The Nepal Digest - February 4, 1997 (30 Magh 2053 BkSm)

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Date: Mon Feb 03 1997 - 17:24:21 CST


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The Nepal Digest Tuesday 4 Feb 97: Magh 30 2053BS: Year6 Volume59 Issue 1

Today's Topics:

                 Anuradha Shelter
                 Hydro Forum Proposed for ANA convention
                 Reminder about Lord Buddha
                 TAJA_KHABAR: Current News
                 Book Reviews from the Kathmandu Post
                 Fate of the girlchild : life a curse?
 
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****************************************************************** Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 16:22:18 +0100 To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: iannone <iannone.cyb@vdp.fr> Subject: Anuradha Shelter

Dear Sir / Madame,
        I recently saw a documentary by the Canadian Filmbroadcasting Corporation dealing with the subject of child prostitution and the number of Nepalese children working in the brothels of Bombey in particular.
        Some footage was devoted to the work of a woman who runs a shelter for young girs at 'high risk'. I believe the name is the Anradhu Shelter. I would greatly appreciate if you could communicate the exact address of the Shelter, because I would like to contact the womam in charge. I thank you in advance for any information you can give me.
                                                Yours sincerely,
                                                Robert IANNONE

****************************************************************** To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Hydro Forum Proposed for ANA convention Date: Fri, 24 Jan 97 18:36:48 EST From: rshresth@bbn.com (Rajesh B. Shrestha)

The forum for hydro power development in Nepal being planned in Boston is an interesting one. The real challenge for the forum, I think, is not merely to talk about hydro power situation in Nepal but to also hear out and have a genuine exchange of dialogues. Despite the fact that there has been tremendous discussion on hydro power in Nepal, what we have chronically lacked is a genuine exchange of views between the people in key positions, enough to make any difference. Specifically, there is a huge gulf of information and even attitudes between the ones with authority, namely the government; the ones with money, i.e. the World Bank (and other donors) and the ones with arguments, the critical NGOs?

Can this forum bring together representatives from these disparate walks face-to-face in a cordial atmosphere, as it promises to do? That is the challenge. If the forum can provide substance for each of these participants to take back to their professions, that would be a real achievement indeed.

Say what? Rajesh

bikash@aol.com (Bikash) writes:
>In response to Shree Krishna Pandey's survey on the hydropower forum being
>proposed for the ANA convention in July, I think that the topic is
>extremely pertinent to and well-timed. As many of us are aware of, Enron
>has recently intimated HMG/N on its interest in investing altogether US$9
>BILLION in constructing Karnali (and exporting power to China across the
>Himalayas) and the World Bank's rejected Arun 3 projects. Recently,
>treaties on multibillion dollar water projects like Mahakali and Detailed
>Project Report (DPR) agreement for Koshi high dam with India have been
>signed. Construction on Kali Gandaki A (140 MW by NEA) and Khimti (60MWby
>HPL--a private sector initiative).

>I would be interested to know who are the experts being invited and what
>specific issues are being planned to be addressed.

>Bikash

************************************************************ Date: Sat, 25 Jan 1997 13:24:45 +0700 (GMT+0700) From: "H. K. Pradhan" <hsp57194@ait.ac.th> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Reminder about Lord Buddha

Dear Editor I had mailed my following arguments about Lord Buddha which was not published in today's TND. I guess you did not receive it or there were technical difficulties. Therefore I have agained mailed for you consideration. Hari Pradhan

Dear Editor

We thank to the TND and others who responded on the issue "Birth Place of Lord Buddha". But regarding views put forwarded by the learned readers, we have little different idea. In fact we did not take the matter far away. The information itself is far away from accuracy which forced us to write on the matter. I would like to put forward the following arguments (I was one of them who raised the issue).

I do not disagree Mr. Rudolf Guthier 's view that before 2540 years Nepal was not as it is today. But then we must also accept the fact that neither India was then as it is today. She was officially formed in 1940s while the matter we are discussing took place more than 2500 years ago. If we discuss things in such ways then perhaps many important global property does not belong to the countries/people enjoying them today. Some others deserve them. For instance, USA should belong to Red Indians only. Russia should immediately free Chechnia. Tibet should belong to Tibetans. Many parts of India should belong to Mugals (Muslims). Israel should be immediately evacuated and so on and so forth. How some one would feel if the same dictionary writes "Mississippi flows from the north of South America or Taj Mahal was constructed by a Muslim Empire which is in the east of Pakistan without mentioning USA or India". My point is that why such important book still publishes such inaccurate information. Why can not it write at least like it has done in the case of Christ and Christianity?

I also do not much disagree with Mr. Rabi's view that the dictionary does not give the impression that Lord Buddha was born in India. But then I have some questions too. By simply reading it, will everybody understand that he was born in Nepal which is reality? Will not such information influence any reader to assume that he must have born in India?

But there are additional reasons which stimulated to forward the issue.

I would not have been much bothered if the dictionary had not mentioned name of India. I worry if corrections are not made, even the people of the 21st century will get inaccurate information through a globally renowned publication.

Perhaps Mr. Rabi would not differ with us if he were in Thailand and realized that except exception many Thai people take that Lord Buddha is from India (Lets not forget that there is difference between uninformed and misinformed). Even very highly educated people do not know/accept this truth. When one argues for the reality, these people turn the pages of dictionary and the offender does not have any way out for supporting his arguments. Then one can guess the consequences of inaccurate information.

With such information and circumstances which people will think the birth place of Lord Buddha, Nepal or India? Being a student of tourism, I could not stand this inaccurate information which have been fueled by such circumstances. In one way this have also been fueled by ourselves
(Nepalese nationals) as we simply accept such propaganda.

More over, at Asian Institute of Technology, a living place of more than 40 countries where while introducing own nationality both Nepal and India claim that he bolongs to them. One can guess how the audience will be easily confused.

Therefore, we again request everyone to seek ways to reach the publisher so that people will get the accurate information.

As a responsible stakeholder of the matter, lets help people searching particulars of Lord Buddha and help them know that Lord Buddha is from Nepal and belongs to Nepal.

Thank you for patience given to read our view.

Hari Kumar Pradhan School of Environment, Resources and Development Asian Institute of Technology Bangkok, Thailand

**************************************************************** Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 01:07:10 -0500 (EST) From: JJoshee@aol.com To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Ambassador Thapa's Speech and atuladhar's Reaction

Dear Editor,

This is in response to atuladhar's reaction published in TND's last issue regarding Ambassador Thapa's speech at the University of Connecticut. I felt personally responsible to respond (although I am not representing anyone nor defending the Ambassador), to some of the comments made by Mr. atuladhar, because I was one of the sponsor of Dr. Thapa's visit at UConn and also to the fact that I made the intial posting of that speech.

First of all, let me make it very clear that Ambassador Thapa was not compensated for his speech. He never asked to be paid for his talk, period. The sponsors did pick up the expenses of the program but no personal compensation to the Ambassador.

To the question of whether Nepal benifited from those sponsors and the speech
- it truely depends on how one interprets these kinds of activity. In my viewpoint, the event raised awareness about Nepal, it exposed the audience about several issues that we are facing as a nation and as southasia region. It was a candid speech given by the Ambassador followed by a healthy discussion. The program was attended by students, faculty, staff and the community. I certainly felt good to have the Ambassador come to UConn and talk about Nepal. Therefore, I personally think that the event was worthwhile.

Mr. Atuladhar made several other comments about the content of the Ambassador's speech which I am not going to argue with. However, my own comments are that Dr. Thapa did not claim that Panchayat was a democracy. My understanding of his term of "quasi democracy" was in reference to the limited election and people involvement during Panchayat time. Yes, he was a Minister in that era, so are many of the most powerful Ministers in the current government in Nepal. But I am not sure how relevant it is in today's context to hound on the Panchayat talk. You know, I know, everyone knows, and I am sure Ambassador Thapa knows that Panchayat is a "dead goat". In no way Panchayat was a democracy, and honestly, I am not sure what democracy we have in Nepal today. As a matter of fact, I think this is the kind of argumentative, dirty, political no brainer talk that is disserving our country. How will Nepal benefit today by kicking around the already dead animal Panchayat? What harmony are we going to achieve today by talking about ancient hindus dehumanizing non-hindus? Haven't we travelled far from the ram rajya? How and what Nepal gains from the political infighting? Panchayat was so bad with "ghoos khori and chakari" - is it really any different now with the so called democracy? Whats good whats bad - that is today's question.

