhary is not that educated by the standards of almost all TND readers; but he's doing much more amazing and influential work! And I'm sure that there are other such leaders, of all ethnic groups, in all regions, quietly bringing about positive changes in their communities.]

        2) QUALIFICATION OF MINISTERS: I understand that both political and personal considerations on the part of the prime minister -- regardless of the Party s/he represents -- do play a big role in who becomes ministers and so forth. But I believe that being a Nepali State Minister SHOULD not be a cushy reward for party karya-kartas on the mere basis of their seniority, number of years served in jail, their personal suffering and other highly subjective criteria.

        To be sure, their seniority, years spent in jail and suffering under the Panchayat should be honored and publicly respected; but those 'points' must not be the OVERWHELMINGLY DOMINANT criteria for any new prime minister to choose his ministers. A minister, after all, is there to serve the entire nation. And that is why, in a little more ideal Nepal, the
"baggage of qualifications" -- consisting of education, professional training, experience, competence, sensitivity, integrity and so forth -- that a person -- of any party -- is likely to bring to meet the
"challenges facing the country" would be given more serious considerations.
[I am aware, however, that this is also a set of subjective criteria; yet, I would argue that these represent at least a BETTER or at least more publicly palatable degree of subjectivity than the previous set.]

        As a citizen of Nepal, I am heartened, however, by two recent acts of the UML government: A) Their decision to make the wealth-figure of the ministers public; and B) Their decision to fill in the general manager-ship of various corporations by publicly soliciting resumes.
        
        [Of course, with regard to B), I would have been even happier had the government gone ahead with the gradual privatization of those corporations so that the shareholders themselves could hire and fire their OWN managers. That would at least free the government to be the umpire to make and enforce relevant [business] laws so that LEGALLY FAIR processes of business could prevail.]

        3) NPC: In his last post on TND, Amulya called for an ethnically diverse NPC. I agree with Amulya's conclusion, but NOT with his reasoning. Here's why:

        First, Amulya wonders how come there are no other Nepali "experts" beyond the usual representation of bahun-chettri-newar (in that order!).

        [Aside: this is reminiscent of the 'fights' going on in the American academy to hire and tenure Black faculty members: The argument there being, with 11 percent of Americans being Blacks, how come there are not enough Black professors at the universities? A good, sincere question, but a depressing one -- when you consider that the number of Black scholars with PhDs is disproportionately so low that most American universities are simply reduced to the game of chasing the same handful of Black scholars from coast to coast. But the over-arching remedy here is not to hire Black professors indiscriminately just to increase their number on campus but to do two things: First, continue to recruit aggressively; and, second, more importantly, do everything possible to attract, support, nurture and encourage more and more Black students to consider careers in the academia. The latter, I believe, is lot more important for the FUTURE of the American academy if diversity is to continue to be cherished, respected and celebrated.]

        In Nepal, ethnic diversity should matter and should be celebrated and respected publicly through all media of communication. I agree with Amulya, Dor Bahadur Bista notwithstanding, that for too long only a few select groups of bahun-chettri-and-Kathmandu ka newars have dominated the socio-political structure in Nepal [read: Kathmandu].

        I agree too that the state must take the marginalization of various communities into consideration when making decisions regarding public health, education and so forth. Indeed, how to bring the usually neglected jana-jatis and the tarai-basi into the center of "development activities" should be the concern of any Nepali government -- though, quite frankly, my knowledge and experience are too inadequate to suggest exactly HOW.

        [However, I do think that the American-style Affirmative Action would be harder to work with in Nepal, where just about everybody seems to be some sort of an ethnic minority. For example, Newars, on the strength of their number, would certainly count as even 'smaller' minorities than, say, the Bhojpuris. Yet, despite their smaller percentage-of-the-population, no one can deny that Newars, as a group, have done visibly much better (that is, in education, business, industries and so on) than the collective visible gains of the Bhojpuris. Now, how would the American-style affirmative action -- which, in theory, should be fair to ALL minorities -- take such extant differences into account? Aside: What do other Nepalis think? What do former Peace Corps volunteers think about this?]