Ambassador Thapa's "ram rajya" reference while he was talking about ancient democratic connections in southasia had nothing to do with hindus dehumanizing non-hindus. I am a nonpracticing hindu by birth and I know I do not dehumanize non-hindus or any other human race. In his speech, the Panchayat and the ram rajya was nothing but a one liner reference. Therefore, my point is to not get hooked with this kind of non productive arguments. Rather, I would ask our ambassadors, ministers, and other leaders what they are doing for the country's economic growth, and for the well being of Nepali people.

I thank Mr. Tuladhar for his comments. Hope others will engage.

Dr. J. Joshee Connecticut

**************************************************************** Date: Sun, 26 Jan 97 07:21:05 UT From: "Barbara Pijan" <b_pijan@msn.com> To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu Subject: TAJA_KHABAR: Current News

TAJA_KHABAR: Current News

Dear TND Editor, Please post this Losar 1997 announcement if you have space. Thank you. Sincerely, Sherpa Friendship Association USA 1213 Kains Avenue, Berkeley CA 94706 tel/fax 1-510-526-5674 email: b_pijan@msn.com

The Sherpa Friendship Association welcomes you to celebrate Sherpa Losar in the Year of the Fire Ox, 1997 (Tibetan year 2124.)

Saturday, Feb 15, 1997 Albany Community Center in Albany, CA 5:30 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Lama Puja for Your New Year Blessings Sherpa & Nepali Dinner, beverages & snacks Sherpa Song & Dance Performance
$20 at the door - kids under 12 are free! Plenty of parking! tel/fax (510) 526-5674 http://www.bena.com/sherpa1 Please contact Sherpa Friendship Association if you would like to receive an invitation with directions. Tashi delek!

********************************************************************* From: "Punam Panta (punam)" <punam@sequent.com> To: "'NEPAL@MP.CS.NIU.EDU'" <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Looking for Saroj Joshi.... Date: Sun, 26 Jan 97 20:15:00 PST

Hi all,

I am looking for Saroj Joshi of Raktakali, kathmandu who is in the US with his wife Jaya. If Saroj is on the internet and reads this, please email me! If he isn't and someone who knows him reads this mail, please let him know that his cousin Punam is trying to get in touch.

Thanks,

Punam Bhattarai, Sydney, Australia. punam@sequent.com

Punam Panta Product Support Specialist Sequent Computer Systems Australia Pty. Ltd. Tel: (02) 9900 4600 160 Pacific Highway 7319 North Sydney, NSW 2060
                                              Email: punam@sequent.com

************************************************************* Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 21:03:31 -0700 From: nrb957802@rccvax.ait.ac.th (SHYAM SUNDAR SHRESTHA) To: aitns@ait.ac.th, nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Re: Buddha again....

Dear Pahari ji,

Thank you very much for your email posted to aitns on Budhha. This is proved that Indian Diplomates and Indian Beurocrates are really nonsense or hegemonist in their character. They do not know how to behave with their neighbour countries. This is our bad luck that diplomates, beurocrates and rulars of our south neighbour is so nonsense and "Michaha" like an Asan_ko Sandhe. I want to challenge them how they can proof that Lumbini is in Uttar Pradesh of North India. Being a big powerful neighbour they do not suit to write such proofless things. If it so, our Embassy in Bangkok and our Foregn Ministry should protest against such Indian Diplomats, beurocrates and government's attitude on Buddha and many other things which are really against the Nepal and Nepali. I realeally hate such so called "diplomates" and "others" who try to twist Anyway, this writing may be little bit aggressive for them who wants to a slave of Indian. Such attitude of Indian rural, diplomates and beurocrates make India not a great but rude and hegemonist. Therefore, to be a good neighbour, we all have to condemn such nonsense statements which had published anywhere and anybody. This is a living truth that Buddha was born in Nepal, not in India. He is the light of Asia, not the son of India. He belongs to Nepal. Thats all for today. Shyam

************************************************************** Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 21:36:05 -0700 From: nrb957802@rccvax.ait.ac.th (SHYAM SUNDAR SHRESTHA) To: nepal@cs.niu.edu, guthier@mos.com.np, karma@mit.edu Subject: See how Indian so called Diplomats try to make Buddha!

I just read this morning's newspaper The Nation. There is a special supplement on page A9 on the "Republic Day" of India. And the materials are officially given by the Indian Embasssy. On page A9, the whole page contains information about Buddha and his relics. It very clearly implies from reading it that Buddha was born in Uttar Pradesh, India.

I don't know what to say, but such things definitely hurt any Nepali
(except of course some pseudo "Nepali"s which we happen to come acress so often). And it is not my first time to see such things. Having lived in India for four years for my studies...I have experienced much more than this, including many such false propaganda from their official media.

I really don't know what can be done about such things, but I just wanted to post it here to inform others, at a time when the Buddha debate is going on in TND.

Best regards,

Krishna Pahari Space Technology Applications and Research Program Asian Institute of Technology P.O. Box:4, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand Phone: +66-2-524-6109, Fax: +66-2-524-5597 Email: nrc47818@ait.ac.th www: http://www.rsl.ait.ac.th/~pahari

*************************************************************** Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 11:04:02 -0800 To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu From: Immanuel Freedman <anugraha@adnc.com> Subject: Kumar Basnet

Dear Editor,

We would like to prepare a screensaver of Nepali images sold over the internet. Considering background music, one of my friends has a cassette tape labeled
"Kumar Basnet". We would like to clear copyright issues on the use of song(s) from this tape.

Does anyone know where or how to get the necessary copyright permission?

Can anyone find Kumar Basnet? somewhere near Anapurna?

Dr. Immanuel Freedman
     ANUGRAHA 8677 Villa La Jolla Drive, Suite 1119 La Jolla , CA 92037
(619) 492-8915 http://www.anugraha.com/

%%%%%EDITOR'S NOTE: Kumar Basnet's son is a student in Maryland/Virgina %%%%%
%%%%% area. The young man's name, I believe is, Kanchan. %%%%%
%%%%% Would someone around Virgina area pass this %%%%%
%%%%% information to him? %%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

*********************************************************************** To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: The Ultimate Experience! Date: Sun, 26 Jan 97 18:06:50 EST From: rshresth@BBN.COM

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Worked as a volunteer teacher in a government village school in Phedikhola, one hour away from Pokhara. It was a challenging, enriching experience. The beauty and splendour of this place tucked away up on a hill 2,500ft. above sea-level is simply amazing. Most of all, the people(mainly the Gurung tribe) makes the difference in my one-year stay there. I gave a little of my time, energy and skills there as a English teacher. But they gave me so much in return. They gave of their friendship, time, generosity, hospitality, sincerity and simplicity to me. They taught me the joys of simple living(like going fishing and swimming in the rivers in summer), the art of relaxing(going for long walks, climbing mountains, interaction with people) and the beauty of gracious giving(their time and farm produce). Nepal is a place of timeless beauty and serenity. Phedikhola, in particular has given me a hope and purpose in life. There is so much to do out there and life is more than just work and earning money to sustain oneself. Qoute:Life is short and we have not too much time for gladdening the hearts of those who are travelling the dark way with us. Oh, be swift to love! Make haste to be kind. Henri frederic Amiel

Hope this will inspire many of us to try the ultimate experience. I shall be sharing more about my life there in pictorial and written form sometime later. Watch out for this section and keep in touch!

Caroline Wong ylwong@acs.sch.edu.sg

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Response to Caroline Wong <ylwong@acs.sch.edu.sg>:

Hi Caroline,

I read your message and it was so reassuring to know that you felt inspired from your experiences in Nepal.

A little about myself: I'm from Nepal and I've been living in the States (Phoenix, Arizona) for the last few years and working as a Software engineer. Recently I had the chance to visit Nepal after 6 years. The trip to Kathmandu and the small towns and villages in Nepal was simply out of this world. The feeling of being back there in a place that is so close to me, people that mean so much to me and the whole experince of being in such an enchanting place is just so hard to describe.

Even though it was a short trip, I have come back with a geniune feeling of belonging and doing something for the people there. Even some of my perspective in the everyday life here in the States has changed. I have been sharing my thoughts and feelings ever since I got back and I only hope that more people will get the chance to appreciate the simplicity and generosity of life that we take for granted so easily.

Hope to hear from you regarding your travels and experiences.

Niraj Gyawali http://www.west.asu.edu/nirajg/

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Greetings from Attitudinal Dynamics International, Inc.

In 1989 I visited Kathmandu, staying at the Yak and Yeti. What a great adventure! Now I am president of an International Corporation which places students in American High Schools and Universities. This month we are forming a not-for-profit foundation to assist students from developing countries with tuition payments. I also am able to personally assist students who are talented academically, but unable to afford the standard high school rate of $10,900.

If you know of any young men and women, who may benefit from our services please respond by Email to ADIStudent@AOL.COM or Call 1-708-345-6600 or Fax 1-708-345-6601 or Write ADI, Inc 805 N 6th Ave. , Maywood, Illinois 60153 USA.

We are also looking for recruiters in Nepal to assist with finding new students, and we pay $500 per qualified and placed students to recruiters.

Hoping that we develop a mutually beneficial relationship.

Normal fee $10,900 Students placed with caring host families. Schools are private safe quality university preparatory academies. Scholarships are available for talented students who have financial need.

Contact me for additional details.

Thanks,

Bob Robert J. Libka President, Attitudinal Dynamics International, Inc. 805 N 6th Ave. Maywood, Illinois 60153 USA

PH 1-708-345-6600 FX 1-708-345-6601 Email ADIStudent@AOL.COM

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

    It is regretable that certain people hate certain culture of the society of which they themselves are a part of it. It appears that they haven't tested the beauty of Nepal consisting of many ethnic groups. What is there to be proud of Nepal if one doesn't respect the rich culture of the Himalayas which consists of Sherpa, Tamang, Rai, limboo, Magar, tibetan (Manang/Dolpa), Brahmin, Chetries, Tharu and Newars of Kathmandu (the Capital of Nepal because of its rich newari cultural heritage). As the topography changes, so does the people and its culture.

 The brahmins look different than sherpa, tamang and Tibetans. Because their culture is different. In the middle mountain also usually in central Nepal tamangs are found to be living in steep slopesand Brahmins are found to be living in fertile valley floor.

 It is because brahmins are not used to difficult terrain. Like the other ethnic groups, Newars are the original people of Kathmandu. It has developed its own unique culture. It has its own script. It has been proved with archeological findings that the civilisation in Kathmandu dates back to at least zero BC. These are from the evidences of pottaries etc found in Kathmandu. The pottaries etc are so well developed that the civilisation in Kathmandu dates back to even older dates. With real evidence we don't know how old. We have only historically related legends as answeres to satisfy this interesting question. It is puzzling in the scientific world how this unique kind of civilisation started without any trace of this kind being existed outside the Kathmandu Valley. If the civilisation of Kathmandu has originated outside the valley then there must be a bridge linking (which we are gussing now) either to China or to the south (India). But hardcore evidence of such bridge is lacking.

       Look at the landuse planning of the Newars. All the towns are clustered together in one particular area with small bahals
(openings) and beautiful temples. The fertile valley floors are saved for cultivation. Because of the gift of the lake Kathmandu Valley has the most fertile soil perhaps in the world with three to four crops a year. There were so much food to eat, perhaps because of this there are so many festival. Not a week passes without somekind of festival some where in the Kathmandu Valley. That is one of the reason the popular saying " Parbate bigriyo mojle; Newar bigriyo Bhojle". As the original fertile lands of Kathmandu are fast disappearing to maintain the original culture such as bhoj (feast) etc has become very costly. Newars have their own division of labour such as Na kami (blacksmith), sin Kami (carpenter), Da kami (house constructor) and Suwals (the chefs for bhoj).

   The Jhapoos (Jha meaning work; Ya phu meaning can do ) are the original organic farmers of Kathmandu. They locally mine Kan Cha (black soil ; lake sediment) and use it as fertiliser. Once the chemical fertiliser was introduced, the organic farming system have disappeared.

   Look at the housing system of Kathmandu. The houses consists of five storey mud and brick buildings (1st floor chedi, 2nd floor mantan, 3rd floor Baithak, fourth floor chota and fifth floor Baiga( kitchen). Kitchen is always on the top floor and nobody is allowed to wear shoes and no chimney is required. All the houses are of the same height and same style except the Gavaju (prist) of Bahal. From my point of view the Kathmandu towns had once the best town planning system in the world. Even the Malla Newar King could watch from his palace which house is not cooking food that evening and send his officials to enquire why the family is not cooking food.

     Kathmandu lies in the earthquake prone zone of the Himalaya. And it has unconsolidated lake sediment. Any earthquake in the Kathmandu Valley can be very damaging because the seismic effect in such unconsolidated sediments are highly magnified than that on bed rock
(consolidated). The style and the structure of the buildings supporting each other perhaps, was one of the prime causes of less damaging effect than it should have happened in the previous earthquakes in the Kathmandu Valley. Besides these, the mud and brick houses are elastic and can swing from side to side. Any cracks developed are filled up with dust and original stucture and stability is maintained even if tilted at 30 degrees angle as we see these days in the streets of Kathmandu.
  The next earthquake in Kathmandu will not be of the same type. It will be far more devastating than the previous one. Our planners failed to learn lessons from the older generations. Todays planners have destroyed the most fertile land of the kingdom. And Town developed in such areas are not carefully planned. Nobody can say when the next earthquake is going to stike. We only know it will happen. The attitude of "forget Newari be Nepali" kind of mentality discourage people to learn from the past. We must learn from each other. There must be many many good things to learn from the other cultures.

Gopal Dongol dongolg@cuug.ab.ca

(What follows is a letter-to-editor sent to HIMAL magazine in Kathmandu by Ashutosh Tiwari. Let it be noted that Ashutosh does NOT know who Anil Tuladhar is, or what Tuladhar does. Nor has Ashutosh ever communicated with Tuladhar regarding what's in this letter.)

Editor HIMAL South Asia Magazine Lalitpur, Nepal

Dear Sir:
               
          I am all for your freedom of publication. But your response to Anil Tuladhar ("Apology Demand", page 3, January/February 1997, HIMAL) left me wondering how you reconcile that freedom with the safeguarding of an individual's right to expression.
          
          Tuladhar, a private individual, does not make money off his Internet postings, no matter how "bigoted" his views may appear to you. Moreover, if one is to believe Tuladhar, then the portion of his postings, which you carried without his prior knowledge in his own name ("Virtual Vitriol", page 28, September 1996, HIMAL) was at best an out-of-context
 excerpt and at worst a skewed representation of his position.
          
          That said, I don't find anything wrong with your plucking matters off the Internet to publish in your magazine -- as long as you do so with proper citations. But I am troubled that you, in your new commercial avatar, would go to the length of publishing THE REAL NAMES of 'alleged bigots', when you should have known better to exercize self-restraint to uphold the traditional journalistic ethics to get the same points across.
          
          That is to say, just as you would normally treat other potentially defaming-to-private-individuals stories -- which occurring in "the public domain" nonetheless call for a respect for the rights (i.e. those of privacy, expression and others) of the individuals involved -- you could have published the same soc.culture.nepal excerpts by simply assigning pseudonyms to Tuladhar, Pendse and others. That way, your freedom of publication would not have -- let's say inadvertently for now -- trampled
(and thereby cast a chill) upon Tuladhar's and others' right to free expression.

          As a Net user as well as a charter-reader of HIMAL, I am more troubled by your editorial zeal to cast private individuals in a negative light by printing their real names in your for-profit publication THAN by the fact that bigots -- alleged or otherwise -- exist in cyberspace too.

Sincerely yours, Ashutosh Tiwari Kathmandu, Nepal

********************************************************** Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 11:20:06 +0900 From: Bim Prasad Shrestha <a0a911u@cc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp> To: The Nepal Digest <NEPAL@cs.niu.edu> Subject: Re: The Nepal Digest - January 25, 1997 (19 Magh 2053 BkSm)

The Editor Nepal Digest

I am very thankful for putting me in Nepal Digest Network, through which I have really been able to peep in to nepal eventhough I am staying far away from my home country.The effort being put by Nepal Digest crew is highly appreciable and pray for its continuety at any cost.I would be also very happy if I could be of any help and contribute Nepal Digest to keep on this noble spirit. It was to my great surprise that I have been receiving incomplete and some thing strange newsletter for last several issues.I believe it must be due to some unavoidable technical reasons.I would like draw your kind attention in the way your valuable newsletter is being e-mailed to me.I could send you back the sample if it could help you to rectify it. Hoping to receive complete and fullsized Nepal Digest.