        Having said all that, let me argue -- if on the contrary -- that Amulyas's implied reasoning for an ethnically diverse NPC is flawed. I think it would be a disaster to hand out an NPC post to, say, Mr. Nar Bahadur Tamang, PhD (a fictitious name) just because he's a Tamang or to hand another NPC portfolio to Mrs. Shyama Lawati (another fictitious name) just because she's a woman. To hire Mr Tamang and Mrs. Lawati SOLELY on the basis of their ethnicity and gender is to INSULT both the Tamangs and the women, and to pander to the potentially divisive idea of ethnic and gender tokenism.

        Sure, I agree that ethnicity and gender should matter, and that people who had historically been denied access to 'higher' opportunities should be given chances -- BUT ONLY AND ONLY WHEN ALL ELSE IS EQUAL. In other words, the hiring criteria for Mr. Tamang should be that he's a professionally respected expert (of whatever that's relevant to NPC) first; NOT that he's an educated Tamang and that that's the ONLY criterion to get into NPC! Still, in other words, to be hired in NPC or any other organizations, being an educated Tamang should be the feather in Mr. Tamang's cap -- not the cap itself! [Remember, Dr. Harka Bdr. Gurung? Isn't it safe to say that regardless of his ethnicity, Gurung is the most-respected-professionally geographer of his generation in Nepal? And that we can say that . .. isn't that wonderful?]

        Otherwise, by using Amulys's 'ethnic criteria' to choose NPC members, I fear that in an ethnically diverse nation-state like ours, there is great potential for misuse and abuse of the "ethnic-card". [Here, I wonder how relevant a discussion of India's Mandal Commission would be . . .!]

        Of course, the best way to train Nepal's future policy-makers is to spend more money on and make the quality of instruction better at Nepal's hundreds of public schools -- from those in Fikkal, Ilam to those in Dadheldhura -- that have unfortunately been NOT able to train ALL students of all backgrounds and ethnicities everywhere to be active, participating citizens! [Another argument against BKS!].

        4) Finally, a few words on Amulyas's quibble regarding the economics departments at Harvard [and LSE] and his implication that what they teach is NOT relevant to most Nepalis:
        
        To that all I can generally say is this: Sure, I may not have learnt many 'relevant-to-Nepal' things at my university, but I've surely learnt to think much better and more clearly (at least, in moments of desperation, that's what I would like to believe!) than when I first arrived here. I am sure that most of you feel the same way about your universities either in the US or elsewhere.

        And now that I've been taught to think a little more sharply, I, as a citizen of Nepal, like many of you, cannot stop attempting to apply my parts of my academic training to think more clearly and in detail about the problems, the challenges, the opportunities and the successes facing Nepal -- the place where I sincerely hope to establish a career (after first paying back my depressingly large amount of educational loans, that is! :-). Still, if education in the United States or elsewhere prepares many of you and me to make a meaningful contribution to Nepal -- either from abroad or by physically being in Nepal
-- in whatever way to your tole, community, jilla, gaun or chosen profession, then I would say that that in and of itself IS RELEVANT TO ALL NEPALIS, regardless of whether you study economics or history or philosophy or mathematics or computer science or engineering!

        Enough said. What do others think? See you at the end of Januray. Bacchu Kailash has reached the end of the tape . . .

namaste ashu
         
******************************************************************* Date: Sun, 08 Jan 1995 16:01:13 -0500 (EST) From: Shirish <RANJITS@WABASH.EDU> Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - Jan 6,
 1995 (22 Push 2051 BkSm)Ethnic Bias in NPC

I against these types of separatist ideas. We have to select the commission on the basis of academic excellence because this commission is responsible for bulding our country. Hey we are all Nepalese and our main interest is to make the country better not worse by separating ourselves in different groups. We have to be loyal to our country and its development. We should spend our energy in up bringing all the people's life. So why argue in how the NPC should compose. We should select those who are able to bring some change not the bullshitters.