B.P.Shrestha Miyazaki University Miyazaki Japan

%%%%%Editor's Note: TND is sent to everybody with the same format %%%%%
%%%%% at once with the same program that basically %%%%%
%%%%% acts as a postmaster who copies and then sends%%%%%
%%%%% it to every single user in an identical process.%%%
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***************************************************************** From: Thorsten Bartosch <thorsten@nt.e-technik.uni-erlangen.de> Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 09:26:32 GMT To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

Dear TND Editor,

please publish my following request in one of the following TNDs.

FINDING WORK IN GERMANY OR EUROPA
--------------------------------- A friend of mine (Nepali) who lives in Kathmandu needs to find work for several month in Germany or Europa. At time I have no idea if this is possibile. I belive it will be very hard to get a visa for more than 3 month and a next very difficult step might be to get working permission (I think unimpossibile). Because of my lack of knowledge I would be very happy about any further information concerning this topic. Is there somebody out there who has already worked as a foreigner in Europa? Every information would be useful for me.

Thank You
  Thorsten Bartosch
  email: thorsten@nt.e-technik.uni-erlangen.de

********************************************************************* Date: Sun, 26 Jan 1997 14:09:12 +0800 To: info-tnd@nepal.org From: rabi <rabi@mozcom.com> Subject: VOLUNTEER JOB

DEAR SIR/MADAM I DIJE JOSHI AND MY FRIEND SUBIC BASNET, ARE GRADUATING STUDENTS FROM PHILIPPINES.OUR MAJOR IS IN FORESTRY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT RESPECTIVELY. AS WE WILL BE RETURNING TO NEPAL ON JUNE 1997 WE WOULD LIKE TO VOLUNTER OURSELVES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF OUR MOTHER LAND NEPAL. I HOPE YOU WILL CONSIDER OUR OFFER FOR THE SAKE OF OUR CONNTRY. THANK YOU.

SINCERELY YOURS DIJE AND SUBIC FOR FURTHER INQUIRY E-MAIL: RABI@MOZCOM.COM

***************************************************************** Date: Fri, 24 Jan 1997 16:32:44 PST To: info-tnd@nepal.org From: Squeamish Ossifrage <apcltc@sierra.net> Subject: (no subject)

Hello!

After browsing the internet I found your adress. I am interested in teaching English in Nepal. If you have any information concerning this subject, I would greatly appreciate you sending me some. Thank you, Genevieve Evans PO Box 3577 Olympic Valley, CA 96146

****************************************************************** From: karma@MIT.EDU To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Definition of Buddhism Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 13:08:10 EST

Shyam Sundar Ji,
        The issue I had addressed was the birth of Buddhism, not the birth of Buddha. I have not mentioned anything about the birth of Buddha. The issue here is the definition of Buddhism in the Oxford Dictionary. All I am saying is that I don't see any factual error in the definition. Furthermore, I don't think it is necessary to give the life history of Buddha when defining Buddhism.
        Buddha started a path of love and peace for humankind that has spread all over the world. Before talking about going on a war for the "ownership" of Buddha, sit back and think what Buddha would have wanted you to do in this type of a situation.
         Rabi Karmacharya ps. Sagarmatha does lie in the border between Tibet and Nepal.

***********************************************************************************************

*********************************************************************************************** Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 17:34:10 +0100 To: NEPAL@cs.niu.edu From: lo12@cornell.edu (Lazima Onta) Subject: Book Reviews from the Kathmandu Post

Forwarded from the Kathmandu Book Society/The Kathmandu Post

The following 5 essays/reviews appeared in The Kathmandu Post Review of Books, Issue No. 10, 26 January 1997. The issue was coordinated by Pratyoush Onta.

Women in Development: An Incomplete Research Agenda

by Shizu Upadhya

        Since its creation in the early 1970s following the publication of Ester Boserup's pioneering insights into the role of women in developing countries, Women in Development, or WID, has evolved into a specialized field in its own right. With statistical measures, sophisticated theoretical frameworks and even postgraduate-level degree courses to its name, the central thesis of WID, and of its more recent gender-inclined incarnations, is that project-form intervention can facilitate women's empowerment. What kinds of intervention are being advocated is less straightforward, and remains a matter of intense research both at the theoretical and practical levels of the WID sector.

        Tribhuvan University's multi-volume series on The Status of Women in Nepal (1979-81) denoted a landmark in national-level WID studies. Most of the contemporary research on women in Nepal, while much less in-depth, is still traversing the terrain charted out by the original series. However, since bold print and glossy covers do not in themselves ameliorate the plight of Nepal's women, it is worth taking a closer look at the quality of contemporary WID literature, with the following in mind: in the time that it has had to evolve, to what extent has this research initiative furthered our understanding of women's situations, and, as a result, guided us to the "right" methods of intervention on their behalf?

        It becomes clear that in certain respects, these kinds of women's studies are handicapped by a dearth of readily-available, gender-disaggregated, national-level statistical information. What is more, this data deficiency, identified as many as 15 years ago, largely persists to the same extent today. The 1991 census may proclaim, for instance, that a mere 40.4% of Nepal's female population of 10 years and above is
"economically active". However, its definition of "economically active" is restricted to income-earning activities, thereby ruling out the majority of Nepali women's daily activities as economically insignificant. Another case in point is that, to date, little information is available on important aspects of population policy, including the relationship between household income and women's fertility. In this way, data loopholes, left unremedied, continue to inhibit both theoretical understandings and practical focii of research related to women in Nepal.

        In other respects, and in spite of such data inadequacies, current WID studies exhibit a disproportionate emphasis on national-level statistics. The two statistical profiles on women in Nepal published in 1994 and 1995 (authored by Savitri Singh and Meena Acharya, respectively) might tell us, for example, that 25% of Nepal's women are literate and that the maternal mortality rate (MMR) in 1992 stood at an estimated 800 per 100,000 births. Yet statistics of this kind reveal little on the reasons why, despite a national-level expansion of primary education, the drop-out rate for girl children after completion of first grade remains so high. Or how our neighbouring countries have managed to reduce MMR, while we have hardly been able to do so. Such an understanding would, additionally, require a meticulous examination of project interventions that have worked
(as well as those that have not worked). In sum, national-level statistics, while endowing women with a certain visibility for policy makers and development practitioners, cannot single-handedly further our understanding of women and the gender-based obstacles that hinder their empowerment. Similarly, statistics alone do not greatly facilitate the construction of meaningful women's projects.

        The majority of publications in this field today are individual research exercises commissioned by donors and conducted by Kathmandu-based NGOs. Their questionnaires and interviews, case studies and participatory research exercises have over the years produced a tier of women-related information quite seperate from the above-discussed statistics compiled at the national level. One example is Shtrii Shakti's 1995 single volume update of the original Status of Women series, entitled Women, Development, Democracy - A Study of the Socio-Economic Changes in the Status of Women in Nepal (1981-1993). This is the most extensive of women's research initiatives of recent years. Shtrii Shakti's study is noteworthy for the extent to which it breaks down its findings along ethnic lines. As a result, we learn, as we did from its predecessor study, of the heterogeneity in women's situations across Nepal. The Baragaonle women of Mustang, for instance, constitute a different "target population", than do the Maithili women of Dhanusa, despite the fact that they are both defined as "rural" women. Not only do the former tend to be better informed both politically and legally, they are also more active in the expenditure and decision-making processes within the household. This research thereby manages to improve our understanding of Nepal's women.

        It is all the less comprehensible, then, why Women, Development, Democracy makes little use of the manifold of its findings when drawing the "policy recommendations" which lie at its core. Instead, standard WID policy prescriptions are put forward on a nation-wide basis; homogeneous policies for a target population that has been identified as heterogeneous. Some recommendations simply echo those made 15 years earlier: increased access for women to appropriate technology and to micro-enterprise initiatives, for instance. Others abandon women-specific issues, in support of lofty ideals such as agricultural diversification or the termination of structural adjustment programmes. Hence, even in cases where women's research attains data sufficiency, interpretation of this information is not of the kind that produces innovative women-affirmative programmes for development intervention.

        Regardless of whether it actually sells or not, contemporary women's literature of the kind reviewed here remains far from satisfactory. Overall, research on women done in Nepal has yet to live up to its self-imposed pledge of coming up with viable policy options, based on a sound comprehension of the real-life situations of women. The fault for this inability does not lie entirely with the concerned researchers. As a whole, however, and given the amount of time it has had so far, research on women should have reached a higher degree of sophistication than it has so far. Past accomplishments, such as the 1979-81 Status of Women study, need to be built on, not merely replicated. Women's research needs to interact more at the "field" level, and learn from individual women's projects. Methodologies are still overly bogged-down in basic primary data collection and dependent on inadequate secondary data for research to come closer to astute, women-centred appraisal and policy analysis. Also such scholarship has thus far isolated itself from advacements made in this field at the regional and international levels. Thus while local researchers take their time in furthering the WID agenda, the women of Nepal continue to endure some of the harshest of life conditions anywhere. Since a great deal is at stake, it is not too much to expect researchers in this field to come up with more perceptive studies that can aid interventionist development work on behalf of the women of Nepal.

(Upadhya's extensive review of contemporary women in development research in Nepal appears in Vol 1. No.2 of the journal Studies in Nepali History and Society)

Five Decades of Management Theories
________________________________________ The Individual, Work and Organization By Robin Fincham and Peter S. Rhodes Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London,1993.

Manage Your Mind By Gillian Butler and Tony Hope Oxford University Press, 1995
_________________________________________ By Surendra Sthapit

        Ever since the Industrial Revolution, different theories of management have been developed to explain the changing trend in the workplace. In the early 1930s, management focused on the proper utilization of time, manpower, money and material. Then, efficiency was measured in terms of speed and volume. The primary task of managers was to ensure this efficiency by developing working conditions that enhanced the production capacity. To explain the dynamics of the work-place, concepts such as workers and managers, labourers and owners, were formulated. Then followed a time of conflict between labour unions and company owners. This, in turn, instigated a wide range of studies and theories related to labour management. Theories on incentives, physical and material facilities, individual needs and job satisfaction were developed to provide answers faced by labour managers.

        Then came a major technological revolution. Automation dominated factories and industries. With automation, large segments of the labour force were suddently considered unskilled, expensive and inefficient. Successful companies were those that could integrate the newly emerging automation technology in their factories. A new model of work-approach had to be devised as the skill of the mind slowly took over the skill of the hand.

        Technological progress inevitably brought on the electronic revolution as transistors, conductors and chips began to dominate every sphere of life. Successful companies now had to think of ways to be different, not just better. R & D became an integral part for the growth and success of a company. Individuals became more important and powerful in shaping organizations. Lee Iococca and Chrysler, Akio Morito and Sony, John Scully and Apple are only some of the most well-known examples of this phenomenon. A new type of organizational culture developed. Companies started to create values, rights & rituals, and mission statements so that they were perceived to "stand for something". Around 1982, some analysts argued that organizational culture was the single most important factor accounting for success or failure of US corporations. But by 1987, some of the most "cultured" US companies were failing. With increasing global competition, developing corporate values and culture were nor enough for success. So the mantra of the nineties became "innovation". The best example of this is Bill Gates and his global empire of Microsoft.

        Hence, management theories, concepts and their application have seen a revolutionary change in the last five decades. In this span, the focus of management has shifted from groups to individuals, behavior to attitudes, process to results and products to services. The two books reviewed here give a fine account of this changing trend.

        The Individual,Work and Organization contains a lot of data and results of studies conducted in the sixties and seventies. The first section describes the roles, problems, differences and motivational factors of individuals in a workplace. Drawing upon a whole range of studies conducted in the field of psychology and sociology, it states and explains the different types of responses and personalities of individuals in the workplace, and discusses links between personality types and leadership, motivation and job satisfaction. The second section links the individual to the group and deals with group interaction, leadership training and humane work designs. The third section on the sociology of work talks about labour, the relation between labour and management, influence of technology, conflict and employment relations, division of labour and women in the workplace. The fourth and final section is on organizations. This book largely deals with organizational structures and company policies and focuses little on individual needs, problems and challenges. This is where the second book comes in handy.

        Manage your Mind claims to be the mental fitness guide necessary to deal with the pressures of everyday life! The layout of the book is similar to that found in many of the other "guide books": short chapters, brief segments and a summary at the end of each chapter. The first two parts deal with techniques to manage your time, problem solving, building self-confidence, and ways to relax your body and mind. Part three focuses on improving relationships in family, office and social circles. Part four and five talk about combating enemies like anxiety, worry, fears, stress, panic, depression, smoking, sleeping habits, eating habits, alcohol and drugs. The final chapter provides tips on how to sharpen ones mind and memory, develop effective study habits and mental acumen.

        As the technology changes, there will be more stress and people are more likely to be drawn towards New Age gurus such as Deepak Chopra (whose books Ageless Body, Timeless Mind, and the recent Seven Spiritual Laws of Success have been bestsellers in the US and the UK). Only time will tell how these changes will influence the life of individuals and the shape of the companies in the future.

(Sthapit is an Assistant Manager at Bluebells)

Studying Development
__________________________ Development Studies By Donald A. Messerschmidt EMR Publishing House, 1995, NRs 725 Available at: Ratna, Mandala, Educational
___________________________________ By Narayan Manandhar

        Expatriate experts, often nicknamed as "development tourists", are essentially of two kinds. One driven by pecuniary motives and the other by professional zeal. One thing that is common to both groups is that they both write reports, often in multiple volumes. However, the difference is that the former writes discrete reports as a part of official duty. Their analyses are not only unknown to the people at large but also somewhat suspicious in terms of contents. That is the reason why they do not dare to publish them. An expert driven by professional pursuits presents his/her findings in a transparent manner so that the public at large can make their judgement on his/her intellectual integrity. Donald A. Messerschmidt belongs to this second category of professionals and he has decided to prove this fact by republishing his old essays on Nepal's development experience in one neat volume called Development Studies.

        The book is a collection of eight essays on Nepal's development. In all of them, Messerschmidt has sought to look at the development process from his anthropological background. The book is a fascinating blend of theory and application. Rather than looking at development as a function of
"resource base", Messerschmidt likes to look at it from the perspective of the resource user, i.e. the people, who are often treated as the "tail of the donkey - the last thing to be put into the picture!" In one instance he writes, "People and their cultural resources and practices are at once malleable, educational, expressive, and sensitive as well as potentially aggressive and destructive. For these reasons people are among the most important factors to take into account in discussing lands and forests at risk, and in planning and implementing actions necessary to ameliorate the risk."

        In all the essays, Messerschimdt seeks to unravel the intricate process of development from an indigenous perspective rather than from an interventionist approach. His central hypothesis is that development, if it is to be sustainable, must be "natural" and it must grow out of the old.
"Its newness is rooted in the old, in the sense of reorganizing that which already exists and making it compatible with other resources." Often development experts tend to assume that traditional approaches are no longer appropriate. Hence, by using interventionist policies, they "funnel" down new and presumably better technologies designed to improve local conditions.

        Instead Messerschimdt calls for an innovative approach whereby
"intrinsic human resources of knowledge and tradition now become intrinsic to the solution of the problem; local inputs are allied in newly appropriate ways with other extrinsic resources from outside the local community." Every human society embodies in it a knowledge base. A development expert's job is to unravel, recognize, readjust and reorganize this tradition and knowledge. Irrespective of arguments related to efficiency, equity and economy, local systems survive simply because of their familiarity and their base in "tradition". Messerschmidt postulates that the "maintenance of indigenous knowledge and diversity provides a cushion against disaster. By maintaining and preserving a broad range of local socio-cultural variety, just as by preserving a large gene pool, options and solutions to crisis and conditions not yet perceived are kept alive."