Anyway, make peace and be one, lets not divide ourselves. We have to be strong by being together.

************************************************************************* Date: Sun, 8 Jan 1995 17:07:04 -0500 From: rajendra@coos.dartmouth.edu (Rajendra P. Shrestha) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Deputy PM to visit India in February

Deputy PM to visit India soon

Excerpts from AFP, UPI and Xinhua reports

   The Nepalese Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Madhav Kumar Nepal will visit India next month to pave the way for a visit by Prime Minister Manmohan Adhikari. In an interview with the official Rising Nepal, Mr. Nepal said, "Although there has not been a formal invitation from india for my visit, it has been thought that the visit will take place in the first week of february and talks are going on for the visit." "We are still in a process of preparation and issues to be taken up in New Delhi are yet to be finalized," he said.

   The Nepalese premier is due in India in March at the invitation of Indian Prime Minister Narasimha Rao. It will be his first foreign visit after taking office as Nepal's first communist prime minister in November.

   Trade, an open border, Bhutanese refugees and the Tanakpur accord with India will be some of the issues to be discussed, the newspaper quoted the minister as saying. In the interview, Nepal said that the 1040-kilometre (650-mile) frontier should be regulated to check smuggling and illegal immigration from India.

   He also said that Nepal will seek Indian and international support to send home more than 100,000 Bhutanese refugees living in camps in East Nepal. In the interview, the minister said that ''Bhutan should take back its people with honor and dignity because Nepal could not continue to bear the heavy burden of the refugees. ''For this, we expect good understanding from the Bhutanese government and seek cooperation and support from India and the international community.'' Nepal's previous government, run by the Nepali Congress party that was defeated in November's election, attempted unsuccessfully to resolve the refugee crisis through bilateral negotiations with Bhutan.

  The minister also said that the thorny issue of the Tanakpur dam treaty would also be on the agenda. The two countries signed an agreement in 1991 whereby Nepal would receive free electricity and water from the India-based hydro-electric facility in exchange for land in Nepal used by the project. But the treaty still needs to be ratified by the Nepalese parliament. In the interview, Mr. Nepal said that the new government would seek "corrections" to the Tanakpur River accord. ''Prior to the ratification by Parliament, the Tanakpur accord needs some corrections,'' he said. The communists, when they were the opposition, accused the Nepali Congress party of selling Nepalese interests in the multi-purpose river project on the common river border with India. ''Without a good understanding between the leaders of the two countries, the Tanakpur problem cannot be sorted out easily.''

More than 50,000 Children Labourers in Kathmandu

   A study by the Child Welfare Centre in Kathmandu has reported that there are more than 50,000 children below the age of 14 working as labourers in Kathmandu, writes the daily Kantipur. Of these 9,500 are working as domestic helpers. Some 20 percent of the children serving as domestic servants said they had been sexually abused by their employers.

   Some 6,000 children are employed in restaurants, most of them working more than 13 hours daily. Another 8,000 are working in garment and carpet industries, the report says. Apart from this, 5,000 others are involved in prostitution, about 25,000 are homeless and there are nearly 300 street children in Kathmandu Valley. The average age of girl children in prostitution is from 11 to 17, the report says. According to the report, More than 70 percent of the child labourers are illiterate.

   Meanwhile, the government has postponed the issuing of "child labour free" certificates to Nepalese carpet manufacturers for unspecified reasons. The "child labour free" certificate was originally due to come into force over two weeks ago. (DPA, Xinhua)

Government Asks World Bank to Postpone Meeting on Arun Project

   The Nepali government has asked the World Bank to postpone its January 9 meeting scheduled to decide the fate of the Arun-III hydro project. In a letter to the Bank, the Nepalese government is seeking a three week delay to explore avenues of cutting down the cost of the project and easing some of the Bank's conditionalities.