        Messerschmidt discusses traditional cooperative movements in Nepal
(both their successes and failures), management of the common properties like forests and parks, approaches to participatory planning, and social conditions for the success of paper making under the Small Farmer Development Programme. In "Gateway-Hinterland Relations in Changing Nepal" Messerschmidt discusses the process of spatial development linked with the building of roads. His analysis is particularly interesting to regional planners engrossed in 'growth axis and corridors' to development in Nepal. In the last essay on mobility of the population in mountain eco-systems during the summer and winter months, he argues that such movement has more to do with the economy than with geographic variables. Apart from repetition of some ideas in the second and fifth essays, Messerschimdt has done a good job in developing (as opposed to enveloping) some unconventional ideas on alternative development in this book.

(Manandhar writes both serious and satirical pieces on issues related to development in Nepal)

A Controversial Topic
_________________________ The Lost Years Of Jesus By Elizabeth Clare Prophet Summit University Press, 1994 Reprinted by Book Faith India, Rs. 1112 Available at Pilgrims Book House
__________________________________

By A Ghosh

        Traditional biblical Christianity may take a lifetime for the reasonably intelligent to comprehend. Consequently extraneous controversies, such as those outlined in this book, can be irrelevant, especially since Christ lived so long ago that it is well-nigh impossible to prove that he was in Jagannath, the Valley of the Kings in Persia, Nepal, India, and Ladakh. This book by Elizabeth Clare Prophet sets out to chronicle the travels and experiences of Nicolas Notovich, Swami Abhedananda, Professor Nicholas Roerich and Elisabeth Caspari, who found and researched ancient texts according to which Jesus spent 17 years as a student and teacher in the Orient before making his biblical advent on the shores of Galilee. These four walked the Himalayan ranges to return with this most revolutionary message.

        In a cogently written book Prophet points out that "the Gospels do not say what Jesus looked like, provide only the vaguest of geographical and chronological data, and even leave a question about his exact occupation . . . there is no definitive proof that Jesus was a carpenter." In fact, Origen objected to the entire notion on the grounds that "Jesus himself is not described as a carpenter anywhere in the Gospels accepted by the churches . . . only four of the eighty-nine chapters of the Gospels, two each in Matthew and Luke, describe Jesus' life prior to his ministry."

        A veil descends on his life until he is baptised by John in the Jordan River at about age 30. The traditionalists would say that nothing was recorded of Jesus' early life because he did not do anything worthwhile in that time. According to this book, however, Nicolas Notovich, a Russian journalist and probably a convert of whom even less is known than about Christ, ran across an ancient Buddhist manuscript (while travelling in Ladakh in 1887) that said Jesus was in India during the 'lost' years.

        This book may be of interest to non-Christians especially keen on establishing that Christ was not the son of God but an avatar, which may suit their purposes by equating a man Christians consider the son of God with Ramakrishna, Guru Nanak, Zoroaster and other great prophets. What is difficult to comprehend is: if non-Christians are convinced that Christ existed, and that he spent years in India, Nepal and Tibet, why don't they convert themselves to Christianity en masse? Christians, however, believe Christ was the son of God and, after crucifixion, arose from the tomb in which he had been interred, giving rise to a great hope for mankind. Should that not be the case, they have been barking up the wrong tree for 1997 years. Consequently they are unlikely to find this book of much interest, especially since it relies on researches conducted too far away and long ago to inspire all that much confidence.

        The research behind the book was also confounded by the fact that contemptuous monks seem convinced that all foreigners steal if they can; that being the case, even to enquire about the existence of an ancient manuscript arouses suspicions that the enquirer intends to misappropriate it if possible. All four researchers on whose work this book is based were honourable people: Swami Abhedananda was a close acquaintance of none other than the legendary Max Muller, their relationship based on common interests and mutual respect. Roerich was a Russian-born painter, poet, archaeologist, philosopher, mystic, diplomat, writer, critic, educator, set and costume designer, explorer and adventurer. Caspari was a music teacher.

        "Could all . . . have fabricated their stories or been fooled by various lamas?" asks Prophet towards the end of the book. That is a question for the individual reader to answer.

(A Ghosh is a freelancer)

Remembering Life in Prison
_____________________________________ Jailko Samjhana By Durga Ghimire Abhibyakti Prakashan, Kathmandu, 2050 v.s. Rs.75
_____________________________________

By Abana Onta

        Jailko Samjhana is an account primarily of a part of Durga Ghimire's life which she spent in two different jails of Nepal. She was first imprisoned in 2027 v.s. for three months at the Central Jail in Kathmandu. At the end of that year she was again arrested and held at the D.S.P.'s office in Biratnagar for one and half months. She was once again imprisoned at the Central Jail for nine months in 2028 v.s.

        Ghimire was born in 2005 v.s. in Dharan but grew up in Biratnagar as her family had moved there permanently in 2006 v.s. She attended Adarsha Balika Bidhyalaya in Biratnagar where she was impressed and inspired by guruamas such Susma Koirala, Sadhana Adhikary, Santa Ghimire, and Indira Acharya. She acknowledges that she learned her first lessons in social awareness and obligations from them. She further writes that the school's environment encouraged social awareness and did not limit the students' learning to a simple reading of the textbooks. There was a very active student union in the school of which Ghimire was elected the President as a student of grade nine in 2019 v.s. She also took part in debate competitions, cultural programmes and sports, thus learning the skills of leadership.

        After she passed the SLC exams, she joined Mahendra Morang College in Biratnagar in 2021 v.s. and received IA and BA degrees from there. As a college student, she started her political career by joining the Nepal Student Union, the student wing of the then banned Nepali Congress Party. She actively participated in the student movement from 2024 v.s. This was deemed to be illegal on the eyes of the Panchayat administration which then put her behind the bars. Despite her family's strong resentment towards her political activities, she continued her work as an active member of the Union. Later she managed to continue her studies in Kathmandu and received an MA in economics from Tribhuvan University.

        The book contains vivid descriptions of life in the women cells at the Central Jail. She presents moving accounts of her friends at the jail: Ratna Kumari bajaii, Chaoukidarni Dhana Kumari, Chandrabadan, Badarni Mainya, Noon, Khursani, Naikini Ratna Kumari, Chali, Mukti, Magarni Kanchi, and Dharma Kumari. Ghimere describes their horrible lives in the jail and tells us how they got there in the first place. Most of them ended up there not even knowing their crimes but simply because they were victims of social injustice towards women - a very familiar plight in our society. As the author depicts various aspects of the lives of women prisoners, it becomes clear that there was no solidarity among them. She describes how some women prisoners dominated others by physically abusing them, by stealing their food and money, and by making their lives more miserable in general. The author also touchingly describes her feelings towards her parents as she at times felt that she had hurt them by not living up to their expection of a good daughter.

        At the end of the book, the author discusses her work with the Centre for Economic Development and Administration after she decided to quit active politics around 2030 v.s.. Ghimere also discusses her marriage with Jagadish Ghimire, her life in London for four years when her husband worked there, and her subsequent active involvement in various NGOs in Nepal. Although she sounds a little frustrated with the post-Panchayat political situation of the country, she seems determined to empower the women of Nepal. She writes, "to reach my goal, all I have to do is to remember the faces of my unfortunate and exploited female companions at the jail, and I don't need a better source of inspiration than that." This book is remarkable for its contents and for its readability. It should be read by all.

(Onta likes to read auto/biographical works)

Announcement:

I) Issue no. 11 of The Kathmandu Post Review of Books will be published on 23 February 1997. It will be coordinated by Shizu Upadhya. It will contain the following:

Lazima Onta-Bhatta: Essay on recent history of NGOs in Nepal Yasuko Fujikura reviews a book on Nepali women's lives Jogendra Ghimere reviews "Women and Law in Colonial India" by Janaki Nair Bikash Thapaliya reviews a book related to privatization in Russia Kavita Sherchan reviews a collection of Amod Bhattarai's short stories

II) The Kathmandu Book Society strives to be a critical forum for discussions on Nepal's book industry - broadly defined. Its meetings will take place at Martin Chautari (Thapathali) at 5:30pm on the second last Sunday of each month. Publishers, book-sellers and authors are requested to send in books for reviews to POBox 12456, Kathmandu. Attn: Ashutosh Tiwari (tel 470013) or Shailesh Gongal (242977).

Lazima Onta-Bhatta Department of Anthropology Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 email: lo12@cornell.edu

****************************************************************** Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 09:48:46 -0500 To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: [Fwd: Fate of the girlchild : life a curse?] From: Ravindra Sapkota <Palpali@bioch.ox.ac.uk>

Our culture(yes I know that Nepal has a variety of cultures)has always given men the chance to treat our women in a hypocritical manner. While on one hand they are depicted as goddesses and given utmost respect as sisters and mothers, they are treated like second-class citizens in a marriage. When they are growing up, parents pretend to show more respect to them ( than to their sons) by bowing to them and touching their feet in order to get blessings,esp. during festivals that involve Pujas or any other kind of God worship. But those Devis(Goddesses) are more likely to be treated like servans than not. In the mornings, when their brothers are doing their homeworks, they will be helping mum in the kitchen. When their brothers leave for shool after the morninf meal, they will be sent to cut fodder for the cattle and collect firewood from forests.The evenings are mere repetions of the mornings. The boring routine never changes until they marry.

The situation then gets worse.From servants (and a burden) to their parents, they become slaves to the countless in-laws.They are not deemed worthy of inheriting their forefathers' assets and name.It is them who must renounce their parents and their village to go and live at their husbands houses and have to bear with those God-knows-how-many relatives of their husbands.The husbands, on the other hand, get a VIP treatment from their wives' relatives.Wives usually have very little say in the buying or selling of their common assets, it has to be the husband who decides.

The list goes on and on,and things are not changing much. There will be a lot of people who will say that such rampant sexism is the result of poverty, but I fail to understand why daughters should have to cushion the blow of poverty in order to make thing more comfortable for the sons.

Perhaps we need a "revolution" in our society, perhaps it is time we realized the need to empower our women.Our country cannot develop unless that half of the population is given their fair share of responsibility, respect and reward.

I am interested to know what fellow netters think.How bad do you think is the problem And by the way, does anybody know what happend to the bill on daughter's right to her parents assets ?

***************************************************** Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 01:19:46 +0800 To: webmaster-tnd@nepal.org From: rabi <rabi@mozcom.com> Subject: REQUEST FOR PUBLICATION

NEPALESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
                               BAGUIO-BENGUET,PHILIPPINES
    NSA (NEPALESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION) BAGUIO BENGUET,PHILIPPINES,IS AN ASSOCIATION WHICH CATERS TO THE NEED AND ORGANIZATION OF NEPALESE STUDENTS STUDYING AMONG THE FIVE UNIVERSITIES LOCATED IN BAGUIO CITY AND LA TRINIDAD, BENGUET PHILIPPINES.NSA IS A BRANCH OF APNEPSA (ALL PHILIPPINES NEPALESE STUDENT ASSOCIATION) WHICH OVERLOOKS THE ACTIVITIES OF NEPALESE STUDENTS ALL OVER THE PHILIPPINES. AT THE PRESENT THERE ARE NEARLY 200 STUDENTS IN THE PHILIPPINES, OUT OF ALL THESE 106 OF THEM ARE STUDYING IN BAGUIO AND BENGUET.THUS MAKING BAGUIO AND BENGUET THE CENTER OF MOST NEPALESE ACTIVITIES.
   AMONG ALL THE PLACES TO CHOOSE FROM IN THE PHILIPPINES WHYDO MOST NEPALESE CHOOSE BAGUIO AND BENGUET? BAGUIO CITY IS KNOWN AS THE SUMMER CAPITAL OF THE PHILIPPINES THEREFORE IT CAN BE ASSUMED THAT THE WEATHER HERE IS QUITE COOL AND COMFORTABLE COMPARED TO THE REST OF THE COUNTRY. ASIDE FROM THIS BAGUIO CITY IS LOCATED IN THE HILLY REGION OF THE PHILIPPINES SO TO AN AVERAGE NEPALI WHEN YOU THIS CITY IT FEELS AS THOUGH YOU NEVER LEFT NEPAL, SO ADJUSTING TO THE CLIMATE AND PHYSICAL LANDSCAPE IS NO PROBLEM.AS BAGUIO CITY IS LOCATED AMONG THE HILLS IT IS ONE OF THE MOST GREENEST AND CLEANEST PLACE IN THE PHLIIPPINES WITH THE MOST HOSPITABLE PEOPLE IN THE WORLD. BEARING ALL THIS IN MIND IT IS THEREFORE THE MOST IDEAL PLACE TO STUDY IN THE PHILIPPINES, ESPECIALLY TO A NEPALI.
   THE YEAR WHEN THE FIRST NEPALI ARRIVED IN BAGUIO IS UNCERTAIN BUT THE FIRST RECORDED ACCOUNTS OF THE PRESENCE OF NEPALESE IN BAGUIO IS DATED BACK TO 1986, THE ESTABLISHMENT OF NSA, AT WHICH TIME THERE WERE 26 MEMBERS.EVERSINCE THEN THERE HAS BEEN A STEADY INCEASE OF NEPALESE TO BAGUIO LEADING TO THE PRESENT CONDITION.
   NSA'S PRIME GOAL IS TO ORGANIZE DIFFERENT EVENTS TO BRING THE WHOLE NEPALESE COMMUNITY TOGETHER TO CREATE AN ATMOSPHERE OF NEPAL WHILE BEING SO FAR FROM HOME.SINCE THE BEGINNING OF NSA WITH Mr.KESHAB KOIRALA AS ITS PRESIDENT,NSA ORGANISED A WELCOME AND FAREWELL PARTY TO WECOME THE NEWLY ARRIVED STUDENTS TO BAGUIO AND TO BID FAREWELL TO THE GRADUATED STUDENTS.ASIDE FROM THIS NSA HOSTED A DASHAIN PARTY.IN 1995 WITH Mr.SABIN BASNYAT AS ITS PRESIDENT THE FIRST SAWASWATI PUJA WAS CELEBRATED HERE IN THE PHILIPPINES WHICH WAS AN UNIQUE EXPERIENCE FOR ALL OF THE NEPALESE STUDENTS.THE FOLLOWING YEAR WITH DEEPAK RAJ JOSHI AS ITS PRESIDENT NSA DECIDED TO HOST AN ANNUAL SPORTSMEET WITHIN THE NEPALESE COMMUNITY WHICH WAS DUBED AS THE BIJAYA RUNNING SHIELD,NAMED AFTER ONE OF BAGUIO'S MOST POPULAR NEPALI STUDENT,Mr. BIJAYA KRISHNA SHRESTHA, WHO GRADUATED FROM SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY,BAGUIO CITY WITH A DEGREE IN ARCHITECTURE IN 1995.A NEW ACTIVITY PROPOSED FOR THIS YEAR IS TO PUT UP AN EXHIBITION ABOUT NEPAL, TO SHARE THE BEAUTY AND PROSPERITY OF NEPAL TO THE FILIPINO PEOPLE.ALL OF THESE ACTIVITIES ARE HELD EVERY YEAR AND WILL BE CONTINUED BY THE NEWLY APPIONTED EXECUTIVE MEMBERS OF NSA WHO WERE ELECTED LAST DEC.1996.THE NEW EX-COM MEMBERS ARE AS FOLLOWS:
 
 PRESIDENT : Mr.BISWA GAUCHAN
 VICE-PRESIDENT : Mr.BIMAL R. REGMI
 SECRETARY : Mr.DEPENDRA RIZAL
 AST. SECRETARY : Mr.BIKASH SHRESTHA
 TREASURER : Ms.MERINA PANDAY
 SPORTS&CULTURAL SECRETARY: Mr.KEYOOR GAUTAM
 EXECUTIVE MEMBERS : 1.Mr.RAJESH GURUNG
                            2.Mr.KESHAB PAUDYEL
                            3.Mr.NAVIN B. BASNYET
                            4.Ms UPASANA BHUNDEL
                            5.Mr.BISWA BILAS TIMILSINA

ADVISORY BOARD : 1.Mr.DEEPAK RAJ JOSHI
                 2.Mr.RABI SHARMA
                 3.Mr.SABIN BASNYAT
                 4.Mr.SHAILAJ KARMACHARAYA
                 5.Mr.SWARUB SHRESTHA
                             
 THEREFORE IT CAN BE SEEN THAT NSA HAS DONE A LOT TO BRING THE NEPALESE STUDENTS TOGETHER SO FAR AWAY FROM HOME .DUE TO THIS TOGETHERNESS AMONG THE NEPALESE HERE IN BAGUIO IT CAN BE SAID THAT THE NEPALESE IN BAGUIO HAVE NOT LOST THEIR IDENTITY AS A PROUD NEPALI AND HAVE COME TO UNDERSTAND THE NECESSITY OF THE ROLE OF THE YOUTH TOWARDS THE BETTERMENT OF THEIR HOMELAND i.e. NEPAL.