   Water resources state minister Hari Pandey, speaking to Xinhua, said, "if the road to the project area is constructed by nepalese instead of foreigners, the country would save 3.6 billion rupees
(73.46 million us dollars) for the 800 million us dollars project." Asked about if the world bank would be willing to ease the "harsh" conditionalities, Pandey said, "we should not blame the world bank because these conditionalities were imposed as the previous governments could not keep financial discipline nor guarantee proper use of the loans."

   The world bank's conditionalities on the Arun Project include:
-- only those experts deputized by the bank should be employed on the
   project,
-- the power tariffs in nepal should be increased 85 percent
   till 1999,
-- the government should accept the terms put forward by the
   multinational corporations with regard to small economic structures,
-- the government should not undertake small and big economic
   construction projects without getting the permission of the world
   bank.

Supreme Court Reinstates Fired Workers

Excerpts from UPI report

   Two special benches of the Supreme Court has ordered the reinstatement of 39 civil servants forced into retirement by the previous administration. The court said the decision of the previous government under the Nepali Congress party, which had forcibly retired 2,000 workers to streamline the administration was illegal. The supreme court also rejected the petition by the previous administration to review the court's decision to reinstate 26 employees it had ordered rehired. The previous administration's decision to push employees into retiring was immediately questioned when it rehired 11 people as secretaries in various ministries on a contract basis.

Custom Officials Intercept Money

Excerpts from UPI report

   Customs officials at Katmandu International Airport have recovered more than $500,000 in cash and traveler's checks from a Danish national and a toilet on an aircraft about to take off for Hong Kong. Customs officials found more than $360,000 in cash and $28,000 in traveler's checks in the toilet while searching the Royal Nepal Airlines plane shortly before it was to take off for Hong Kong. Police found another $100,000 in cash and $25,000 in traveler's checks on a Danish national who was going to Hong Kong on the same aircraft. The money was hidden in bandages around the Dane's legs, airport officials said. The Dane was arrested for questioning, authorities said.

King Accepts Resignations of five Ambassadors

Excerpts from UPI and Reuters reports

   King Birendra has accepted the resignations of five ambassadors, officials said Saturday. An official statement issued on Saturday said King Birendra had accepted the resignations of ambassadors Bharat Prasad Dhital (Tokyo), Basudev Chandra Malla (Beijing), Gopal Prasad Sharma (Bonn), Thakkan Malik (Rangoon), and Jaya Raj Acharya, Nepal's permanent representative to the United Nations. All five were appointed by former prime minister Girija Prasad Koirala, whose party was defeated in recent elections.

   Sources in the Nepalese foreign ministry, seeking anonymity, said however that all five were asked to step down after the Communist Party of Nepal -Unified Marxist-Leninist (UML) formed the minority government in November 1994.

    Nepal has not appointed any ambassador to Washington after Yog Prasad Upadhyaya was recalled in 1993 following differences between him and Koirala.

   The communist government will also have to appoint a new ambassador to New Delhi, a post which is lying vacant after Chakra Prasad Bastola resigned to be elected to the Nepalese parliament.

   The new government has appointed Basudev Dhungana, a former minister and a lawyer as ambassador to China, while Narendra Bikram Shah, a former diplomat will head the Nepali mission to the United Nations, foreign ministry sources said.

**************************************************************** Date: Mon, 09 Jan 95 08:42:44 EST From: "Thapa, Khagendra" <KTHAPA@MUSIC.FERRIS.EDU> To: <nepal@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Looking for my friend

I am looking for my friend Bimal Keshary Poudel. He used to teach in Forestry Institute in Hetauda. I was told he is somewhere in Malaysia now. I wonder if anybody knows where he is now. I would really appreciate it if you could send me his internet address (if available). I have been working at Ferris State University for the last seven years.

Dr. Khagendra Thapa Professor, Surveying Engineering Big Rapids, Michigan.

%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%% %%
%% END OF "THE NEPAL DIGEST". %%
%% %%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



This archive was generated by hypermail 2b29 : Tue Jan 11 2000 - 11:15:35 CST