IF YOU NEED ANY INFORMATION REGARDING BAGUIO CITY, LA TRINIDAD,BENGUET,AND THEIR RESPESTIVE UNIVERSITIES AND THEIR NEPALESE STUDENTS PLEASE CONTACT THE FOLLOWING:
  
       RABI SHARMA e-mail:rabi@mozcom.com
       DEEPAK RAJ JOSHI e-mail : bsu@burgos.slu.edu.ph

****************************************************************** To: nepal@cs.niu.edu Subject: Fate of the girlchild : life a curse? Date: Wed, 29 Jan 97 13:57:35 EST Forwarded from: rshresth@BBN.COM

Cross-posted from SCN:
---------------------

Our culture(yes I know that Nepal has a variety of cultures)has always given men the chance to treat our women in a hypocritical manner. While on one hand they are depicted as goddesses and given utmost respect as sisters and mothers, they are treated like second-class citizens in a marriage. When they are growing up, parents pretend to show more respect to them ( than to their sons) by bowing to them and touching their feet in order to get blessings,esp. during festivals that involve Pujas or any other kind of God worship. But those Devis(Goddesses) are more likely to be treated like servans than not. In the mornings, when their brothers are doing their homeworks, they will be helping mum in the kitchen. When their brothers leave for shool after the morninf meal, they will be sent to cut fodder for the cattle and collect firewood from forests.The evenings are mere repetions of the mornings. The boring routine never changes until they marry.

The situation then gets worse.From servants (and a burden) to their parents, they become slaves to the countless in-laws.They are not deemed worthy of inheriting their forefathers' assets and name.It is them who must renounce their parents and their village to go and live at their husbands houses and have to bear with those God-knows-how-many relatives of their husbands.The husbands, on the other hand, get a VIP treatment from their wives' relatives.Wives usually have very little say in the buying or selling of their common assets, it has to be the husband who decides.

The list goes on and on,and things are not changing much. There will be a lot of people who will say that such rampant sexism is the result of poverty, but I fail to understand why daughters should have to cushion the blow of poverty in order to make thing more comfortable for the sons.

Perhaps we need a "revolution" in our society, perhaps it is time we realized the need to empower our women.Our country cannot develop unless that half of the population is given their fair share of responsibility, respect and reward.

I am interested to know what fellow netters think.How bad do you think is the problem And by the way, does anybody know what happend to the bill on daughter's right to her parents assets ?

Ravindra Sapkota palpali@bioch.ox.ac.uk

************************************************************* Date: 29 Jan 1997 11:57:42 -0800 From: "Sharma, Bineet K" <Bineet.K.Sharma@siemenscom.com> To: nepaldigest <nepal@cs.niu.edu> (IPM Return requested) Subject: FW: UNDP funding program for Nepalese professionals for stint in Nepal

Dear friends,

Here is the follow up from PLACING NEPAL ON THE GLOBAL I.T. MAP for the SEARCC - CAN Info-Tech '97 and exciting opportunity for "Transfer of Knowledge Through Expatriate Nationals" (TOKTEN)

Bineet Sharma bineet.sharma@siemenscom.com

From: (Beltronix) To: Sharma, Bineet K Subject: UNDP funding program for Nepalese professionals for stint in Nepal Date: Wednesday, January 29, 1997 6:38AM

Jan 29, 1997

Dear Bineet & other Nepalese professionals abroad,

The SEARCC meeting in Nepal went extremely well. The SEARCC presence drew unprecendented media attention and thus government attention naturally followed. The crowds at the CAN Info-Tech '97 were also unprecedented as a result. No amount of banging our heads against the wall or lobbying with HMG could have gotten us anywhere near to having the SEARCC meeting achieved for us! We are definitely at a peak from the viewpoint of Computer Association of Nepal credibility with HMG.

The question then becomes, where do we go from here?

One of the interesting points that came out during discussions was that UNDP has a program to fund Nepalese professionals working abroad to spend their time in Nepal professionally. This could be a very good way to explore the possibilities in information technology development in Nepal. Please spread the word, anyone of you there interested?

Bijaya K Shrestha
  President Computer Association of Nepal

During the

BELTRONIX - computer & electronics - ENGINEERS GPO Box 1064, Pratap Bhawan, Kantipath, Kathmandu, NEPAL Phones: (977 1) 249-285, 249-684, 249-784, 249-984 Fax: (977 1) 249 - 059 & 527 - 884 Email: ceo@beltronx.wlink.com.np Patan Branch: Inar, Kupondole, Patan ph: 521-999 & 527-999

******************************************************************** Date: Thu, 30 Jan 1997 11:56:13 -0800 From: "Damber Gurung" <dgrng@CLEMSON.EDU> To: nepal@cs.niu.edu

CROSS LISTED FROM WTN

Police arrest 24 Tibetans for illegally entering Nepal
------------------------------------------------------

       KATHMANDU, Jan 30 (AFP) - Nepalese police at the border with China have arrested 24 Tibetans for illegally entering Nepal, a police source said Thursday.

    "Those Tibetans arrested at the Lamabagar entrypoint in Dolakha district, 200 kilometres (125 miles) northeast of here, included 18 men and six women," the source said.

    "The Dolakha District Police Office has sent the arrestees to the Department of Immigration in the Nepalese capital for further action," he said.

    The police source did not say when the Tibetans were arrested.

    Tibetans enter Nepal to go to Dharamsala in northern India, the home in exile of their spiritual and religious leader the Dalai Lama.

    The Dalai Lama has been living in India along with over 100,000 Tibetans since a failed uprising in the 1950s against China's occupation of the Himalayan region.

    Though Nepal has banned demonstrations and meetings against China by the over 25,000 Tibetans living in Nepal, protests still occur from from time to time.

    Nepal has vowed that it will not allow anyone, especially its neighbours India and China, to "use its soil to hatch a conspiracy against a friendly country."

    Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba stressed during a visit to China last year that Nepal would not let anyone use its territory to launch activities that could be detrimental to its neighbours.

    In the last ten months police have arrested some 2,360 Tibetans for illegally entering Nepal.

********************************************************************* To: nepal-request@cs.niu.edu From: TARA D GURUNG <gurungtd@kahu.lincoln.ac.nz> Subject: (Fwd) cv

Dear Editor,

would appreciate if the following request could be included in the coming issue of TND. Sincerely, Tara.

Date: Wed, 29 Jan 1997 21:54:34 +0200 From: Edward Krasnov <root@ruta.kharkov.ua> Subject: cv To: gurungtd@kauri.lincoln.ac.nz

Dear Sir/Madam, I would like very much to receive any job in Nepal. But I do not know how can I do it? Give me, please, good advise. Thank you! e-mail: root@ruta.kharkov.ua

About myself: Full Names: Edward Yeugenievich Krasnov Address: 240 Druzhbi Narodov Street Apt. 28 Kharkov 310183 Ukraine Country of Citizenship: Ukraine Age: 25 years Education: 1978-1986 Secondary School 1986-1988 High School 1988-1993 Studied in Kharkov State University, Qualification: Biologist, Biology and Chemistry Teacher Specialization: Physiology and Biochemistry of Plants 1995-1996(3 months) Studied in Krishnamurti Education Centre in Brockwood Park, England. Learnt philosophy, psychology, Man and Surroundings Working experience: 1992-1993(3 months) Worked in Kharkov State University as Laboratory assistant in Laboratory of microbiology 1993-1994 Worked in Plant-growing Firm as Director of Glass house 1994-1995 Worked in Kharkov Institute of Agricultural chemistry and Soil science in Agricultural ecology and biological agriculture Laboratory as engineer-biologist 1996-now Working in Ltd "Vitako" as Manager with using of computer (DOS, WINDOWS3.0, WINDOWS 3.11, WINDOWS 95, Microsoft office, Page Maker, Corel 4-5) Language proficiency: English, excellent Special interest: computer, philosophy, psychology, biology Give me, please, your answer on my e-mail:root@ruta.kharkov.ua

Sincerely, Edward

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